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Special Assessment Districts

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 31, 1991
Normally this is a quiet time for school districts, but in this summer of gloomy weather--and a gloomy economy--many residents are anything but quiet. In Orange County, district meetings have been alive with the angry sounds of tax revolt, as desperate school trustees have created or contemplated special assessment districts. The idea is to provide new taxes to pay for building repairs or recreational facilities.
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OPINION
February 6, 2000
The presidential candidates' promises of tax cuts for the poor are hollow. Those near and below the so-called "poverty level" rarely pay any income taxes--the special interest of the upper and middle classes only. The only tax cutting that will help all people--especially the poor, for whom they are an unconscionable drain on their lives--is the elimination of sales and use and other taxes masquerading as license fees, surcharges and "special assessment districts," the typical bureaucracy-enhancing political plunder that brought the British empire to its knees 225 years ago. JIM GREAVES Santa Barbara
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 22, 1992
In Westminster, three are vying for the mayor's seat, six for the two-year seat vacated by Councilwoman Joy L. Neugebauer and five for the other two seats available on the City Council in the Nov. 3 election. Mayor Regina Hardin Age: Not given. Occupation: Homemaker; businesswoman. Background: Involved in PTA and community activities in Huntington Beach.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 29, 1997 | KATE FOLMAR, TIMES STAFF WRITER
With a Tuesday deadline looming, officials across Ventura County are huddling with consultants and staff lawyers, polling property owners and plugging budgetary leaks to comply with California's latest anti-tax salvo. Spurred by Proposition 218, city leaders from Simi Valley to Ventura and Moorpark to Ojai are taking a close look at an obscure device used to raise money for street repairs, parks, lighting and landscaping--the special assessment district. Their conclusions?
OPINION
February 6, 2000
The presidential candidates' promises of tax cuts for the poor are hollow. Those near and below the so-called "poverty level" rarely pay any income taxes--the special interest of the upper and middle classes only. The only tax cutting that will help all people--especially the poor, for whom they are an unconscionable drain on their lives--is the elimination of sales and use and other taxes masquerading as license fees, surcharges and "special assessment districts," the typical bureaucracy-enhancing political plunder that brought the British empire to its knees 225 years ago. JIM GREAVES Santa Barbara
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 4, 1995 | FRANK MANNING
The city of Calabasas is considering creation of a special assessment district to raise $10 million to revamp streets in the western part of the city to accommodate a growing volume of traffic. The City Council will vote at 7:30 p.m. Thursday at City Hall on whether to hire a financial consultant to study the idea.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 11, 1993 | PEGGY Y. LEE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A Ventura businessman on Wednesday filed a lawsuit against the city, alleging that the Ventura City Council has improperly imposed a special tax on downtown merchants to raise money for promoting the area to tourists. The assessments--which average $135 a year for each business--were levied last month amid strong opposition from nearly half of the 363 merchants and business owners in downtown Ventura.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 26, 1991
To offset beach maintenance costs, Port Hueneme recently imposed a special assessment of $66 to $184 a year on beach-area homeowners, based on their view of and proximity to the ocean. The assessment is unprecedented in California. Should property owners pay an extra tax for beach upkeep based on their proximity to the shore? Jerry Sanford, Ventura County assessor I have a very large concern with that.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 22, 1997 | BILL BOYARSKY
As I rode up Turnbull Canyon Road in a Los Angeles County firetruck, winding through the dry, brush-covered Whittier Hills, I could see the threat facing the intricate firefighting network that permits us to live in this arid, combustible Southland. Until that moment, I hadn't fully understood our situation, not even after attending a rally staged by county firefighters urging a yes vote June 3 on Proposition E, a tax to raise more than $50 million for the county Fire Department.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 16, 1994 | DAVID W. FLEMING, David W. Fleming is an attorney with Latham & Watkins, vice president of the Los Angeles City Board of Fire Commissioners and a past chairman of the Valley Industry and Commerce Assn.
