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ENTERTAINMENT
September 25, 2005
WELL, I guess Gwyneth Paltrow, or anyone for that matter, is not allowed to have a negative opinion of President Bush ... and that poor woman from Irvine [Letters, Sept. 18], afraid to speak her mind. This is a democracy? VICTORIA GROSTICK San Luis Obispo
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
April 25, 2014 | By Susan Rohwer, guest blogger
Celebrities who question the safety of vaccines just won't shut up. It seems like every week there's another famous person spouting some anti-vaccine nonsense, from Jenny McCarthy to Kristin Cavalari to Donald Trump and now, Alicia Silverstone . The continuing spread of misinformation about vaccines by celebs is alarming. And because the power of celebrity is used to sell products and champion social causes, like it or not, what famous people say has influence. So will the pro-vaccine celebrities please stand up?
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NEWS
August 25, 1991
We should be grateful to Culver City Councilman Steven Gourley for speaking up about problems stemming from overpopulation in Los Angeles and the continuing flow of legal and illegal immigrants into this area (Times, Aug. 18). A key phrase in one of Gourley's answers to questions about illegal immigration is, ". . . and no one seems to want to do anything about it." Unfortunately, the longer we remain quiet the worse the problems become. Silence is not a virtue when one sees serious disorder developing.
HOME & GARDEN
April 25, 2014 | Mark Paredes
She had me at privyet . I had just delivered a talk in Romania on Jewish-Mormon relations (a niche topic, to be sure) at a church in Bucharest, and standing before me was Florina, a raven-haired beauty who greeted me in Russian after learning we had both lived in Moscow. Then she switched to English, which she had acquired as an au pair in London. I was a never-married bachelor in my early 40s and had begun to doubt that Miss Right and I would ever cross paths, much less during a speaking tour of Eastern Europe.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 21, 2009 | Eric Bailey and Patrick McGreevy
State lawmakers passed measures Thursday to protect foreign-speaking business patrons and make life tough for waterfowl that imperil airline travelers. Worried that geese and jets don't mix, the Senate approved a bill that would give airports greater authority to avoid run-ins with game wardens if they need to kill birds that could interfere with jets. Meanwhile, the Assembly approved a measure that would prohibit restaurants and other establishments from refusing to serve patrons because they're speaking a different language.
OPINION
January 20, 1991
Generally speaking, "Old soldiers never die." Privately speaking, "Only the young ones do." ED KYSAR, Reseda
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 1, 1991
Happy new decade (technically speaking). MICHAEL E. LEVITON Encino
ENTERTAINMENT
February 29, 1992
I was pleased to see "Speaking of Implants" (Feb. 24) about how Jenny Jones decided to "come out" with her personal tales of the negative effects that breast implants have had on her body. It is great that we now have a public figure speaking out and informing the public on the dangers that accompany breast implants. EVA FIELDS North Hollywood
ENTERTAINMENT
May 3, 1987
Kristofferson puts on a good concert, makes interesting movies, is an outstanding songwriter and is now speaking out politically. He's to be congratulated--that's terrific! PAT ELLISON Ventura
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 2, 1989
"The mayor is too strong a man, too big a fighter. He would never quit. He is not a person who would lie down like (Jim) Wright." --Ethel Bradley, the mayor's wife, speaking of her husband's determination to remain in office despite the controversy surrounding some of his financial dealings.
NATIONAL
April 22, 2014 | Tina Susman and Alana Semuels
The cheers were louder, the runners more determined, the tears of joy and relief at the Boston Marathon finish line Monday more heartfelt than ever. And yes, the security was tighter. But on a brilliant spring day, the city brought to grief by terrorist bombings one year earlier sprinted back in the resolute style of the runners who tore through quiet suburbs and charming town squares to the finish line, where the roars grew deafening as Meb Keflezighi became the first American man to win the marathon since 1983.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 19, 2014 | By Mike Boehm, Los Angeles Times
"What's my motivation?" is a standard laugh line satirizing the acting profession, a livelihood in which it's not always clear why one is doing what one needs to do. At the moment, Daniel Beaty and Keith David may be the two American actors least likely to say it. They are playing (and singing) the role of Paul Robeson in two separate plays on two separate Los Angeles stages. Their shared motivation is telling a story that is the ultimate retort to the idea that there's an unbridgeable gap between being a performer and living a serious life.
