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WORLD
March 11, 2006 | From Times Wire Reports
China has created a special court to prosecute product piracy cases, a government spokesman said, amid demands for Beijing to step up action against rampant illegal copying of movies, music and software. China's supreme court has named a Judicial Court of Intellectual Property to handle such cases nationwide, court spokesman Sun Huapu said.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NATIONAL
July 29, 2013 | By David G. Savage
WASHINGTON - When the Foreign Intelligence Surveillance Court began in 1978, it was seen as a smart compromise aimed at protecting both national security and civil liberties. Before, the FBI under Director J. Edgar Hoover or the U.S. attorney general could use secret wiretaps to compile damaging dossiers on perceived enemies, including politicians and activists. Under the new law, the FBI or the CIA had to go before a judge of the special court if it wanted to wiretap an "agent of a foreign power" in this country, such as a Soviet spy. These days, the Foreign Intelligence Surveillance Court is more often seen as a good idea gone sour.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 27, 1988
Los Angeles Mayor Tom Bradley has urged the creation of a special court to handle gang and drug-related cases. In a letter to Superior Court Presiding Judge Richard Byrne, written July 14 and released Tuesday, Bradley said the special court would enable judges to better deal with repeat offenders. Los Angeles Superior Court Judge David Horowitz, who supervises the criminal courts, said that more than half the cases now handled in superior and municipal courtrooms are already drug-related.
OPINION
December 29, 2010
The Obama administration made it clear long ago that it intended to detain 48 Guantanamo inmates indefinitely and without trial. We have been critical of that policy both because the right to a trial is central to American notions of due process and because the administration's criteria for indefinite detention are too broad. These are detainees the government considers too dangerous to be released, but who can't be tried because the evidence against them either wasn't preserved, was tainted by torture or doesn't link them to particular terrorist plots.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 26, 1985
City Councilman Howard Finn called Friday for a study on the feasibility of establishing a special court to handle only cases involving drug offenses. His proposal was referred by the council to its Police, Fire and Public Safety Committee for consideration. "A special court to handle all drug cases would ease the caseload of the regular court system and provide for increased effectiveness in handling drug-related cases," said Finn, who represents the northeast San Fernando Valley.
NEWS
September 2, 1986
Gunmen firing automatic weapons in a crowded bazaar killed the judge of a special anti-extremist court in India's Punjab state, police said. Police in Jullundur said that Judge R. P. Gaind, 50, was shot to death as he made a phone call and that the two attackers escaped on a motor scooter. Gaind had sat on a special court set up to deal with unrest in the northern Indian state, which has been torn by violence sparked by extremists seeking to establish an independent Sikh homeland.
OPINION
May 12, 2002
Re "Detractors Find Bush Has Issues," news analysis, May 6: Many thanks to The Times for informing its readers that the president actively participates in decision-making on foreign policy. President Bush must be diabolically brilliant to deceive the world with his veneer of utter simplicity. What genius, to avoid ever making a coherent statement in public unless it was written down for him in advance. To think that this brilliant tactician has deceived potential international foes with a supposed lifetime of partying and zero intellectual accomplishment, only to be uncovered by a hard-hitting article in The Times about the inner workings of the White House.
NATIONAL
July 29, 2013 | By David G. Savage
WASHINGTON - When the Foreign Intelligence Surveillance Court began in 1978, it was seen as a smart compromise aimed at protecting both national security and civil liberties. Before, the FBI under Director J. Edgar Hoover or the U.S. attorney general could use secret wiretaps to compile damaging dossiers on perceived enemies, including politicians and activists. Under the new law, the FBI or the CIA had to go before a judge of the special court if it wanted to wiretap an "agent of a foreign power" in this country, such as a Soviet spy. These days, the Foreign Intelligence Surveillance Court is more often seen as a good idea gone sour.
NEWS
January 23, 1985 | Associated Press
A Philippine government prosecutor charged the armed forces chief, Gen. Fabian C. Ver; two other generals, and 23 other men today in the double murder of opposition leader Benigno Aquino and the man the army had claimed was his assassin. Brig. Gen. Luther Custodio, chief of aviation security, and 16 other soldiers were charged with direct participation in a military conspiracy to kill Aquino as he stepped off a plane Aug. 21, 1983, after three years of voluntary exile in the United States.
