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Speakership

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 23, 1989
Jim Wright's claim to the speakership of the U.S. House of Representatives rests not with the adequacy of the legal defense he was prepared to present today to charges of violating House rules against conflicts of interest. The speakership is not an office that is held by legal right, but by political support, leadership ability and--when necessary--moral and parliamentary persuasion. Just like his 434 colleagues, however, Jim Wright does have a legal stake in his House seat, having been duly elected to that position by the voters of the 12th Congressional District of Texas.
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January 2, 2013 | By Lisa Mascaro, Washington Bureau
WASHINGTON - When Republicans chose John A. Boehner as House speaker two years ago, the former plastics salesman who had served two decades in Congress finally had the job he wanted. Trouble was, he couldn't have picked a worse time. That reality played out again late New Year's Day, when Boehner suffered a stinging rebuke as his rambunctious tea-party-inspired majority - more conservative and less willing to compromise than he is - abandoned their leader on the "fiscal cliff" deal.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 17, 1997
"Bustamante Blasted for School Funds Delay" (March 6) left me sickened. It is unbelievable that the speaker of the Assembly, in an attempt to even some "imagined" political score with a couple of colleagues, would play political games that could only harm school children in San Bernardino and Riverside counties. Whom does this guy think he is hurting? Cruz Bustamante has devalued the office of the speakership. If his goal is to also further erode the image of elected officials he is accomplishing his goal with flying colors.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 17, 2009 | By Eric Bailey and Shane Goldmacher
He got the bug early, walking precincts in his Los Angeles neighborhood at the age of 14, talking politics with aplomb, prompting adults to marvel and agree: John Pérez was going places. Now, after his rookie year as a Sacramento lawmaker, Pérez is on the cusp of catapulting from a relatively obscure spot in the state Assembly to its most powerful position, the speaker's chair. Assembly Democrats are expected to formally vote him into office next month. A former union official who grew up in the neighborhoods of Highland Park and El Sereno and is a cousin of Mayor Antonio Villaraigosa, Pérez bested more seasoned competitors in a long, behind-the-scenes battle for the speakership.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 19, 1995
Voters in [Assemblywoman] Doris Allen's 67th Assembly District are being asked to vote on Nov. 28 [on her recall]. Having read the numerous mailings, we, as voters, have to ask ourselves what our assemblywoman has contributed in the last 12 years. In recent memory, I have been encouraged by her strong stands on education, crime, health, family unity, environment and Orange County's recovery. None of this legislator's legislative actions have been illegal! Our assemblywoman is being attacked by a moneyed, "good old boy" network, now known as the "Orange County Machine."
OPINION
February 10, 2007
Re "Leo McCarthy, 76; Democrat served as lieutenant governor, Assembly speaker," obituary, Feb. 6 I was privileged to be Leo T. McCarthy's press secretary from 1978 to 1981, the last three years of his Assembly speakership. McCarthy tended toward blandness, favoring plaid jackets and mismatched pants, shirts and ties. Another top aide and I hustled him off to a Beverly Hills haberdasher who outfitted him in suits more befitting a leading politician. Still, despite the new outfits, he remained the essential Leo -- tightly focused on his job, somewhat stiff on the public stage but a superb public servant, true to himself and his principles even when they went against popular opinion.
OPINION
April 20, 1997 | ROSS K. BAKER, Ross K. Baker is a professor of political science at Rutgers University
The problem that now confronts the U.S. House of Representatives transcends the issue of Newt Gingrich's speakership. It is, rather, the very well-being of the institution that is at stake. In the course of the eight years since Jim Wright's forced resignation from the speakership, the House has been sucked into a vortex of partisan discord from which it will not soon escape unless a truce is proclaimed.
NEWS
August 24, 1995 | GEORGE SKELTON
Doris Allen and Shannon Faulkner are similar in one regard: Both are pioneers. Unlike Faulkner, however, Allen didn't call it quits at the edge of the wilderness. She's still trudging into the unknown. Faulkner fought through the courts to become the first woman cadet at The Citadel, then folded during hell week to avoid "killing myself just for the political point."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 17, 2009 | By Eric Bailey and Shane Goldmacher
He got the bug early, walking precincts in his Los Angeles neighborhood at the age of 14, talking politics with aplomb, prompting adults to marvel and agree: John Pérez was going places. Now, after his rookie year as a Sacramento lawmaker, Pérez is on the cusp of catapulting from a relatively obscure spot in the state Assembly to its most powerful position, the speaker's chair. Assembly Democrats are expected to formally vote him into office next month. A former union official who grew up in the neighborhoods of Highland Park and El Sereno and is a cousin of Mayor Antonio Villaraigosa, Pérez bested more seasoned competitors in a long, behind-the-scenes battle for the speakership.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 4, 1996
Re "Gingrich Sees Broad Effort to 'Destroy' Him," June 27: House Speaker Newt Gingrich (R-Ga.) has come out of hiding! He admits that he has been "clearly damaged" in public opinion, and once again he attacks the media. In reality he is the victim of his own intemperate rhetoric. The truth is that bombastic Newt is an articulate spokesperson for positions that most voters abhor. There is exquisite irony when he pleads that his enemies are out to "destroy the messenger." The representative from Georgia began his own campaign of annihilating the messengers immediately upon assuming the House speakership.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 30, 2009 | SANDY BANKS
California Assembly Speaker Karen Bass earned her political stripes on the streets as a grass-roots activist for more than a decade. Her Community Coalition helped change the landscape of South Los Angeles by shutting down seedy low-rent motels and converting liquor stores to grocery markets. Her colleagues in Sacramento had such faith in her, they elected her speaker last year, after her first term in the Assembly.
