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Special Interest Groups

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 29, 1992 | JACK CHEEVERS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Republican congressional contender Tom McClintock is benefiting from a surge of eleventh-hour campaign donations by special-interest groups, according to reports filed with the Federal Election Commission. Assemblyman McClintock's campaign took in at least $42,000 in the past two weeks, the reports said. Of that, $27,500--or 65%--came from groups representing beer wholesalers, realtors, chiropractors, insurance interests, gun owners and others. By comparison, his Democratic rival, Anthony C.
ARTICLES BY DATE
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 7, 2013 | By Anthony York
SACRAMENTO - While much of the country is gearing up for the holidays, political forces in Sacramento are girding for battle. Already, special interests are lined up with plans that could shape next year's general election ballot. They are considering propositions to increase medical malpractice awards, hike tobacco taxes and give local governments the right to scale back public employee pensions, among other ideas. Each of the proposals could spawn campaigns costing tens of millions of dollars.
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BUSINESS
September 8, 1989 | BRUCE KEPPEL, Times Staff Writer
Timber interests at odds with environmentalists threaten to boycott Stroh's beer unless the brewer withdraws funding for an Audubon Society television program. Environmentalists say they will boycott Hawaiian-grown macadamia nuts, pineapples, coffee and sugar unless a geothermal project in a rain forest on the Big Island is scrapped. Moralists prod advertisers to withdraw support for prime-time TV shows deemed overly violent, profane or sexy.
OPINION
July 8, 2011 | By Allan Luks
Among the many proposals to raise taxes and cut and reallocate government spending to regain our country's economic health, one of the most sensitive is decreasing the tax deductibility of charitable contributions. The independent Congressional Budget Office recently reviewed 11 options for revising the income tax treatment of charitable giving, and it grouped them into four categories. All establish a floor below which contributions would not be deductible. One proposal retained tax deductibility only for donations exceeding $1,000 per couple or, alternatively, 2% of a person's adjusted gross income.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 17, 1991 | ALAN C. MILLER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In the last hurrah for controversial speaking fees from special-interest groups, San Fernando Valley-area congressmen accepted a total of $172,473 in honorariums as well as dozens of expense-paid trips to such destinations as Palm Springs and Honolulu last year, according to 1990 financial disclosure reports. Leading the way was Rep. Henry A. Waxman (D-Los Angeles), who received $70,123 in honorariums.
NEWS
March 16, 1993 | PAUL HOUSTON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Almost without letup, the phone calls pour into Ilisa Halpern's headset as she sits in the office of Sen. Dianne Feinstein (D-Calif.), typing the caller's name, address and comments onto a computer screen. From a Sonoma woman upset about President Clinton's economic plan: "Very definitely not support it. President is pathological liar. Can't fool all of the people. Tired of listening to all of the rhetoric. Feinstein also a radical."
NEWS
November 2, 1999 | From Associated Press
In the two years between leaving the U.S. Senate and announcing his candidacy for president, Democrat Bill Bradley earned more than $2.5 million in speaking fees, much of it from special-interest groups, according to his income tax returns and financial disclosure statement released Monday. Bradley, who did not seek reelection to the Senate in 1996, reported earning $2.7 million for speeches in 1997 and 1998, the statements indicated.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 3, 1990 | JOANNA M. MILLER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
State Sen. Gary K. Hart warned Cal State University officials Thursday that they should move quickly to reach agreement on a site for a new university campus in the county or lose the state funds already appropriated to buy the land. Addressing the 30-member Cal State Site Selection Committee and the 50 people in the audience at a meeting in Oxnard, Hart said $7 million to buy a site somewhere in the county had been included in the new state budget signed Tuesday by Gov. George Deukmejian.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 30, 1992 | LYNDA NATALI, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
City Council candidate Harold Lindamood was surprised when he received the detailed questionnaires asking his opinions on abortion. It was not likely that topic would be tucked into the Cypress City Council agenda, among trash fee hikes and weed abatement. Why would someone even ask, he wondered. "They don't have anything to do with city elections," said Lindamood, a test pilot making his first try at elected office. "Basically I put them in a pile. . . . I didn't fill them out."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 28, 1992 | JACK CHEEVERS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Rep. Anthony C. Beilenson (D-Los Angeles) told an abortion-rights group to stop raising money for political flyers boosting his candidacy after the ads were questioned as a possible special-interest donation, his campaign manager said Tuesday.
