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NEWS
January 29, 1986 | United Press International
Former U.S. Atty. Gen. Benjamin Civiletti has been hired by the state of Rhode Island as special counsel to head the impeachment of state Supreme Court Chief Justice Joseph Bevilacqua for associating with criminals.
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ENTERTAINMENT
April 11, 2014 | By David Ng
San Diego Opera has enlisted the spin expertise of Mark Fabiani -- the  former deputy mayor of Los Angeles and former special counsel to President Bill Clinton -- to handle the company's public relations as it faces mounting criticism over its decision to shut down. A PR man with a long roster of prominent clients, Fabiani was an ascendant L.A. politician during the '80s. He served as the chief of staff under L.A. Mayor Tom Bradley and also took on the role of deputy mayor. Fabiani later served as special counsel to President Clinton, advising him on the Whitewater scandal and other matters.
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NEWS
April 13, 1989 | From Associated Press
A Massachusetts congressman and the special counsel to the House Ethics Committee were robbed by an armed man near the Sup-reme Court, police reported Wednesday. Rep. Chester G. Atkins (S-Mass.) and Richard J. Phelan, the special counsel, were approached late Tuesday by a man armed with a revolver who demanded their wallets, U.S. Capitol police said. After the men complied, the robber fled on foot. Neither victim was injured.
OPINION
January 31, 2014
Re "Gay marriage, in court again," Editorial, Jan. 29 With the Proposition 8 case last year, the Supreme Court might well have been forced to rule on the constitutionality of same-sex marriage bans. Instead, Gov. Jerry Brown and Atty. Gen. Kamala Harris refused to do their duty and defend the law, thus giving the justices an easy out by finding that those arguing for Proposition 8 had no standing. Perhaps Brown and Harris could have kept their hands clean with the appointment of a special counsel to represent the 52% of voters who passed the proposition.
NEWS
May 27, 1986 | Associated Press
A special federal court announced today that an independent counsel would be appointed to investigate the lobbying activities of former White House deputy chief of staff Michael K. Deaver. The court gave no time schedule for the appointment. Deaver himself has asked that a special counsel be named to resolve questions of whether he has violated government conflict-of-interest rules in connection with his lobbying activities on behalf of the government of Canada and others.
NEWS
April 18, 1997 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Atty. Gen. Janet Reno brushed aside Republican criticism of her refusal to seek an independent counsel to investigate Democratic campaign fund-raising. "I'm damned if I do and damned if I don't, and so the best thing I can do is ignore the politics, ignore the pressures from both sides . . . and just call it like I see it," she told her weekly news conference, defending her decision to leave the expanding probe in the hands of career Justice Department prosecutors and FBI agents.
NEWS
December 7, 1995 | GLENN F. BUNTING, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In a stinging rebuke, the House Ethics Committee on Wednesday found that Speaker Newt Gingrich had violated House rules by misusing official resources and voted unanimously to hire a special counsel to investigate allegations that he improperly used tax-deductible donations to finance his teaching of a college course. The committee, after nearly a year of stalled secret negotiations, issued a strongly worded, three-page letter to the Georgia Republican criticizing his conduct.
OPINION
January 16, 2002 | SAMUEL DASH, Samuel Dash, a professor of law at Georgetown University Law Center, was chief counsel to the Senate Watergate Committee and ethics counsel to the independent counsel investigation on Whitewater.
The fast developing Enron story has now reached Washington scandal status. Adding to the frenzy, some Democratic leaders sound as though they regret the demise of the independent counsel legislation, something most of them applauded when it happened in 1999. If that legislation had not expired, these critics would have been able to demand that the Bush administration request an independent counsel and then make political hay when the administration refused.
BUSINESS
February 4, 2011 | By Ken Bensinger, Los Angeles Times
A Texas judge has named a special counsel to investigate whether Toyota Motor Corp. intentionally hid evidence during a 2006 lawsuit involving a woman paralyzed when her Camry rolled over. Johnson County District Court Judge John E. Neill appointed J. Gregory Coontz to the job, giving him power to probe whether Toyota violated a court order in the case, which was settled in 2007 for $1.5 million. The judge took the unusual step after reviewing internal documents provided by a former Toyota lawyer who managed rollover litigation for the company and subsequently claimed that the automaker intentionally held back safety data in lawsuits.
NEWS
January 28, 1994 | From Associated Press
The federal government signed a three-year lease Thursday for office space for special counsel Robert B. Fiske Jr., who will investigate President and Mrs. Clinton's dealings with a real estate developer and savings and loan owner. The 6,491 square feet of office space leased for Fiske and his staff in an office building in west Little Rock is on the same floor as the local FBI office.