SPORTS
April 15, 2014 | By Chris Erskine
Dodgers fans seeking to voice their frustration or confusion over the team's TV standoff are invited to a rally on Wednesday at 6 p.m. at the Short Stop bar in Echo Park . Times “Fan of the House” columnist Chris Erskine will host the free event, and has invited fans to voice their concerns or raise questions on the situation. Among the issues: Is the controversial TV deal, in which 70% of the market cannot view the team's games on TV, the Dodgers' fault, or that of Time Warner Cable?
SPORTS
April 14, 2014 | From Times staff writers
The Dodgers and Major League Baseball declined to comment Monday about a magazine article detailing Yasiel Puig's dangerous escape from Cuba and the death threats the 23-year-old right fielder received last year from human traffickers under control of a major Mexican drug cartel. Through a team spokesman, Puig also declined to comment on the story, which is scheduled to run in the May issue of Los Angeles Magazine. Puig has never talked about how he left Cuba. The Dodgers and MLB wouldn't say what measures they have taken to ensure the safety of Puig and his teammates, though the club is known to have hired full-time security detail last year.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 14, 2014 | By Ben Welsh, David Zahniser, Emily Alpert Reyes
Los Angeles Mayor Eric Garcetti's first proposed budget calls for hiring 140 firefighters and the start of a sweeping overhaul of the city's 911 dispatch system, part of a bid to speed the response to hundreds of thousands of calls for help each year. The revamped dispatch operation, outlined Monday by the mayor's office as it presented an $8.1-billion spending plan for the coming fiscal year, would unify separate police and fire emergency call centers and gradually replace some uniformed firefighters with lower-paid civilian phone operators.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 10, 2014 | By August Brown
Last month, the EDM-focused speakers' series IMS Engage announced its first round of lecturers , including Moby, David Lynch, Junkie XL and Hans Zimmer. Now they've expanded the roster with rap and disco legends. Sean "Diddy" Combs, the MC and entertainment mogul, will join his new collaborator Guy Gerber for a discussion about their new collaborative project, 11 11. Their new music together is surprisingly experimental house, and much closer to Gerber's catalog then the mainstream hip-hop work Diddy is most known for (though Diddy has long been a presence on the Miami electronica club scene, and his "white parties" attract top DJ talent)
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 12, 1998
Why is there a problem with bilingual education? In Lebanon, where I was born of Armenian parents, I was obligated to learn Armenian, Arabic, English and French. I have already learned Spanish as a fifth language. Spanish helps me sell better to my Spanish-speaking customers in my store. North America is basically English-speaking; to the south it's basically Spanish. So, instead of bilingual education being a problem, why not make it a solution? Make Spanish and English mandatory, starting in kindergarten.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 20, 1989
It is ludicrous for Congress to ask for a 50% raise. This is the Congress which has refused for eight years to raise the minimum wage from $3.35. This is the Congress, which in the name of tackling the deficit, has cut the pay of Medicare workers and has cut back in other areas. This is the Congress which must make hard decisions in the future about the financial future of many. They look stupid to the average American family making $29,000 a year for tacking on such a huge pay increase for themselves, and it is insidious that they should do it in such a way. If there is a problem with some members taking unwarranted speaking fees, they should simply prohibit those speaking engagements.
NATIONAL
April 9, 2014 | By Maria L. La Ganga
SEATTLE - A broken leg. A shattered ankle. A broken arm. A fractured eye socket. And a memory of terror that will be with her forever, its soundtrack an "unexplainable" noise "that will never get out of my head. " That is what Amanda Skorjanc, 25, remembers after the March 22 Oso landslide that destroyed her home, almost wiped her little town off the map and nearly killed her infant son, Duke Suddarth, who was 22 weeks old when the disaster struck. At least 36 people were killed and 10 others remain missing.
OPINION
April 6, 2014 | By The Times editorial board
Members of the Los Angeles County Board of Supervisors are typically reelected every four years with token opposition at most, and in former days they explained away this phenomenon by arguing that voters were so satisfied with their performance that there was a general consensus that things were going well. The lack of serious challengers, they asserted, was proof that democracy was working. That argument is so twisted as to need little serious discussion. Supervisors are consistently reelected in this county of more than 10 million people because it's nearly impossible to unseat them regardless of their performance.
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