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Special Envoy

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WORLD
December 12, 2010 | By Katherine Skiba, Los Angeles Times
Richard C. Holbrooke, the U.S. special envoy to Afghanistan and Pakistan, was in critical condition Saturday after undergoing surgery to repair a tear in his aorta, a State Department spokesman said. Holbrooke, 69, underwent surgery Saturday morning at George Washington University Hospital after becoming ill at the State Department the day before, spokesman Philip J. Crowley said. President Obama issued a statement Saturday evening saying he had spoken to Holbrooke's wife, author Kati Marton, and told her that he and first lady Michelle Obama were "praying for Richard.
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OPINION
June 28, 2013 | By The Times editorial board
President Obama's trip through sub-Saharan Africa this week appropriately elevates the region's prominence in the administration's pantheon of foreign policy priorities. Obama is using the tour to promote African democracies, encourage trade and appeal to young people - and, importantly, to dispel the criticism that his presidency has been so preoccupied with other parts of the world that it has given Africa short shrift. As he visits Senegal, South Africa and Tanzania, Obama has the opportunity to highlight some of the region's more vexing social and geopolitical issues.
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NEWS
June 26, 1987 | Associated Press
The United States will send a special envoy to Syria to discuss improving relations following secret communications between President Reagan and Syrian President Hafez Assad, a Reagan Administration official said today. Presidential spokesman Marlin Fitzwater said a letter was sent to Assad following the economic summit in Venice, Italy, where Reagan discussed the possible communications with British Prime Minister Margaret Thatcher. Assad accepted the offer for the envoy, Fitzwater said.
WORLD
August 2, 2012 | By Patrick J. McDonnell and Paul Richter, Los Angeles Times
BEIRUT - The resignation of Kofi Annan, the point man for international efforts to bring peace to Syria, emphatically confirmed what events there had already been making clear: The country's fate is far more likely to be decided by force than by negotiations. The former U.N. secretary-general's announcement Thursday that he was ending his attempt to negotiate an end to the conflict came amid a sharp increase in fighting that began last month after a bomb killed four top security aides to President Bashar Assad.
NEWS
May 9, 1986 | Associated Press
President Reagan said Thursday that he will nominate Harry W. Shlaudeman, formerly his special envoy to Central America and the top specialist on Latin America in the Foreign Service, to be U.S. ambassador to Brazil. Shlaudeman, 60, has served as ambassador to Venezuela, Peru and Argentina.
NEWS
April 27, 1994 | from A Times Staff Writer
The State Department released a terse statement Tuesday announcing the resignation of Lawrence Pezzullo, the U.S. special envoy to Haiti. Pezzullo was the author of a plan to restore ousted Haitian President Jean-Bertrand Aristide to power. But the effort succeeded only in creating a widening split between Aristide and the Clinton Administration.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 2, 1994
The political crisis in Haiti has gone on so frustratingly long that it would be easy to overlook a couple of small but significant signs of progress there recently for the Clinton Administration. Under the fresh leadership of William H.
NEWS
July 28, 1986 | SARA FRITZ, Times Staff Writer
President Reagan, under pressure to take further action against the white-led government of South Africa, is likely to renew existing economic sanctions in early September and may also designate Sen. Paul Laxalt (R-Nev.) as a special envoy to Pretoria, officials said Sunday. In response, South African Bishop Desmond Tutu said he will oppose the appointment of a special U.S.
NEWS
July 31, 1994 | GEORGE WHITE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Rev. Jesse Jackson returned Saturday from a White House-backed mission to Nigeria and called on President Clinton to appoint a special envoy to help resolve an increasingly violent political deadlock in that oil-rich West African nation. He called it a "combustible situation that may soon lead to civil war."
NEWS
April 14, 1994 | CAROL J. WILLIAMS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In the first signs that Bosnian Serbs may relax their campaign of belligerence that followed NATO air strikes, two Western mediators were received by rebel leaders Wednesday, and Russia's special envoy said he had won a Serbian promise to end the siege of Gorazde. Russian Deputy Foreign Minister Vitaly S.
WORLD
April 25, 2012 | By Los Angeles Times Staff
BEIRUT - The presence of United Nations-backed monitors in Syria is providing only brief respites from violence and in some cases may be making the situation worse, a spokesman for U.N. and Arab League special envoy Kofi Annan said Tuesday. Annan spokesman Ahmad Fawzi said the small advance team of monitors is facing great difficulty in stemming the fighting between forces loyal to President Bashar Assad and opposition groups. "When they leave, the exchanges start again," Fawzi told U.N. Television in Geneva, referring to the monitors.
