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Special Interests Groups

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BUSINESS
July 31, 1992 | JOHN LIPPMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
It began as classic "pro-consumer" legislation. But the cable TV regulation bills that have been approved by both branches of Congress now bear the imprint of special interest groups as diverse as local broadcasters, Hollywood producers and even General Motors. When a compromise bill emerges from a conference committee--possibly as early as next week--provisions guaranteeing a financial windfall for local broadcasters and a bigger piece of the cable pie for movie producers could be included.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 7, 2013 | By Anthony York
SACRAMENTO - While much of the country is gearing up for the holidays, political forces in Sacramento are girding for battle. Already, special interests are lined up with plans that could shape next year's general election ballot. They are considering propositions to increase medical malpractice awards, hike tobacco taxes and give local governments the right to scale back public employee pensions, among other ideas. Each of the proposals could spawn campaigns costing tens of millions of dollars.
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NEWS
May 5, 1991 | JIM NEWTON and MARK LANDSBAUM, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
For the past 12 years, powerful special interests have taken advantage of a gaping loophole in Orange County's campaign reform ordinance to pour hundreds of thousands of dollars into the political war chests of county supervisors. By passing the money through unregulated political action committees, the groups have found ways to avoid registration requirements and sidestep a local conflict-of-interest ordinance known as TINCUP.
OPINION
July 8, 2011 | By Allan Luks
Among the many proposals to raise taxes and cut and reallocate government spending to regain our country's economic health, one of the most sensitive is decreasing the tax deductibility of charitable contributions. The independent Congressional Budget Office recently reviewed 11 options for revising the income tax treatment of charitable giving, and it grouped them into four categories. All establish a floor below which contributions would not be deductible. One proposal retained tax deductibility only for donations exceeding $1,000 per couple or, alternatively, 2% of a person's adjusted gross income.
NEWS
May 7, 1991 | JIM NEWTON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Leon Anderson gave $150 in 1986 to the campaign of Assemblyman Ross Johnson (R-La Habra), assuming that the whole contribution would go toward Johnson's reelection. Just last week, however, Anderson discovered that the assemblyman passed some of that money on to the 1986 supervisorial campaign of Don R. Roth. "I didn't know he'd done that," Anderson, a certified public accountant from Fullerton, said of Johnson.
NEWS
May 7, 1991 | JIM NEWTON
The campaign cash transfers that helped elect Don R. Roth to the Board of Supervisors and Robert L. Richardson to the Santa Ana City Council were legal in Orange County, but the same technique has been outlawed by some local governments. In San Diego, for instance, all such transfers have long been illegal under that city's rigorous campaign ordinance, which limits all contributions to $250 and mandates that they come only from individuals.
NEWS
May 10, 1991 | JIM NEWTON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Orange County's 12-year-old campaign-reform law is so convoluted, so riddled with loopholes that it "begs to be circumvented," says Costa Mesa lawyer Dana Reed, who specializes in campaign law. And circumvented it is, say critics from across the political spectrum and in a wide array of disciplines. In fact, nearly everyone associated with Orange County politics has some gripe with the way the county elects its supervisors.
NEWS
May 6, 1991 | JIM NEWTON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Suppose that you and your co-workers give the boss a couple thousand dollars every few months, just because you like him. And suppose that every year he gives you all a raise. Would company stockholders believe you earned those raises? Or might they suspect that you got them because you were so generous with the boss?
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 8, 1994 | JOHN M. GLIONNA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
For one mouthwatering moment, Kirk Cartozian thought he had arrived in finger-food heaven. There he was on Capitol Hill, among the hungry hordes attending a reception thrown by some California fresh chicken group. The lobbyists wanted to show lawmakers what a fresh chicken really tastes like, versus the rival frozen birds. And while Cartozian is no lawmaker--just a 20-year-old unpaid summer intern for Rep.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 7, 2013 | By Anthony York
SACRAMENTO - While much of the country is gearing up for the holidays, political forces in Sacramento are girding for battle. Already, special interests are lined up with plans that could shape next year's general election ballot. They are considering propositions to increase medical malpractice awards, hike tobacco taxes and give local governments the right to scale back public employee pensions, among other ideas. Each of the proposals could spawn campaigns costing tens of millions of dollars.
