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Special Order

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OPINION
December 23, 2009 | Tim Rutten
Over the last few weeks, Los Angeles Police Chief Charlie Beck twice has reaffirmed the department's commitment to Special Order 40, the 30-year-old policy that forbids officers from making routine inquiries about the immigration status of people they encounter or detain. The contexts and manner of Beck's affirmation suggest a couple of interesting -- and significant -- differences between the new chief's approach and that of his predecessor, William Bratton. Even after three decades, Special Order 40 remains the most controversial of LAPD's policing policies, as well as one of its most vital.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 17, 2013 | By Joel Rubin
A state appeals court late Wednesday set aside a lower court's ruling that struck down the Los Angeles Police Department's vehicle impound rules. The decision by a panel of three justices from the California Court of Appeal cleared the way for Police Chief Charlie Beck to reinstate the controversial impound policy he put in place last year to be more lenient on immigrants in the country illegally. In a statement Thursday, Beck said the policy, called Special Order 7, would be put back into place "immediately.
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OPINION
April 14, 2005
Beware of local cops playing federal immigration officers. That's generally a lose-lose proposition, diminishing the ability of mistrusted police to fight crime in immigrant communities while subjecting Latinos, including American citizens, to a new type of ethnic profiling, a blanket "reasonable suspicion" for cops to stop foreign-looking individuals to ask to see their papers.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 17, 2013 | By Joel Rubin
A state appeals court has set aside a lower court's ruling that struck down the Los Angeles Police Department's vehicle impound rules. The decision late Wednesday by a panel of three justices from the California Court of Appeal cleared the way for Police Chief Charlie Beck to reinstate the controversial impound policy he put in place last year to be more lenient on immigrants who are in the country illegally. In a statement Thursday, Beck said the policy, called Special Order 7, would be put back into place "immediately.
OPINION
May 12, 2007
Re "No job for the LAPD," Opinion, May 6 Who does Charles L. Lindner think he is fooling? According to our Constitution, we are supposed to be protected from foreign invasion. I believe Special Order 40 violates our Constitution and our right to be protected from foreign invaders. As for Lindner's argument regarding taxing our judicial system if Special Order 40 were repealed, how much time and money would be saved if we stopped coddling illegal foreigners? Why should taxpayers continue to be burdened with the enormous cost of illegal immigration?
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 18, 2009 | Joel Rubin
An appeals court Wednesday upheld the Los Angeles Police Department's Special Order 40, a policy governing how officers interact with immigrants. The three-judge panel of the state Court of Appeal unanimously agreed with a lower court's decision to throw out a lawsuit, in which a Los Angeles man argued that the LAPD's policy violated federal and state laws. In place since 1979, Special Order 40 prohibits LAPD officers from initiating contact with someone solely to determine whether they are in the country legally.
OPINION
April 15, 2008 | Earl Ofari Hutchinson, Earl Ofari Hutchinson is an author and political analyst. His new book is "The Ethnic Presidency: How Race Decides the Race to the White House."
When Jamiel Shaw Sr. stood up last week to call for a change in Special Order 40, it touched an already raw nerve in the black community. Shaw's son, 17-year-old star football player Jamiel Shaw II, was gunned down within shouting distance of his house. The suspect, 19-year-old Pedro Espinoza, is an alleged gang member and an illegal immigrant. Special Order 40 has prevented law enforcement from probing the immigration status of some suspects and deporting criminals with dispatch.
OPINION
April 9, 2008
The emotional heat of the immigration debate finally grew so intense that it opened up several alternate dimensions, where fact evaporates and folklore guides what passes for policy discussion. In one parallel Los Angeles, police officers see violent gang members whom they know to be illegal immigrants but can do nothing to stop them because of a politically correct edict known as Special Order 40.