The acronym is EMS. It stands for the emergency medical service which the city provides you and your family when you phone 911. Los Angeles Fire Department paramedics arrive on the scene to help you--fast!--most of the time. Nearly all the 104 operating fire stations in the city were positioned to serve densely populated areas. In central parts of the city, fire stations tend to be closer to one another than elsewhere. Their normal response times are within the department's goals.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 26, 1997 | JOSH MEYER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Two very different political campaigns are quietly unfolding across the vast reaches of Los Angeles County, where voters are being asked to go to the polls June 3 to pay for $62 million worth of important services threatened by the passage of tax-cutting Proposition 218. Unlike other recent elections, there are no slick TV ads or even radio spots for either of the two ballot initiatives.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 22, 1997 | BILL BOYARSKY
As I rode up Turnbull Canyon Road in a Los Angeles County firetruck, winding through the dry, brush-covered Whittier Hills, I could see the threat facing the intricate firefighting network that permits us to live in this arid, combustible Southland. Until that moment, I hadn't fully understood our situation, not even after attending a rally staged by county firefighters urging a yes vote June 3 on Proposition E, a tax to raise more than $50 million for the county Fire Department.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 3, 1996 | ERIC WAHLGREN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Capping more than 10 years of talk about a new bridge over the Ventura Freeway at Rose Avenue, Oxnard leaders took the first steps in a $15.8-million financing plan Tuesday that should enable the city to build a six-lane overpass by 2000. The City Council voted 4 to 0 to begin setting up a special assessment district that will ask business and property owners to help pay for construction on the basis of how much traffic their developments generate. Councilman Dean Maulhardt was absent.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 12, 1996 | ERIC WAHLGREN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
City officials and a developer have agreed to postpone consideration of a massive retail complex on Rose Avenue until they resolve how to pay for a freeway overpass that would bring customers there. At a meeting tonight, the City Council is expected to delay a ruling on the 120,000-square-foot Shopping at the Rose II. On Wednesday, the city will hold a public hearing on a possible revenue source for the new $16.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 4, 1995 | FRANK MANNING
The city of Calabasas is considering creation of a special assessment district to raise $10 million to revamp streets in the western part of the city to accommodate a growing volume of traffic. The City Council will vote at 7:30 p.m. Thursday at City Hall on whether to hire a financial consultant to study the idea.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 16, 1994 | DAVID W. FLEMING, David W. Fleming is an attorney with Latham & Watkins, vice president of the Los Angeles City Board of Fire Commissioners and a past chairman of the Valley Industry and Commerce Assn.
The acronym is EMS. It stands for the emergency medical service which the city provides you and your family when you phone 911. Los Angeles Fire Department paramedics arrive on the scene to help you--fast!--most of the time. Nearly all the 104 operating fire stations in the city were positioned to serve densely populated areas. In central parts of the city, fire stations tend to be closer to one another than elsewhere. Their normal response times are within the department's goals.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 29, 1997 | KATE FOLMAR, TIMES STAFF WRITER
With a Tuesday deadline looming, officials across Ventura County are huddling with consultants and staff lawyers, polling property owners and plugging budgetary leaks to comply with California's latest anti-tax salvo. Spurred by Proposition 218, city leaders from Simi Valley to Ventura and Moorpark to Ojai are taking a close look at an obscure device used to raise money for street repairs, parks, lighting and landscaping--the special assessment district. Their conclusions?
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 26, 1997 | JOSH MEYER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Two very different political campaigns are quietly unfolding across the vast reaches of Los Angeles County, where voters are being asked to go to the polls June 3 to pay for $62 million worth of important services threatened by the passage of tax-cutting Proposition 218. Unlike other recent elections, there are no slick TV ads or even radio spots for either of the two ballot initiatives.
NEWS
May 23, 1993
The City Council is considering a proposal to form a special assessment district that would cost each homeowner $39.97 a year. Twenty-five of the 30 people who spoke on the proposed district at Monday's council meeting opposed it. The $900,000 assessment district would pay for street lighting and landscaping. Every property owner would be required to contribute. The assessment was calculated not on property value but on benefits received, said David Dong, director of management services.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 11, 1993 | PEGGY Y. LEE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A Ventura businessman on Wednesday filed a lawsuit against the city, alleging that the Ventura City Council has improperly imposed a special tax on downtown merchants to raise money for promoting the area to tourists. The assessments--which average $135 a year for each business--were levied last month amid strong opposition from nearly half of the 363 merchants and business owners in downtown Ventura.
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