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Special Bond

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ENTERTAINMENT
March 26, 2010 | By Greg Braxton
Robert Culp and Bill Cosby knew they were taking a risk in the mid-1960s when the actors teamed up as globe-trotting spies in "I Spy." The NBC series was the first drama in American television to feature an African American actor in a lead role. But making history ultimately was secondary to their impact on each other, according to Cosby, who spoke warmly about his former costar who died unexpectedly this week after taking a fall near his Hollywood Hills home. The men developed a personal bond that extended far beyond their on-screen partnership, and their two-member secret society puzzled, even exasperated, their wives.
ARTICLES BY DATE
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 8, 2013 | Steve Lopez
Building 215 at the West L.A. Veterans Administration medical facility is called the Home for Heroes, and nobody can say the two guys in Room 211 don't qualify. Bernie Tuvman, 90, and Phil Nadler, 87, have stories ripped from the World War II history books. Tuvman, a gunner, bailed over Germany after his B-17 took enemy fire, and he was a prisoner of war for nearly two years at Stalag 17B in Austria. Nadler, a copilot, was on a mission over Manila Bay when an enemy shell hit the nose of his amphibious plane.
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HOME & GARDEN
March 21, 2009 | Craig Nakano
If the letter from Sherry Steinberg of Santa Monica read like some love story, that's because it was. "I met Lucy in the spring of 1963," began Steinberg's note, submitted after the Home section asked readers to share their stories about the bond between housekeeper and homeowner. Dozens of readers weighed in, describing how a cleaning lady or nanny had become like a sibling, parent or best friend.
NATIONAL
January 16, 2011 | By Seema Mehta, Los Angeles Times
She called out in her sleep. "Christina, Christina!" Bill Hileman could feel the torment in his wife's dreams. "Hold my hand," his wife shouted in her uneasy slumber. "Keep your eyes on me, baby. " Suzi Hileman, 58, lay in the hospital bed with serious wounds. In her dreams, Suzi kept reliving the last moments before she lost consciousness: lying on her side in a parking lot, face-to-face with her 9-year-old neighbor, Christina-Taylor Green, whom she had taken that day to meet their congresswoman, Gabrielle Giffords.
WORLD
February 25, 2008 | Tina Susman, Times Staff Writer
Staff Sgt. Iron quakes with fear at the sound of explosions. He brawls with other soldiers. He whines when he doesn't get his way and slows others down when he stops to relieve himself during patrols through hostile territory. But nobody complains, because when it's time to enter a building that might be rigged to explode, or cross a pasture that could conceal a minefield, Iron is at the front of the line, making sure it's safe for those who follow.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 1, 2001 | MARGARET TALEV, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Tracy Knizek and Greg Williams boarded the squid boat Meridian at Channel Islands Harbor on Wednesday, a sister and brother on a bittersweet mission. It was a year to the day since their parents died in the crash of Alaska Airlines Flight 261. A year since the crew of this 32-foot boat joined a hopeless rescue effort eight miles off the coast, fishing up one small treasure in so much ruin: their father's prized Masonic ring.
SPORTS
January 23, 1993
I'm glad I don't share that same "special bond" with my father that Ken Norton and his son, Ken Norton Jr., share (Jan. 16). The only bond they share is stubbornness. ROBERT FARRELL Camarillo
ENTERTAINMENT
July 30, 1989
The superficiality of Hollywood continually amazes me. Gregg Kilday writes at length about the close friendship between Billy Crystal and Rob Reiner, about their special bond, in his July 16 article, "When Billy Met Rob." The article then discusses why it took director Reiner so long to cast Crystal in his new picture, "When Harry Met Sally. . . ." After balking at script changes requested by Richard Dreyfuss, whom Reiner wanted for the role, and "after considering a long list of actors, (Reiner)
NEWS
April 16, 1995
Carol Saline's sister is Patsy. Sharon J. Wohlmuth's sister is Beth. The journalist and the photographer joined forces to explore what they know: Sisterhood is one of the most powerful relationships a woman can have. In "Sisters" (Running Press, 1994) they capture kinswomen of all sorts. Like Anna Margaret Kale, above, making plans for new sister Hannah Marie. Or the Cunninghams--Katie, Charlene and Julie--all battling breast cancer. And bride-to-be Linda with Susan Karlin.
