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Special Order 40

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OPINION
April 14, 2005
Beware of local cops playing federal immigration officers. That's generally a lose-lose proposition, diminishing the ability of mistrusted police to fight crime in immigrant communities while subjecting Latinos, including American citizens, to a new type of ethnic profiling, a blanket "reasonable suspicion" for cops to stop foreign-looking individuals to ask to see their papers.
ARTICLES BY DATE
OPINION
December 23, 2009 | Tim Rutten
Over the last few weeks, Los Angeles Police Chief Charlie Beck twice has reaffirmed the department's commitment to Special Order 40, the 30-year-old policy that forbids officers from making routine inquiries about the immigration status of people they encounter or detain. The contexts and manner of Beck's affirmation suggest a couple of interesting -- and significant -- differences between the new chief's approach and that of his predecessor, William Bratton. Even after three decades, Special Order 40 remains the most controversial of LAPD's policing policies, as well as one of its most vital.
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OPINION
December 23, 2009 | Tim Rutten
Over the last few weeks, Los Angeles Police Chief Charlie Beck twice has reaffirmed the department's commitment to Special Order 40, the 30-year-old policy that forbids officers from making routine inquiries about the immigration status of people they encounter or detain. The contexts and manner of Beck's affirmation suggest a couple of interesting -- and significant -- differences between the new chief's approach and that of his predecessor, William Bratton. Even after three decades, Special Order 40 remains the most controversial of LAPD's policing policies, as well as one of its most vital.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 20, 2009 | By Teresa Watanabe
On the plaza of Dolores Mission Church, long a sanctuary for illegal immigrants, a Roman Catholic priest asked the question that has hovered in the minds of so many of the city's migrants since Charlie Beck was appointed Los Angeles police chief. Flanked by parishioners holding flickering votive candles in the cool evening air, Father Scott Santarosa asked Beck whether he could assure community members that they will not be asked about their immigration status if they report a crime. " Sí," Beck said, drawing laughs and applause from the crowd.
OPINION
May 12, 2007
Re "No job for the LAPD," Opinion, May 6 Who does Charles L. Lindner think he is fooling? According to our Constitution, we are supposed to be protected from foreign invasion. I believe Special Order 40 violates our Constitution and our right to be protected from foreign invaders. As for Lindner's argument regarding taxing our judicial system if Special Order 40 were repealed, how much time and money would be saved if we stopped coddling illegal foreigners? Why should taxpayers continue to be burdened with the enormous cost of illegal immigration?
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 18, 2009 | Joel Rubin
An appeals court Wednesday upheld the Los Angeles Police Department's Special Order 40, a policy governing how officers interact with immigrants. The three-judge panel of the state Court of Appeal unanimously agreed with a lower court's decision to throw out a lawsuit, in which a Los Angeles man argued that the LAPD's policy violated federal and state laws. In place since 1979, Special Order 40 prohibits LAPD officers from initiating contact with someone solely to determine whether they are in the country legally.
OPINION
April 15, 2008 | Earl Ofari Hutchinson, Earl Ofari Hutchinson is an author and political analyst. His new book is "The Ethnic Presidency: How Race Decides the Race to the White House."
When Jamiel Shaw Sr. stood up last week to call for a change in Special Order 40, it touched an already raw nerve in the black community. Shaw's son, 17-year-old star football player Jamiel Shaw II, was gunned down within shouting distance of his house. The suspect, 19-year-old Pedro Espinoza, is an alleged gang member and an illegal immigrant. Special Order 40 has prevented law enforcement from probing the immigration status of some suspects and deporting criminals with dispatch.
OPINION
April 9, 2008
The emotional heat of the immigration debate finally grew so intense that it opened up several alternate dimensions, where fact evaporates and folklore guides what passes for policy discussion. In one parallel Los Angeles, police officers see violent gang members whom they know to be illegal immigrants but can do nothing to stop them because of a politically correct edict known as Special Order 40.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 17, 2008 | Richard Winton, Times Staff Writer
Los Angeles Police Chief William J. Bratton said Wednesday that the department's controversial policy on dealing with illegal immigrants was widely misunderstood by the public and some of his own officers, and he would clarify the rule in the next couple of weeks. Bratton strongly defended the basic intent of the policy -- known as Special Order 40 -- which prohibits officers from initiating contact with individuals for the sole purpose of determining whether they are illegal immigrants.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 11, 2007 | Patrick McGreevy and Richard Winton, Times Staff Writers
The Los Angeles Police Department's landmark Special Order 40, which prohibits officers from inquiring about the immigration status of suspects, has come under an aggressive assault by anti-illegal immigrant activists who argue that it ties the hands of police. The nearly 30-year-old policy has long been controversial, but the current national debate about illegal immigration has prompted lawsuits that are aimed at overturning Special Order 40 and similar rules across the country.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 18, 2009 | Joel Rubin
An appeals court Wednesday upheld the Los Angeles Police Department's Special Order 40, a policy governing how officers interact with immigrants. The three-judge panel of the state Court of Appeal unanimously agreed with a lower court's decision to throw out a lawsuit, in which a Los Angeles man argued that the LAPD's policy violated federal and state laws. In place since 1979, Special Order 40 prohibits LAPD officers from initiating contact with someone solely to determine whether they are in the country legally.