WORLD
April 10, 2012 | By Rima Marrouch
BEIRUT - A peace plan deadline for pulling back government forces in Syria came and went Tuesday as attacks across much of the country continued, leaving the international community with little besides condemnation for the country's leadership. But in a show of optimism that seemed to defy the bloody situation in Syria, United Nations and Arab League special envoy Kofi Annan held out hope that a cease-fire might still be reached by Thursday as planned and that negotiations could begin between the government of President Bashar Assad and the opposition seeking Assad's ouster.
WORLD
March 31, 2012 | From a Times staff writer
BEIRUT -- Clashes and shelling were reported across Syria on Friday, even as the former secretary-general of the United Nations said he expected an immediate cease-fire by President Bashar Assad's forces. At least 45 people were killed nationwide in the violence, according to the Local Coordination Committees, a coalition of opposition activist groups. The killings, including 14 in the northeast city of Dair Alzour and 12 in the central city of Homs, took place amid large protests across the country by activists demanding action in the Arab world in support of their cause.
WORLD
March 10, 2012 | By Patrick J. McDonnell and Alexandra Sandels, Los Angeles Times
Former United Nations chief Kofi Annan is scheduled to be in Syria on Saturday on a special peace mission, but the veteran diplomat faces daunting obstacles in trying to craft a cease-fire in the almost yearlong conflict that has cost thousands of lives. Annan, a joint special envoy of the United Nations and the Arab League, will meet Saturday in Damascus, the Syrian capital, with President Bashar Assad, U.N. Secretary-General Ban Ki-moon told reporters Friday. On the eve of his trip, opposition activists reported scores more killed across Syria as the now-traditional Friday protests took place in many parts of the country.
WORLD
June 16, 2011 | By Patrick J. McDonnell, Los Angeles Times
A Russian envoy's trip to the Libyan capital Thursday yielded no major breakthroughs amid escalating international efforts to end the four-month-long crisis in Libya. Both Mikhail Margelov, Russia's special envoy to Africa, and Libyan Prime Minister Baghdadi Ali Mahmudi said the major issue — the future of Moammar Kadafi — remained unresolved. Kadafi "is not prepared to go," Margelov said he was told by Libyan officials, according to the Russian Interfax news agency. Later, Mahmudi repeatedly made the same point — that Kadafi has no intention of leaving Libya — during an almost two-hour news conference with foreign journalists.
WORLD
May 13, 2011 | By Paul Richter and Peter Nicholas, Los Angeles Times
Former Sen. George J. Mitchell is resigning as the Obama administration's special envoy for Middle East peace after a two-year effort failed to advance Israeli-Palestinian negotiations, White House officials said. Mitchell, acclaimed for his success in sealing a peace deal in Northern Ireland, began this mission optimistically but recently came to the conclusion that serious negotiations were a distant prospect and there was no need for him to continue, associates said. He had not visited the region since December.
NEWS
April 3, 1985 | United Press International
Alarmed by moves on Capitol Hill to enact protectionist legislation, Japan said today that it will send a special envoy to Washington in a bid to defuse a mounting trade dispute with the United States. A Foreign Ministry official said Reishi Teshima, deputy foreign minister for economic affairs, will leave Thursday for Washington "to explain the Japanese position" to U.S. officials "in view of recent moves in the Congress."
OPINION
December 16, 2010 | Doyle McManus
Richard C. Holbrooke, who died Monday at 69, was most often described in terms of his larger-than-life style. He had protean energy, bulldozer tenacity and an always visible ego, all of which he used in relentless pursuit of what he felt was America's duty: to try to fix the world's problems. But the last time I had a conversation with Holbrooke, he sounded frustrated. "How does this thing end? I don't know," he said last summer, talking about the overwhelming obstacles the U.S. faces in Afghanistan and Pakistan.
WORLD
March 12, 2011 | By Paul Richter and Henry Chu, Los Angeles Times
President Obama vowed Friday that the United States would continue "slowly tightening the noose" to force Libyan leader Moammar Kadafi from power, but also made it clear that the U.S. would proceed cautiously on any potential military operation. Obama, at a White House news conference, said his administration planned to name a special envoy to determine ways to assist the anti-Kadafi rebels. Secretary of State Hillary Rodham Clinton is scheduled to meet with representatives of the Libyan opposition during a trip next week to Europe and the Middle East.
OPINION
December 16, 2010 | Doyle McManus
Richard C. Holbrooke, who died Monday at 69, was most often described in terms of his larger-than-life style. He had protean energy, bulldozer tenacity and an always visible ego, all of which he used in relentless pursuit of what he felt was America's duty: to try to fix the world's problems. But the last time I had a conversation with Holbrooke, he sounded frustrated. "How does this thing end? I don't know," he said last summer, talking about the overwhelming obstacles the U.S. faces in Afghanistan and Pakistan.
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