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Special Treatment

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ENTERTAINMENT
September 16, 2011 | By Kevin Thomas
Writer-director Jeanne Labrune affords Isabelle Huppert, arguably the finest French screen actress of her generation, yet another splendid role in the complex, compassionate and endlessly illuminating "Special Treatment. " Huppert plays Alice, an art history major who years ago became a high-priced Paris prostitute specializing in kinky clients who require elaborate role-playing on her part. She is a coolly proud, fearless woman, confident of her looks and abilities even as she approaches 50, though she finds it increasingly difficult to deny that her soul is withering away.
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NEWS
April 3, 2014 | By Paul Thornton
Former NFL quarterback Boomer Esiason's evident dismay over New York Mets infielder Daniel Murphy's audacious decision to take a few days off early in the season to spend time with his wife and newborn child is yet more proof that pro sports today is as much about eye-rolling "color" commentary as it is the brief spurts of athleticism on the field. Baseball games are only a few hours long, leaving hours upon hours of airtime available for paid talkers to produce cringe-worthy commentary.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 28, 2013 | By Jill Cowan
As her client left jail under cover of darkness early Monday, the attorney for Conrad Murray -- the doctor convicted in the death of Michael Jackson -- said he did not receive special treatment. Murray served roughly two years of the  maximum four-year sentence he received for his involuntary-manslaughter conviction in 2011 f or his role in Jackson's death, which was caused by an overdose of the anesthetic propofol that the doctor had administered. Murray was able to evade reporters and Michael Jackson fans who were staked outside the jail by leaving through a nonpublic route that authorities declined to elaborate on. PHOTOS: AEG-Michael Jackson wrongful-death trial   Los Angeles County Sheriff's Department spokesman Steve Whitmore, who briefly addressed reporters, would only say that Murray was released to "representatives," and that such measures are allowed on a "case-by-case" basis to ensure certain inmates' safety and security.
BUSINESS
November 25, 2013 | By Hugo Martín
If you are among America's well-to-do, you may have noticed that the airline industry has been rolling out the red carpet for you lately. For good reason. The number of affluent travelers has risen in the last few years, according to a report by the travel marketing agency MMGY Global and research firm Harrison Group. Defined as those with an annual household income of $250,000 or more, affluent travelers make up 6% of the leisure travel market, up from 4% in 2010, according to the report.
NEWS
March 31, 1988
In regard to the appointment of Stephen Tan to the Monterey Park Planning Commission, there are several facts that were not included in your March 17 article. First, Tan was appointed during a special council meeting on March 8 at 4 p.m. It was not held in the council chamber, but upstairs in a conference room. Why the unusual place? What was the hurry? Why couldn't the appointment have been made in front of the community the following Monday at the regular council meeting? Second, Tan's application for the Planning Commission was received at City Hall the same day that he was appointed!
NEWS
June 28, 1987
Your article concerning parking zones (Times, May 31) has raised my indignation quotient by a power of three. It again illustrates the special treatment for affluent groups which seems to be overtaking Los Angeles like a plague. The article mentions the plight of wealthy beach residents who find it difficult to park on summer weekends. It is hard to feel sympathy for people who moved into their houses and apartments knowing of the parking problems in the area and who seek to cure them by forbidding free parking to non-residents.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 20, 1986 | KEVIN THOMAS, Times Staff Writer
A comedy about a bunch of alcoholics sounds like a contradiction in terms, to say the least. But leave it to the wry Yugoslavian sensibility to pull it off. Goran Paskaljevic's "Special Treatment" (at the Fox International) is indeed special. It's a bleakly funny film that combines subtlety and warmth with a rich sense of absurdity in the finest tradition of rueful Eastern European humor.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 26, 2010 | By Robert Faturechi, Los Angeles Times
The public watchdog overseeing the Los Angeles County Sheriff's Department said Monday it would not investigate allegations that Sheriff Lee Baca improperly used department resources to benefit one of his political donors, stating that the department does not have a policy against special treatment for campaign contributors. "In the real world there are realities that exist?the squeaky wheel gets the grease. In many ways we live in an unequal society," said Michael Gennaco, the head of the Office of Independent Review.
SPORTS
November 22, 2011 | Wire reports
A former Penn State official charged with enforcing discipline at the school said Tuesday that Joe Paterno's players got in trouble more often than other students, and got special treatment compared to non-athletes. Vicky Triponey , who resigned her post as the university's standards and conduct officer in 2007, confirmed that she sent a 2005 email to then-president Graham Spanier and others in which she expressed her concerns about how Penn State handled discipline cases involving football players.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 13, 2001
Special DVD versions of two vintage Academy Award-winning films will be released on Oct. 23 by Columbia/TriStar: "From Here to Eternity" (1953) and "On the Waterfront" (1954, starring Marlon Brando, left), with commentary by director Elia Kazan.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 28, 2013 | By Jill Cowan
As her client left jail under cover of darkness early Monday, the attorney for Conrad Murray -- the doctor convicted in the death of Michael Jackson -- said he did not receive special treatment. Murray served roughly two years of the  maximum four-year sentence he received for his involuntary-manslaughter conviction in 2011 f or his role in Jackson's death, which was caused by an overdose of the anesthetic propofol that the doctor had administered. Murray was able to evade reporters and Michael Jackson fans who were staked outside the jail by leaving through a nonpublic route that authorities declined to elaborate on. PHOTOS: AEG-Michael Jackson wrongful-death trial   Los Angeles County Sheriff's Department spokesman Steve Whitmore, who briefly addressed reporters, would only say that Murray was released to "representatives," and that such measures are allowed on a "case-by-case" basis to ensure certain inmates' safety and security.