BUSINESS
May 6, 1989 | Carla Lazzareschi
QUESTION: Several years ago, my husband received a chain letter directing him to send a $50 U.S. savings bond to the person at the top of the list. Not understanding the deception of this scheme, my husband bought the bond. But he never mailed it. Now we are wondering if we can change the name on the bond to our name so we can cash it in. How can we do this?--L. G. P. ANSWER: First of all, the Bureau of the Public Debt takes an exceedingly dim view of chain letter schemes involving savings bonds.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 26, 2010 | By Greg Braxton
Robert Culp and Bill Cosby knew they were taking a risk in the mid-1960s when the actors teamed up as globe-trotting spies in "I Spy." The NBC series was the first drama in American television to feature an African American actor in a lead role. But making history ultimately was secondary to their impact on each other, according to Cosby, who spoke warmly about his former costar who died unexpectedly this week after taking a fall near his Hollywood Hills home. The men developed a personal bond that extended far beyond their on-screen partnership, and their two-member secret society puzzled, even exasperated, their wives.
HOME & GARDEN
March 21, 2009 | Craig Nakano
If the letter from Sherry Steinberg of Santa Monica read like some love story, that's because it was. "I met Lucy in the spring of 1963," began Steinberg's note, submitted after the Home section asked readers to share their stories about the bond between housekeeper and homeowner. Dozens of readers weighed in, describing how a cleaning lady or nanny had become like a sibling, parent or best friend.
WORLD
February 25, 2008 | Tina Susman, Times Staff Writer
Staff Sgt. Iron quakes with fear at the sound of explosions. He brawls with other soldiers. He whines when he doesn't get his way and slows others down when he stops to relieve himself during patrols through hostile territory. But nobody complains, because when it's time to enter a building that might be rigged to explode, or cross a pasture that could conceal a minefield, Iron is at the front of the line, making sure it's safe for those who follow.
NEWS
February 10, 2008 | Ker Munthit, Associated Press
Being responsible parents, rice farmer Khuorn Sam Ol and his wife might be expected to stop their child from playing with a 16-foot-long, 220-pound snake. Yet they don't mind that their 7-year-old son, Uorn Sambath, regularly sleeps in the massive coil of a female python, rides the reptile, kisses it and even pats it down with baby powder. "There is a special bond between them," Khuorn Sam Ol explained. "My son played with the snake when he was still learning to crawl. They used to sleep together in a cradle."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 9, 2007 | Tracy Weber, Times Staff Writer
For 50 years Linda Sue Brown's nine siblings fiercely protected her, facing down anyone who would taunt her or seek to exploit the disability that left her with the mental capacity of a 12-year-old. That sense of responsibility only grew after their 81-year-old mother, Brown's lifelong caretaker, was stricken with Alzheimer's disease, leaving her unable to tend to her daughter.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 26, 2006 | Tony Perry, Times Staff Writer
Elena Zurheide was sitting on her in-laws' couch, cradling her infant son, when an achingly familiar story on the television news grabbed her attention. Another local Marine had been killed in Iraq -- meaning another young widow, another fatherless newborn. And another wake. In an instant she made a decision. She would attend the wake for Cpl. Jeffrey Lawrence, who, like Zurheide's husband, had been on his second tour of duty.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 10, 1989
I've always liked Gloria McColl, and I have considered her a well-meaning, nice lady. No more. Her nasty attack on John Hartley and his name change is just that: nasty! (San Diego at Large, Aug. 30.) I remember a few years ago, John told me of his name change and how much it meant to his grandfather. They were especially close after John's parents divorced, remarried and had additional children. His grandfather's handsome picture was always hung over his desk, and I know it reminds him daily of their special bond.
NEWS
December 19, 1993 | IRIS YOKOI
Kenneth Ogrin, co-owner of the popular Redwood 2nd Street Saloon near the Civic Center, died Dec. 9 at his home in West Hills. He was 49. Police said he was found with a gunshot wound in the head and a gun in his hand. Ogrin had been a partner in the restaurant and bar at 316 W. 2nd St. for eight years, according to co-owner Larry Mascari. Ogrin was "always very up and optimistic about everything" and well liked by customers, Mascari said.
SPORTS
February 16, 2006 | Ben Bolch, Times Staff Writer
Tim Floyd arranged for Rob Brooks to receive a college scholarship, meet an NBA general manager and attend a Laker game. Just a few appreciative gestures from the USC coach to his head team manager? Hardly. All these acts of kindness occurred several years ago, when Floyd coached in the NBA and Brooks was a high school student in Orange County.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 12, 2005 | Steve Chawkins, Times Staff Writer
One morning in 1990, the phone rang in the home of Macaulay Culkin, the then 9-year-old acting sensation fresh off his star turn in the first "Home Alone" film. Culkin picked up the receiver and discovered a kindred spirit: a 32-year-old man who a couple of decades before had been just like him -- an achingly cute boy with a domineering father and a wildly successful career in show business.
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