OPINION
February 10, 2007
Re "Leo McCarthy, 76; Democrat served as lieutenant governor, Assembly speaker," obituary, Feb. 6 I was privileged to be Leo T. McCarthy's press secretary from 1978 to 1981, the last three years of his Assembly speakership. McCarthy tended toward blandness, favoring plaid jackets and mismatched pants, shirts and ties. Another top aide and I hustled him off to a Beverly Hills haberdasher who outfitted him in suits more befitting a leading politician. Still, despite the new outfits, he remained the essential Leo -- tightly focused on his job, somewhat stiff on the public stage but a superb public servant, true to himself and his principles even when they went against popular opinion.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 3, 2001 | MIGUEL BUSTILLO and JULIE TAMAKI, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Leading state officials said Monday that Herb Wesson is poised to become the next speaker of the California Assembly--the third Los Angeles-area Democrat in a row to lead the state's lower house.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 19, 1999 | BOB RECTOR, Bob Rector is opinion editor for the San Fernando Valley and Ventura County editions of The Times
When the members of the state Assembly gather next month in Sacramento to select their next speaker, chances are better than good that the person they choose will be Bob Hertzberg, an energetic and engaging Democrat from the San Fernando Valley. After all, Hertzberg has been handpicked by his longtime friend and colleague Antonio Villaraigosa, who is leaving the speaker's post and running for mayor of Los Angeles.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 29, 1999 | MIGUEL BUSTILLO, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Bob Hertzberg buzzes over to a bookcase and proudly displays the type of innovation that embodies his philosophy of government and, he believes, will help him become the next speaker of the California Assembly. It is an encyclopedic set of training manuals--legislative Cliff's Notes for the hordes of freshman lawmakers now populating the lower house.
NEWS
December 20, 1998 | JANET HOOK and EDWIN CHEN, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
House Speaker-designate Bob Livingston (R-La.), battered by personal and political fallout after admitting he had committed adultery, jolted the Capitol on Saturday by announcing he would not accept the leadership job and would resign from Congress. With two of the government's top three positions--the presidency and the speakership--in turmoil, Republicans moved quickly to stabilize their ranks. They immediately rallied behind Rep. J. Dennis Hastert (R-Ill.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 23, 1994
In his commentary on the state Assembly speakership stalemate (Dec. 14), UCLA law Prof. Daniel Lowenstein asks, "Who is to blame?" The normative judgment expressed throughout is that Jim Brulte (R-Rancho Cucamonga) should have been voted Speaker. Why? Because mathematically, there are now more Republicans than Democrats in the Assembly. So when Paul Horcher (R-Diamond Bar) bolts from GOP ranks and votes for Willie Brown, everything gets murky and cries of irresponsibility and unethical behavior ensue.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 3, 1997
I believe that Newt Gingrich is a liar! This House speaker should step down. We constantly stress honesty in life; unfortunately this man believed his own agenda was more important than the image of the office. How can we expect our children, whom Newt purports to care about, to be honest with their government or even themselves when a government leader is a liar and most likely a tax cheat. To make matters worse, major Republican allies are whitewashing the entire episode. Are these leaders implying that lying while in a leadership position is OK?
NEWS
July 21, 1997 | MARLENE CIMONS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Conservative House Republicans continued sniping at each other Sunday as they argued over responsibility for a failed rebellion against House Speaker Newt Gingrich (R-Ga.), who engineered the Republican takeover of the House in the 1994 elections. New York Rep. Bill Paxon, who either jumped or was pushed from his House leadership post last week after the coup against Gingrich fell apart, has been widely touted as a possible successor to Gingrich.
OPINION
April 20, 1997 | ROSS K. BAKER, Ross K. Baker is a professor of political science at Rutgers University
The problem that now confronts the U.S. House of Representatives transcends the issue of Newt Gingrich's speakership. It is, rather, the very well-being of the institution that is at stake. In the course of the eight years since Jim Wright's forced resignation from the speakership, the House has been sucked into a vortex of partisan discord from which it will not soon escape unless a truce is proclaimed.
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