NEWS
June 11, 2013 | By Richard A. Serrano
WASHINGTON - B. Todd Jones, the acting director of the ATF who took over the agency in its meltdown with the Fast and Furious scandal, ran into immediate opposition Tuesday as he appeared before the Senate Judiciary Committee for consideration as permanent director. Republicans sought to block or delay the appointment until an internal investigation can be completed of Jones' performance as the U.S. attorney in Minnesota. Indeed, since Jones was nominated late last year to head the federal Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms and Explosives, his chances of success have been difficult to gauge.
NEWS
June 26, 2012 | By Morgan Little
WASHINGTON -- A group of 31 senators signed a letter to Atty. Gen. Eric H. Holder Jr. Tuesday requesting the appointment of a special counsel to oversee the investigation into the source of a series of national security leaks that were eventually published by the New York Times . In a letter circulated by Sen. Lindsey Graham (R-S.C.), the senators called the leaks "stunning" and said: "If there were ever a case requiring an outside special counsel with bipartisan acceptance and widespread public trust, this is it. " The scandal was prompted by two New York Times reports, which exposed U.S. cyber attacks against Iran and the White House's secret "kill list.
NATIONAL
March 16, 2012 | By Richard A. Serrano and Kim Murphy, Los Angeles Times
A team of government lawyers prosecuting Sen. Ted Stevens of Alaska never fully reviewed evidence that could have bolstered his defense, was inadequately supervised, and withheld information that would have "seriously damaged the testimony and credibility of the government's key witness," a special counsel said in a report released Thursday. But Washington lawyer Henry F. Schuelke III stopped short of urging criminal misconduct charges against the prosecutors because, he said, the judge in the case never specifically ordered prosecutors to turn over material helpful to the defense.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 26, 2012 | Dennis McLellan, Los Angeles Times
Harry C. McPherson Jr., who served as special counsel and chief speechwriter for President Lyndon Johnson from 1966 to '69 and was a valued advisor to the president on civil rights, the Vietnam War and other policy issues, has died. He was 82. McPherson, who later became a prominent Washington lawyer and lobbyist, died Feb. 16 of complications of cancer at Suburban Hospital in Bethesda, Md., said Hedrick Smith, a family friend. "Harry McPherson was a 'can do' man with sound judgment and treasured loyalty who could be counted on by generations of Johnsons," Luci Baines Johnson, the president's youngest daughter, said in a statement.
NATIONAL
November 9, 2011 | By David S. Cloud, Washington Bureau
The Air Force said Tuesday that it had disciplined three top officials at the military's main mortuary in Delaware for "gross mismanagement" after finding that they twice lost track of body parts of U.S. troops killed in Afghanistan, and cut off a deceased Marine's arm bone without his family's consent. An 18-month Air Force investigation said the three officials failed to take action "despite indications that procedures were inadequate" for tracking human remains at the Dover Air Force Base mortuary, which has handled most of the more than 6,000 U.S. service members killed in Iraq and Afghanistan over the last decade.
NEWS
August 26, 2011 | By Kim Geiger
Texas Gov. Rick Perry and former Massachusetts Gov. Mitt Romney have recently phoned New York businessman Donald Trump, who flirted last spring with the idea of running for the Republican presidential nomination and has held open the possibility of jumping into the 2012 presidential race if he doesn't like the eventual GOP choice.  That's according to Politico's James Hohmann , who broke the story Friday morning. Hohmann spoke with Michael Cohen, Trump's special counsel, who said Perry had called on “several occasions,” and two other sources who said Romney has recently phoned as well.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 18, 2011 | By Garrett Therolf, Los Angeles Times
Persistent management lapses and a poor use of technology continue to hobble Los Angeles County's child welfare system, and two high-profile child fatalities from last year have been newly tied to the breakdowns, according to records and interviews. A special counsel acting for the Board of Supervisors has found that despite pledges to fix the problems, social workers still do not fully retrieve and evaluate case files electronically during home inspections. Not enough equipment is available, officials contend, and it often doesn't work.
BUSINESS
February 4, 2011 | By Ken Bensinger, Los Angeles Times
A Texas judge has named a special counsel to investigate whether Toyota Motor Corp. intentionally hid evidence during a 2006 lawsuit involving a woman paralyzed when her Camry rolled over. Johnson County District Court Judge John E. Neill appointed J. Gregory Coontz to the job, giving him power to probe whether Toyota violated a court order in the case, which was settled in 2007 for $1.5 million. The judge took the unusual step after reviewing internal documents provided by a former Toyota lawyer who managed rollover litigation for the company and subsequently claimed that the automaker intentionally held back safety data in lawsuits.
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