BOOKS
September 18, 2005 | Richard Lee Colvin, Richard Lee Colvin, a former education writer for The Times, directs the Hechinger Institute on Education and the Media at Columbia University's Teachers College.
ANYONE who appoints himself a myth-buster also, implicitly at least, claims to be an unbiased arbiter of evidence. Jay P. Greene, an ardent believer in the salutary effects of competition and privatization on education, is hardly that. In his new book, "Education Myths," Greene contends that the views of teachers, their unions, administrators and education professors carry undue weight in debates over how to improve U.S. public schools.
NATIONAL
December 29, 2004 | Peter Wallsten, Times Staff Writer
As President Bush campaigned for reelection pledging to protect doctors and insurance companies from patient lawsuits while easing the tax burden on businesses, industry groups spent record amounts of money lobbying to influence the White House, Congress and their constituents. Special interests spent $1.1 billion during the first half of 2004 on lobbyists and advertising campaigns, according to public records that interest groups are required to file with the Senate.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 24, 2004 | Dan Morain, Times Staff Writer
Assemblywoman Judy Chu has just learned the price of opposing a single piece of legislation: $87,199. That's what Los Angeles-area card casinos have spent in opposition to her reelection this fall -- even though there is virtually no chance Chu will lose her seat Nov. 2. The reason for the card clubs' ire: The San Gabriel Valley Democrat helped torpedo a bill that could have benefited them.
NATIONAL
January 30, 2004 | James Rainey and Eric Slater, Times Staff Writers
With personal appearances across three states and television ads in many more, the Democrats running for president searched Thursday for a locale where they could stop frontrunner John F. Kerry's momentum. Most focused on the seven caucuses and primaries that will be contested Tuesday, but Howard Dean made clear that he plans to make a stand in contests a few days later.
NATIONAL
January 23, 2004 | Maria L. La Ganga, Times Staff Writer
Since landing in New Hampshire early Tuesday, Sen. John F. Kerry has spent much of his time looking beyond Tuesday's primary -- a contest that once loomed as a potential make-or-break for his Democratic presidential bid. Compared with his breakneck campaign pace in weeks leading up to the Iowa caucuses -- six or seven events each day, hundreds of miles covered by bus and helicopter -- Kerry has cut back significantly on public appearances in New Hampshire.
NATIONAL
January 9, 2004 | Matea Gold, Times Staff Writer
Democratic presidential candidate Howard Dean, one of the top contenders in the Jan. 19 Iowa caucuses, said four years ago that the contest was a flawed process overly influenced by special interests. Dean made those comments, and others that now could stir controversy, during a series of appearances on a Canadian political television program, excerpts of which were broadcast by NBC Thursday night. As governor of Vermont from 1991 to 2003, Dean appeared frequently on the show.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 15, 1985 | RALPH FRAMMOLINO, Times Staff Writer
Members of homosexual, black, Latino, neighborhood, environmental and labor groups--constituencies on which Mayor Roger Hedgecock has depended for political power--said Thursday they will remain loyal to the mayor, who continues to be their strongest hope to have a hand in city government decisions.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 29, 1992 | JACK CHEEVERS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Republican congressional contender Tom McClintock is benefiting from a surge of eleventh-hour campaign donations by special-interest groups, according to reports filed with the Federal Election Commission. Assemblyman McClintock's campaign took in at least $42,000 in the past two weeks, the reports said. Of that, $27,500--or 65%--came from groups representing beer wholesalers, realtors, chiropractors, insurance interests, gun owners and others. By comparison, his Democratic rival, Anthony C.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 6, 2001 | PATRICK McGREEVY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Candidates for a Los Angeles City Council seat sparred Wednesday at their last forum before Tuesday's election over such issues as how to rein in development and expand green space. The debate at the Ebell Club was held on the same day a landlord group, the Apartment Assn. of Greater Los Angeles, began airing radio commercials opposing former state Sen. David Roberti's candidacy for the 4th District seat and supporting attorney Beth Garfield and private school owner Fares Wehbe.
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