NEWS
January 22, 1988 | Associated Press
A federal appeals court today struck down as unconstitutional the judicial appointment of independent counsels to investigate alleged misconduct by high government officials. In a 2-1 decision that could overturn former White House aide Michael K. Deaver's recent perjury conviction, the U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals here agreed with a challenge holding that court appointment of special prosecutors violates the separation-of-powers doctrine.
WORLD
June 23, 2009 | Ramin Mostaghim and Borzou Daragahi
Iran's Guardian Council today ruled out the possibility of nullifying the country's disputed presidential election that returned hard-liner Mahmoud Ahmadinejad to power, saying it could find no evidence of any "major" irregularities, according to a report carried by the website of the state-owned English-language Press TV satellite news channel.
OPINION
February 25, 2009
The unsubstantiated belief that vaccines are to blame for increasing rates of autism has diverted too much attention from the quest to find the causes of this complex syndrome. Sadly, a decision by the nation's vaccine court won't make much difference to the very vocal parents who refuse to let this theory die. The court, which was set up to consider claims of harm caused by vaccines, ruled this month that inoculations did not cause the autism of three children, as their parents alleged.
WORLD
June 25, 2008 | Paul Watson, Times Staff Writer
Plagued by long delays and corruption allegations, the special court prosecuting Cambodia's former Khmer Rouge leaders on genocide charges is running short of money months before its first trial is set to start. The court, which was set up by the United Nations and Cambodia's government two years ago, needs $43.8 million to continue operating through 2009, administrators said Tuesday in Phnom Penh, the Cambodian capital.
WORLD
August 12, 2007 | Paul Watson, Times Staff Writer
taprum, cambodia -- Down a potholed dirt road from the Diamond Crown Hotel and Casino, where Thai low-rollers place their bets on blackjack and roulette, Brother No. 2 plays a waiting game with justice. Nuon Chea, the frail former right-hand man to the late tyrant Pol Pot, lives in a stilted house of rough-hewn planks on the Thai border, enjoying the quiet life of a retiree.
WORLD
March 11, 2006 | From Times Wire Reports
China has created a special court to prosecute product piracy cases, a government spokesman said, amid demands for Beijing to step up action against rampant illegal copying of movies, music and software. China's supreme court has named a Judicial Court of Intellectual Property to handle such cases nationwide, court spokesman Sun Huapu said.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 10, 2005 | Claire Luna, Times Staff Writer
To Joel, the choice was simple: Go to school and be ridiculed because he had a hard time reading or stay home and smoke pot with his friends. So the 16-year-old Santa Ana boy skipped hundreds of days in his first two years of high school, until ditching caught up with him and an Orange County judge gave him another simple choice -- school or jail. "I didn't want to get locked up," Joel said after a recent court appearance to check on his progress.
OPINION
December 29, 2010
The Obama administration made it clear long ago that it intended to detain 48 Guantanamo inmates indefinitely and without trial. We have been critical of that policy both because the right to a trial is central to American notions of due process and because the administration's criteria for indefinite detention are too broad. These are detainees the government considers too dangerous to be released, but who can't be tried because the evidence against them either wasn't preserved, was tainted by torture or doesn't link them to particular terrorist plots.
NATIONAL
August 23, 2002 | ERIC LICHTBLAU and JOSH MEYER, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
In a rare glimpse into the inner workings of one of the nation's most secretive courts, documents released Thursday show that the federal judges have voiced grave misgivings for years about the way the Justice Department has handled classified wiretaps and searches in terrorism cases.
NATIONAL
August 23, 2002 | ERIC LICHTBLAU and JOSH MEYER, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
In a rare glimpse into the inner workings of one of the nation's most secretive courts, documents released Thursday show that the federal judges have voiced grave misgivings for years about the way the Justice Department has handled classified wiretaps and searches in terrorism cases.
OPINION
May 12, 2002
Re "Detractors Find Bush Has Issues," news analysis, May 6: Many thanks to The Times for informing its readers that the president actively participates in decision-making on foreign policy. President Bush must be diabolically brilliant to deceive the world with his veneer of utter simplicity. What genius, to avoid ever making a coherent statement in public unless it was written down for him in advance. To think that this brilliant tactician has deceived potential international foes with a supposed lifetime of partying and zero intellectual accomplishment, only to be uncovered by a hard-hitting article in The Times about the inner workings of the White House.
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