OPINION
July 12, 2008
Is Los Angeles some kind of "sanctuary city" for illegal immigrants? People on all sides of the debate like to think so. Those who want to protect the immigrants and their families use the term with a certain bravado, as if to stress that their city has adopted a firm and unique moral stance. Those who want the immigrants out use it too, but as an expression of derision for what they insist is the flouting of federal immigration law.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 17, 2008 | Richard Winton, Times Staff Writer
Los Angeles Police Chief William J. Bratton said Wednesday that the department's controversial policy on dealing with illegal immigrants was widely misunderstood by the public and some of his own officers, and he would clarify the rule in the next couple of weeks. Bratton strongly defended the basic intent of the policy -- known as Special Order 40 -- which prohibits officers from initiating contact with individuals for the sole purpose of determining whether they are illegal immigrants.
OPINION
April 15, 2008 | Earl Ofari Hutchinson, Earl Ofari Hutchinson is an author and political analyst. His new book is "The Ethnic Presidency: How Race Decides the Race to the White House."
When Jamiel Shaw Sr. stood up last week to call for a change in Special Order 40, it touched an already raw nerve in the black community. Shaw's son, 17-year-old star football player Jamiel Shaw II, was gunned down within shouting distance of his house. The suspect, 19-year-old Pedro Espinoza, is an alleged gang member and an illegal immigrant. Special Order 40 has prevented law enforcement from probing the immigration status of some suspects and deporting criminals with dispatch.
OPINION
April 9, 2008
The emotional heat of the immigration debate finally grew so intense that it opened up several alternate dimensions, where fact evaporates and folklore guides what passes for policy discussion. In one parallel Los Angeles, police officers see violent gang members whom they know to be illegal immigrants but can do nothing to stop them because of a politically correct edict known as Special Order 40.
OPINION
May 12, 2007
Re "No job for the LAPD," Opinion, May 6 Who does Charles L. Lindner think he is fooling? According to our Constitution, we are supposed to be protected from foreign invasion. I believe Special Order 40 violates our Constitution and our right to be protected from foreign invaders. As for Lindner's argument regarding taxing our judicial system if Special Order 40 were repealed, how much time and money would be saved if we stopped coddling illegal foreigners? Why should taxpayers continue to be burdened with the enormous cost of illegal immigration?
OPINION
July 12, 2008
Is Los Angeles some kind of "sanctuary city" for illegal immigrants? People on all sides of the debate like to think so. Those who want to protect the immigrants and their families use the term with a certain bravado, as if to stress that their city has adopted a firm and unique moral stance. Those who want the immigrants out use it too, but as an expression of derision for what they insist is the flouting of federal immigration law.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 20, 2009 | By Teresa Watanabe
On the plaza of Dolores Mission Church, long a sanctuary for illegal immigrants, a Roman Catholic priest asked the question that has hovered in the minds of so many of the city's migrants since Charlie Beck was appointed Los Angeles police chief. Flanked by parishioners holding flickering votive candles in the cool evening air, Father Scott Santarosa asked Beck whether he could assure community members that they will not be asked about their immigration status if they report a crime. " Sí," Beck said, drawing laughs and applause from the crowd.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 11, 2007 | Patrick McGreevy and Richard Winton, Times Staff Writers
The Los Angeles Police Department's landmark Special Order 40, which prohibits officers from inquiring about the immigration status of suspects, has come under an aggressive assault by anti-illegal immigrant activists who argue that it ties the hands of police. The nearly 30-year-old policy has long been controversial, but the current national debate about illegal immigration has prompted lawsuits that are aimed at overturning Special Order 40 and similar rules across the country.
OPINION
April 14, 2005
Beware of local cops playing federal immigration officers. That's generally a lose-lose proposition, diminishing the ability of mistrusted police to fight crime in immigrant communities while subjecting Latinos, including American citizens, to a new type of ethnic profiling, a blanket "reasonable suspicion" for cops to stop foreign-looking individuals to ask to see their papers.
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