OPINION
August 27, 2013 | Jonah Goldberg
Amid the celebration of the 50th anniversary of the March for Jobs and Freedom, there was a recurring complaint: What about economic justice? It is a source of enormous frustration among many on the left that Martin Luther King Jr.'s deservedly iconic status doesn't lend more support and credence to his economic ideas. The line "I have a dream that my four little children will one day live in a nation where they will be judged not by the color of their skin but by the content of their character" resides in the rhetorical pantheon with "Four score and seven years ago" and "We the people of the United States, in order to form a more perfect union.
NEWS
August 5, 2013 | By Jon Healey
The Wall Street Journal's editorial board opens its latest screed against the 2010 healthcare law Monday by paraphrasing H.L. Mencken as follows: "Nobody ever went broke underestimating the cynicism and self-dealing of the American political class. " I guess no one will go broke either underestimating the Journal opinionators' cynicism and misrepresentations in the face of a policy they oppose. The Journal's fusillade was prompted by the Obama administration's effort to keep congressional staff members from being hurt by a pernicious feature of the 2010 law. Added by Republican Sen. Charles Grassley of Iowa during the Senate Finance Committee's mark-up, the provision requires members of Congress and their staff to obtain health insurance through the new exchanges established by the law. To the Journal, this is the sort of eat-your-own-dog-food requirement that forces lawmakers to experience what they impose on their constituents.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 13, 2013 | By Patrick McGreevy, Los Angeles Times
SACRAMENTO - An influential state senator has a plan to allow electronic billboard ads that are currently banned by state law - including pitches for beer and gambling - next to a proposed NFL stadium in Los Angeles. The proposal, approved by a legislative committee, has outraged activists who oppose the proliferation of electronic billboards. They say lawmakers intend the measure as special treatment for Philip Anschutz, the Denver billionaire who wants to build the stadium in downtown Los Angeles.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 9, 2013 | By Robert Faturechi
When Justin Bravo applied to be a Los Angeles County sheriff's deputy, background investigators noted the young man had some brushes with the law that raised red flags about his past. Nonetheless, the department hired Bravo as a deputy through a little-known program called "Friends of the Sheriff" - a screening process for applicants with connections to department officials. Bravo's link was his uncle: Sheriff Lee Baca. Now, the jail deputy is the subject of a Sheriff's Department criminal probe into whether he abused an inmate.
OPINION
August 7, 2012
Re "Olympian tax hurdle," Aug. 4 The proposal in Congress to exempt Olympic medalists from paying taxes on their prize money is an example of our obsession with athletes and entertainers and the ineptness of Congress. Sure, the athletes worked hard, but what is their contribution to society? Why should they get special treatment? Teachers and doctors also work hard. Their accomplishments actually benefit society. Why should athletes but not teachers or doctors get a pass on paying taxes?
NATIONAL
March 3, 2012 | By Ian Duncan, Washington Bureau
Los Angeles should be treated more like a state when it comes to education, Mayor Antonio Villaraigosa said Friday in an attempt to persuade the U.S. Department of Education to give the city some special treatment. The mayor wants the city to receive federal money directly through Race to the Top, a competitive grant program, and get a waiver from No Child Left Behind, the President George W. Bush-era standardized-testing policy. Both options have been available only to states. Villaraigosa floated the plan at a panel discussion with New York Mayor Michael R. Bloomberg, Chicago Mayor Rahm Emanuel and Education Secretary Arne Duncan at American University.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 20, 1989 | CATHLEEN DECKER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Mayor Tom Bradley, angrily disputing a Times report that he offered preferential treatment to a personal friend and her business clients, declared Tuesday that the access given to Mary Anne Singer was no more sweeping than that accorded to hundreds of lobbyists and public relations executives. "I can tell you that there are hundreds of PR firms and representatives who have access and who are campaign contributors who are able to reach me," the mayor said at a City Hall press conference.
NEWS
August 2, 2012 | By Sandra Hernandez
Rep. Laura Richardson (D-Long Beach) is getting lots of press this week, just not the kind that a candidate running for reelection might hope to attract. On Wednesday, the House Committee on Ethics recommended Richardson be reprimanded for violating codes of ethics and standards of conduct and fined $10,000. The committee concluded that Richardson pressured her legislative staff to work on her campaign, often against their will. Richardson is running against Rep. Janice Hahn in the newly created 44 th Congressional District that stretches from San Pedro to Watts and across to South Gate.
NATIONAL
March 3, 2012 | By Ian Duncan, Washington Bureau
Los Angeles should be treated more like a state when it comes to education, Mayor Antonio Villaraigosa said Friday in an attempt to persuade the U.S. Department of Education to give the city some special treatment. The mayor wants the city to receive federal money directly through Race to the Top, a competitive grant program, and get a waiver from No Child Left Behind, the President George W. Bush-era standardized-testing policy. Both options have been available only to states. Villaraigosa floated the plan at a panel discussion with New York Mayor Michael R. Bloomberg, Chicago Mayor Rahm Emanuel and Education Secretary Arne Duncan at American University.
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