OPINION
August 14, 2013 | By The Times editorial board
Last April, the Los Angeles Police Department adopted a new approach to the problem of unlicensed drivers, many of whom are barred from ever obtaining a license because of their immigration status. Under the rule, known as Special Order 7, police officers are authorized to impound the cars of unlicensed drivers (as they always have been), but those drivers who have no prior violations and can provide proof of insurance may retrieve their cars as soon as they pay the impound fees, rather than waiting 30 days.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 28, 2013 | By Joel Rubin
Los Angeles Police Chief Charlie Beck on Friday evening quietly rescinded the department's car impound policy, a controversial set of rules Beck put in place last year to be more lenient on immigrants in the country illegally but that a judge found violated state law. The move marked the latest setback for Beck in the long-running battle over the impound rules. In an interview Saturday the chief reiterated his belief that the policy - called Special Order 7 - was legal and necessary, saying that the recent court ruling that struck down the impound rules "undermines the authority of the police department to regulate the conduct of its officers.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 28, 2013 | By Joel Rubin
A day after he rescinded the LAPD's controversial car impound policy to adhere to a court ruling, police Chief Charlie Beck refused to back down from his belief that the impound rules are legal and should be allowed to remain in place. On Friday, Beck quietly sent word to his officers that they should not follow the impound rules, called Special Order 7, in light of a recent decision by Los Angeles County Superior Court Judge Terry Green to strike down the policy because it violates state law. In an interview Saturday, Beck declined to say outright whether lawyers for the city would appeal Green's ruling, saying that was a decision for City Atty.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 28, 2013 | By Joel Rubin
Los Angeles Police Chief Charlie Beck on Friday evening quietly rescinded the department's car impound policy, a controversial set of rules Beck put in place last year to be more lenient on immigrants in the country illegally, but which had come under fire from his own officers and a judge who found the policy violated state law. The surprise move marked a stark reversal for Beck, who just days earlier had reiterated in an interview with the Los...
OPINION
August 14, 2013 | By The Times editorial board
Last April, the Los Angeles Police Department adopted a new approach to the problem of unlicensed drivers, many of whom are barred from ever obtaining a license because of their immigration status. Under the rule, known as Special Order 7, police officers are authorized to impound the cars of unlicensed drivers (as they always have been), but those drivers who have no prior violations and can provide proof of insurance may retrieve their cars as soon as they pay the impound fees, rather than waiting 30 days.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 13, 2013 | By Joel Rubin and Kate Linthicum
The fate of a Los Angeles police policy that gives officers some leeway in how they impound the vehicles of unlicensed drivers has been thrown into question. Los Angeles County Superior Court Judge Terry Green on Monday ruled that the policy, giving officers leeway in some scenarios when dealing with people caught driving without a license, violates state law. The policy was implemented by Police Chief Charlie Beck last year. Beck and the Police Commission presented the new rules as the morally correct move in a city with a large population of undocumented immigrants who cannot legally obtain licenses and thus were having their cars impounded at disproportionate rates.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 12, 2013 | By Joel Rubin and Kate Linthicum
The controversial rules that officers in the Los Angeles Police Department must follow when deciding whether to impound vehicles are illegal, a judge ruled Monday. Los Angeles County Superior Court Judge Terry Green, however, did not strike down the LAPD's impound policy immediately. In coming weeks, the judge will decide whether he should put his own ruling aside until an appeals court hears the case. Until then, the LAPD's policy will remain in effect, said Michael Kaufman, an attorney for the Southern California chapter of the American Civil Lberties Union, which was part of a coalition defending the impound rules.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 4, 2012 | By Joel Rubin and Andrew Blankstein, Los Angeles Times
Los Angeles Police Chief Charlie Beck stepped into the national immigration debate Thursday, announcing that hundreds of illegal immigrants arrested by his officers each year in low-level crimes would no longer be turned over to federal authorities for deportation. The new rules, which are expected to affect about 400 people arrested each year, mark a dramatic attempt by the nation's second-largest police department to distance itself from federal immigration policies that Beck says unfairly treat undocumented immigrants suspected of committing petty offenses.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 17, 2013 | By Joel Rubin
A state appeals court has set aside a lower court's ruling that struck down the Los Angeles Police Department's vehicle impound rules. The decision late Wednesday by a panel of three justices from the California Court of Appeal cleared the way for Police Chief Charlie Beck to reinstate the controversial impound policy he put in place last year to be more lenient on immigrants who are in the country illegally. In a statement Thursday, Beck said the policy, called Special Order 7, would be put back into place "immediately.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 20, 2009 | By Teresa Watanabe
On the plaza of Dolores Mission Church, long a sanctuary for illegal immigrants, a Roman Catholic priest asked the question that has hovered in the minds of so many of the city's migrants since Charlie Beck was appointed Los Angeles police chief. Flanked by parishioners holding flickering votive candles in the cool evening air, Father Scott Santarosa asked Beck whether he could assure community members that they will not be asked about their immigration status if they report a crime. " Sí," Beck said, drawing laughs and applause from the crowd.
NATIONAL
June 7, 2012 | By John M. Glionna
Steve Conlin knows this: A vodka by any other name would not sell as sweetly. Conlin's Ogden, Utah, distillery sells Five Wives Vodka, a product using a coy play on the state's history with polygamy . But not everyone is laughing and, in fact, the neighboring state of Idaho refused to allow the liquor to be sold in the state, citing objections over the vodka's name. But now Conlin is toasting a victory. On Wednesday, faced with threat of a lawsuit, Idaho said it will allow the sale of Five Wives Vodka.
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