OPINION
July 24, 2008
Every two years, a handful of California's Superior Court seats open up without the governor appointing new judges to fill them. Lawyers who are impatient with the appointment process, or don't believe they have a chance with the governor, or tried it and failed, take the other available course -- they ask voters to elect them to the bench. But voters struggle with a dearth of information about the candidates.
NATIONAL
February 14, 2008 | Tom Hamburger and Richard Simon, Times Staff Writers
Even though he has come under investigation for his ties to a lobbyist whose clients have benefited from millions of dollars in congressional earmarks, Rep. Jerry Lewis (R-Redlands) was among the top lawmakers securing money for special projects in this year's spending bills, a watchdog group's analysis has found. Lewis, the senior Republican on the House Appropriations Committee, secured $137 million in earmarks on his own or working with other lawmakers.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 5, 2007 | George Skelton
California's lead political watchdog won't mention names, but he strongly feels that the way some Sacramento politicians are raising and spending special interest money is plain wrong. He's new in the job as chairman of the state Fair Political Practices Commission, which enforces campaign finance and conflict-of-interest laws. But Ross Johnson, 68, is hardly a naive political neophyte.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 24, 2007 | George Skelton
It's hard to know whether to shout in anger or chuckle at the chutzpah. Perhaps we should just nod in respect to the clever tactics. Maybe all of the above. Bill Leonard, member of the state Board of Equalization, says: "My reaction is, 'I told you so.' " That's irresistible and I'll join him. Proposition 84 -- sold last year as a water protection bond -- was one of five special interest ballot initiatives crafted to spend and/or tax.
NATIONAL
November 12, 2006 | Peter Wallsten and Janet Hook, Times Staff Writers
After toppling the long-dominant Republicans in a hard-fought election, the Democratic Party's incoming congressional leaders have immediately found themselves in another difficult struggle -- with their own supporters.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 26, 2006 | Dan Morain, Times Staff Writer
Rich gambling interests and a Silicon Valley software giant are using their wealth to transform an otherwise sleepy statewide campaign into a major partisan battleground. With separate million-dollar infusions, a group of casino-owning Southern California Indian tribes and the software company Intuit are changing the complexion of the race for California state controller. In the process, they are underscoring the power of the post, which has vast sway over state tax policy.
NEWS
September 14, 1989 | PAUL JACOBS, Times Staff Writer
Dozens of narrowly drawn special-interest bills are moving quietly through the Legislature, swept along in a final crush of measures as lawmakers rush to end their 1989 session by midnight Friday. Among these largely unheralded bills--which have a way of slipping through with little debate or opposition--is one pushed by car dealers that would raise the fees they can charge customers for processing documents by $10 per vehicle.
NEWS
March 13, 1987 | RICHARD C. PADDOCK, Times Staff Writer
Assembly Speaker Willie Brown (D-San Francisco) received at least $124,000 in income and gifts last year from special interests that had business before the Legislature, according to official documents and interviews. One company, the Santa Fe Southern Pacific Corp., paid $58,000 to Brown's San Francisco law firm--in which he is the sole attorney and 100% owner--at the same time that the company reported lobbying the Legislature on 29 bills.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 20, 2006 | Dan Morain, Times Staff Writer
Political consultants and wealthy interest groups are skirting contribution caps and disclosure requirements as they pump millions of dollars into last-ditch attempts to sway the electorate. In some instances, donors are loading independent campaign war chests with six-figure checks -- far more than the law allows them to give directly to candidates. The money is paying for mailings and television ads that promote friendly politicians and attack others who may disagree with them.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 31, 2006 | Dan Morain, Times Staff Writer
Entertainment companies seeking a tax break, Staples Center owners hoping for a change in labor law, an ersatz Indian tribe angling for a casino: All are among the scores of donors writing checks to lawmakers in the final days of the legislative session. As those lawmakers cast final votes on hundreds of bills, moneyed interests directly affected by them are contributing hundreds of thousands of dollars.
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