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Special Prosecutors

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NEWS
June 16, 1987 | United Press International
The Justice Department, blasting special prosecutors for spending too much, taking too long and abusing their authority, told Congress today that it is opposed to the independent counsel law and will recommend that the President veto any attempt to renew it. The official word on the law, in a letter to Sen. Carl Levin (D-Mich.) from Assistant Atty. Gen.
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NATIONAL
January 8, 2014 | By Matt Pearce
Will charges be filed in the Maryville rape case? A special prosecutor in Missouri was expected to meet with a judge on Thursday to discuss her investigation into an incident that drew national attention last fall. Jackson County prosecutor Jean Peters Baker has been tight-lipped about whether she plans to bring charges. She was  appointed to handle the case in October, after a newspaper story sparked a public uproar over whether a northwest Missouri prosecutor had dropped charges for political reasons.
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NEWS
June 25, 1999 | From Times Wire Reports
Atty. Gen. Janet Reno said the Justice Department will be ready to handle appointing special prosecutors to investigate misconduct by high government officials when the independent counsel law expires next week. Reno said the department is nearly finished crafting rules it will follow in naming special investigators.
NATIONAL
October 21, 2013 | By David Zucchino and Matt Pearce
On the heels of pressure from state politicians and a newspaper expose, a special prosecutor in Missouri has been appointed to investigate the alleged 2012 rape of a 14-year-old girl in the small town of Maryville. Jean Peters Baker, the prosecutor in Jackson County, in the Kansas City area, has been asked by a judge to reexamine the case, which was dropped by the county prosecutor in Maryville even though the girl had identified a 17-year-old high school football player as her attacker.
NEWS
April 13, 1989 | DAVID LAUTER and RONALD J. OSTROW, Times Staff Writers
The Bush Administration is proposing to use its new ethics reform legislation as a vehicle to reduce substantially the independence of the special prosecutors appointed to investigate government wrongdoing. The changes, some of which have been sought for years by executive branch officials, are designed to give the Justice Department more control over the prosecutors, known formally as independent counsels. Several members of the Ronald Reagan Administration were investigated by independent counsels.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 23, 1989 | FREDERICK M. MUIR, Times Staff Writer
The staff of Mayor Tom Bradley's commission on ethics recommended Friday that the city hire special prosecutors to "perform full-scale investigations" of public officials suspected of corruption. In a report to commissioners, the staff recommended that special prosecutors be granted legal powers far greater than those of the city attorney, including the authority to subpoena witnesses and question them under oath.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 30, 2000 | MONTE MORIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Anaheim voters could close a rancorous chapter in city political history when they consider a ballot measure barring city officials from hiring special prosecutors. And in Costa Mesa and Garden Grove, voters will consider raising taxes on out-of-towners, while Huntington Beach voters could yank a power company's tax exemption.
NEWS
October 1, 1993 | RONALD J. OSTROW, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Atty. Gen. Janet Reno, pledging that the influence-peddling investigation of Commerce Secretary Ronald H. Brown will be resolved based on "the evidence and the law," Thursday rejected Republican congressional demands that she appoint a special prosecutor to conduct the investigation. "If I appoint the person . . , you're still going to question the conflict as long as I am involved in that process," Reno said during a regular meeting with reporters.
NEWS
October 29, 1988 | CARL INGRAM, Times Staff Writer
Atty. Gen. John K. Van de Kamp, asserting that a "lot better job can be done" in investigating and prosecuting public officials who do wrong, said Friday that he is considering asking the Legislature to create a state special prosecutor's position.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 22, 1989
That's a real smooth, typical Republican ploy: Bush proposing to bring special prosecutors under the benevolent supervision of the Justice Department, whose shortcomings are the occasion for appointing them in the first place! It is understandable. But for the special counsel, the Iran-Contra affair could have been hushed up, exactly as Meese and his White House and congressional cronies would have wished. And Bush himself, but for the evidence now brought out at Oliver North's trial, might have escaped the cloud of complicity hovering over his head.
NATIONAL
October 16, 2013 | By Matt Pearce
Three days after a newspaper article created an uproar over dropped  charges against a man accused of rape in northwest Missouri, an embattled county prosecutor announced Wednesday that he has asked for a special prosecutor to reexamine the case. Nodaway County Prosecutor Robert Rice has come under fire after dropping charges last year against a young man accused of raping Daisy Coleman, then 14, in early 2012. On Tuesday, the state's lieutenant governor and House speaker called for the attorney general to intervene and for a grand jury to examine the case.
