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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 9, 1996 | DAVID E. BRADY
Officially, Arbor Day fell on April 26 this year, but for the students and staff of Lokrantz Special Education Center in Reseda, the occasion arrived on Wednesday morning in the form of 22 crape myrtle trees. Aided by 35 members of the Los Angeles Conservation Corps, faculty and students at the school for disabled children spent the morning planting the trees outside the campus along Shirley Avenue.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 13, 2011 | By Carla Rivera, Los Angeles Times
When veteran educator Arturo Delgado takes over as the superintendent of the Los Angeles County Office of Education next month, he will face a formidable challenge: charting a new course for an unheralded but powerful agency that has been hammered by budget cuts and faulted for failing to adequately educate the troubled and incarcerated youth it serves. Delgado was chosen for the post by the county Board of Supervisors last week after a closed-door meeting. He was one of five finalists for the position that was vacated last August when Darline P. Robles retired amid controversies over the safety and academic progress of students in detention facilities.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 18, 1990
Centinela Valley Union High School District trustees have rescheduled a series of private get-togethers that were canceled last week after a group of protesters took seats in the room where the discussions were to take place. The 30-minute, private sessions--designed to give parents, teachers, students and community members a chance to talk to individual trustees about racial tensions in the district--have been set for May 21 in the board room where last week's demonstration occurred.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 4, 2004 | Joel Rubin, Times Staff Writer
A beleaguered charter school company, the state's largest, is closing seven of its Southern California high schools, forcing more than 1,200 students to seek other options. Among those closing is the 800-student Abrazar campus in Westminster, which serves mostly older students who are no longer supported by state funding. California Charter Academy has run the seven schools -- it operates more than 60 statewide -- under a charter agreement with the Orange Unified School District.
NEWS
January 18, 1993 | Reuters
Three mentally handicapped teen-agers died and five others were seriously injured in a fire at a boarding school in southwest France overnight, police said Sunday. A director of the school in the village of Lapanouse-de-Severac told French television that the students' slow reaction to danger had hampered a quick evacuation.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 29, 1986 | NANCY GRAHAM, Times Staff Writer
Parents of learning-disabled children at UCLA's 65-year-old Fernald School won a limited victory Thursday when a Santa Monica Superior Court judge ordered the school to remain open until a lawsuit filed by the parents against UCLA Chancellor Charles E. Young and the UC Board of Regents is settled. Fernald, a school and research center on learning disabilities at UCLA, closed in June.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 2, 1990
Until this year, the San Diego Unified School District had just one option in dealing with students who brought weapons to school: automatic expulsion. It was a good choice. No one deserves to be booted from a public school faster than the youth who threatens his peers with guns or knives. But beginning this fall, the school district will have another alternative.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 5, 1995 | J.R. MOEHRINGER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
She grinned about the pain in her knee because it paled in comparison to the glee in her heart after giving her grandson a first step toward a better life. Juanita Muro simply wanted something more for 11-year-old Gabriel, whose mother has been in prison since he was a baby. She wanted his school to be a sanctuary from the world's drug-poisoned playgrounds and gang-patrolled halls. If standing in line and leaning on her bad knee was the only way, she would wait. She had plenty of company.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 26, 1986 | From Associated Press
Some students with learning disabilities are attending a special school on borrowed time while their parents fight to keep the school open after this year. The Fernald School at UCLA is scheduled to close at the end of the academic year after 65 years of promoting unusually rapid progress for students and providing teaching experience for UCLA students. University officials decided that too little academic research is being conducted there and tried to shut the school in February.
NEWS
May 26, 1994 | DEBORAH SULLIVAN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
After several years of scraping by on a dwindling budget, an Altadena school that serves the most severely emotionally disturbed students from surrounding school districts will close its doors June 23. Since 1959, the Escalon Center has been teaching students who were branded unmanageable in regular classes and special education programs.