NATIONAL
April 10, 2012 | Staff and Wire Services
SANFORD, Fla. - The Trayvon Martin case took a bizarre turn Tuesday when George Zimmerman's attorneys quit, complaining that they had lost all contact with him and that he called the prosecutor and talked to a TV host after they told him not to speak to anyone. And late Tuesday, special prosecutor Angela Corey said she would announce “new information” about the controversial case within 72 hours. She did not elaborate. Attorneys Craig Sonner and Hal Uhrig portrayed the former neighborhood watch volunteer as erratic and his mental state as shaky, and they expressed fear for his health under the pressure that has been building since he shot and killed Martin, an unarmed black teenager, on Feb. 26. "As of the last couple days he has not returned phone calls, text messages or emails," Sonner said at a news conference outside Seminole County Courthouse in Sanford, Fla. "He's gone on his own. I'm not sure what he's doing or who he's talking to. I cannot go forward speaking to the public about George Zimmerman and this case as representing him because I've lost contact with him. " Uhrig added, "Whenever we call him, the call goes to voicemail.
NATIONAL
March 27, 2012 | By Rene Lynch and Michael Muskal, Los Angeles Times
The parents of slain teenager Trayvon Martin took their call for justice for their son to Capitol Hill on Tuesday as the special prosecutor appointed to the case asked that the political temperature be lowered so that she can properly investigate the Florida shooting. State special prosecutor Angela B. Corey, who was named last week by Florida Gov. Rick Scott to take over the case from local officials, said her team of investigators needed time to do its job. Corey said her investigation could possibly result in state charges that bypass the need for the Seminole County grand jury, which is scheduled to convene April 10 to hear the case.
NATIONAL
March 27, 2012 | By Rene Lynch
The special prosecutor investigating the fatal shooting of an unarmed teenager by a neighborhood watch volunteer pleaded with the public Tuesday to give her team the time it needs to uncover the truth. Angela B. Corey, a veteran prosecutor, said she is well aware of the public's demands for answers in the shooting death of 17-year-old Trayvon Martin in what has become a racially charged case triggering nationwide outrage. "We stepped into this case Thursday night," Corey told The Times.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 26, 2012 | From a Times Staff Writer
Henry S. Ruth Jr., who served a year as Watergate special prosecutor after Archibald Cox was fired and Leon Jaworski resigned, died in Tucson on March 16 after a stroke, his wife, Deborah Mathieu, said. He was 80. Ruth investigated organized crime for the Justice Department before joining the Watergate investigation in 1973 as Cox's chief deputy. When Cox was fired later that year during the infamous Saturday Night Massacre, Ruth rallied the staff and preserved the evidence they had collected in the corruption probe that ultimately led to President Nixon's resignation in 1974.
NATIONAL
August 24, 2011 | By Geraldine Baum, Los Angeles Times
Dominique Strauss-Kahn looked considerably better leaving a Manhattan courthouse Tuesday than he did three months ago when he first arrived in police custody, tired and disheveled, to face charges that he tried to rape a hotel housekeeper. This time the French political leader was smiling, even looking like he had lost a few pounds, in a dark-blue suit and striped tie. His wife and legal team were also all smiling: Strauss-Kahn was a free man and, as he later told French reporters, "in a hurry to get home.
OPINION
May 30, 2003 | James D. Zirin, James D. Zirin is an attorney in New York.
Americans love special prosecutors. Special prosecutors are independent and fearless, with no ties to those being investigated. Special prosecutors remove the suspicion that arises when an investigation is done from within. With a special prosecutor, there can be no shifting of the blame by the people on top, no scapegoating of lesser fry. No one loves special prosecutors more than the New York Times.
OPINION
May 11, 2003
I am not shocked by revelations of conflict of interest in our nation's defense establishment ("Consulting and Policy Overlap," May 7). Pentagon advisor Richard Perle and his fellow Republicans have never seemed ashamed enough of their belief in politics as the pursuit of profit by other means to bother to try to hide it. I can't contain my disgust, though, on reading about Perle's aggressive efforts to make money off the slaughter of other human beings...
NATIONAL
November 9, 2010 | By Ken Dilanian, Tribune Washington Bureau
The CIA officers who destroyed videotapes of harsh interrogations will not be charged with crimes, the Justice Department said Tuesday, but a special prosecutor continues to investigate whether treatment of Al Qaeda detainees crossed the legal line. Jose A. Rodriguez, a 30-year CIA veteran who headed the agency's clandestine service, ordered his staff in November 2005 to destroy tapes of the interrogations of accused terrorists Abu Zubaydah and Abd al Rahim al Nashiri, against the advice of agency lawyers, according to a former CIA official involved in the matter.
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