OPINION
December 1, 2003
Voters will soon be approached by petition gatherers promising better schools or "free" preschools or better teachers, or all of the above. As in the cases of most petition slogans, the problems are in what they don't tell you. The California Teachers Assn. and its partner, director/activist Rob Reiner, have written a flawed ballot initiative called the Improving Classroom Education Act that -- despite nobly stated goals -- would raise business property taxes by $4.
OPINION
June 18, 2002
I was profoundly saddened to read that Bellagio Road Newcomer Center would be closing this month ("Special School for Immigrants to Close," June 13). I was on the original committee to develop the Newcomer Center. Over the years I had the opportunity to work with especially caring teachers, counselors and nurses dedicated to giving newly arrived immigrants the right academic start in their adopted country. Children arrived in September quiet and a little awed by the beautiful American school in the canyon.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 13, 2002 | SOLOMON MOORE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Bellagio Road Newcomer Center, a leafy Bel-Air refuge for children who recently immigrated to Los Angeles, will close at the end of this month, a casualty of budget cuts and changing ideas about educating youngsters from other countries. Emphasizing intensive language instruction and social acculturation, Bellagio is among only a few such schools across the nation, including facilities in Sacramento, San Francisco and New York City.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 7, 2002 | JOE MATHEWS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Los Angeles County is in talks to possibly transfer a prominent but money-losing high school it operates to the Pomona Unified School District. Launched nine years ago on the campus of Cal Poly Pomona, International Polytechnic High School is one of the county's two specialized high schools. The 440-pupil school attracts students from throughout Southern California, requires them to complete elaborate projects and allows juniors and seniors to take courses at Cal Poly.
NEWS
January 31, 2002 | ERIKA HAYASAKI and SOLOMON MOORE, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
The Los Angeles Unified School District is starting a dramatic overhaul of its special education programs, aiming to place into regular classes 35,000 disabled students who now are segregated. The reforms will end separate schools for disabled children over the next four years. Virtually all 660 campuses in the district will be affected as many physically and psychologically handicapped youngsters currently in separate classes join mainstream students, officials say.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 5, 1999 | TONY LYSTRA, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Lt. Cmdr. Bill Chubb likes what he hears when a new test pilot hits the throttle of an F-14 fighter jet. "When you light up the afterburner and you feel how much it accelerates, you hear, 'Oh my, this is nice,' " he said. Chubb has been sitting in the back-seat of the fighter planes as a small team of European test pilots and one engineer from a British test-pilot school learn how the planes handle.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 11, 1989
There are special schools for children whose IQs are 40 points lower than average. We give these children small classes, special buses, special programs galore, and what do we do for the children whose IQs deviate in the other direction? Some kids who are blessed with IQs that much higher than average feel they are punished for it. They are made to "learn" and "relearn" something they knew before they sat down in class. When they get really bored, they start trouble just to see if they can get out of the dull school, and then their motivation for learning is down the tubes completely.
NEWS
July 7, 1993 | From Associated Press
The creation of a special school district for Hasidic Jews was an unconstitutional endorsement of religion by government, New York state's highest court ruled Tuesday. The Court of Appeals, by a 4-2 margin, rejected the Legislature's 1989 solution to the thorny political problem of how to provide school services to the village of Kiryas Joel in Orange County. Almost all of the village residents are members of the Satmar Hasidic sect.
OPINION
October 17, 1999
Most Americans would probably pay more to improve local schools, but few would willingly write a larger check for the same old disappointments. Colorado voters, thinking along these lines, might strike an unusual bargain with school officials that links tax dollars to test scores. Voters in two school districts will be asked Nov.
SPORTS
January 26, 1999 | DIANE PUCIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Joshua Frase has never tasted an apple or screwed up his face in disgust when a Brussels sprout crossed his lips. He hasn't discovered the sweet joy of a cookie or pucker power of fresh-squeezed lemonade. For his entire life, which will reach four years, God willing, next month, Joshua has received his nourishment through a feeding tube. Joshua won't ever walk or throw a football. He won't be able to sit in the stands and watch his dad, Baltimore Raven defensive end Paul Frase, play football.
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