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SPORTS
October 16, 2013 | By Eric Sondheimer
 An intriguing story from SFGate.com about injuries rising as young athletes focus on one sport should create lots of debate. There has been discussion about whether specialization was good or bad for young athletes. Now there's growing interest about injuries surfacing from overuse. Eric.sondheimer@latimes.com  
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 30, 2014 | By Abby Sewell
A Los Angeles County Superior Court judge Friday ruled that a front-runner in the race for county assessor can't call himself a "deputy assessor" on the ballot. Candidate Omar Haroon, an appraiser in the assessor's office, had filed a court case contending that the occupation listed by rival candidate Jeffrey Prang, a West Hollywood councilman who also works as a public affairs manager for the county agency, was misleading. The assessor's office does not use "deputy assessor" as an official job title.
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BUSINESS
October 17, 1993
In reference to "One Casualty of Clinton's Health Plan: Freedom to Choose" (Sept. 22), I want to discuss reasons for specialization in medical practice and Park Nicollet cost saving and innovation. I agree with the main premise of the article, that medical care rationing is most likely in our future. Columnist James Flanigan is, however, perpetuating a myth that has gained wide acceptance through repetition by policy wonks and the media: that "the vast majority of medical students have gone into specialized practice because that's where the higher incomes have been."
SPORTS
March 24, 2014 | By Helene Elliott
Times columnist Helene Elliott rates the pluses and minuses in the NHL from the previous week: + The San Jose Sharks touched many hearts by going all-out to grant the wish of 17-year-old Sam Tageson, who has a debilitating heart condition. They signed him to a one-day contract and let him skate onto the ice with them last Tuesday, triggering a flood of emotions from him and all who saw or read about it. Many teams do similar good deeds. Bad guys make headlines but there are good people in the sports world.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 18, 1989
As a doctor, Marvin, you surely must know the dangers inherent in practicing outside one's area of specialization. WES CLARK El Toro
BUSINESS
December 19, 1985
The Soviet Union and nine Communist allies launched a 15-year program to upgrade their economies in areas ranging from microelectronics to atomic energy. Prime ministers of the 10-nation trade bloc Comecon signed the accord, prepared during the last 12 months by Soviet officials, after a two-day meeting in Moscow. The program calls for more cooperation, specialization by individual member-countries in certain branches of industry, increased labor productivity and higher-quality goods.
NEWS
May 11, 1987
In a lifetime of work as a professional librarian and avid bibliophile, I have seldom read a book review as concerned and caring as the one by Lee Dembart of "The Civilized Engineer" by Samuel C. Florman ("An Engineer Extols Virtues of a Humanistic Outlook," April 28). It strikes me as an important book for educators and intellectuals alike to read and ponder over, especially in this age of specialization and computerization. For even if the cultural gap between science and humanism cannot be bridged, as Dembart states, at least with profound pleas such as Florman's, there can be communication.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 18, 1988
Greenberg correctly points out that indeed some are given undeserved continuing medical education (CME) credits. In all fairness, it must be pointed out that given the cost for attending any medical meeting, it would be foolish for any professional not to try to get his money's worth of education. It is certainly utopian for anyone to believe that there exists a foolproof system to guarantee competence. With the increasing sophistication and specialization in medicine, it is nearly impossible to devise a reliable test to relicense each physician periodically.
OPINION
May 19, 1985
"Neither reading nor writing flourishes in our blessed United States," Cleanth Brooks, the eminent literary critic, said recently. "In important respects, we are an illiterate nation." Anyone even mildly interested in literature, language and words knows the truth of Prof. Brooks' lament. Part of the problem, at least, is the increased specialization demanded by a highly specialized world.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 2, 1988 | Staff Writer Jerry Hicks
Prosecutors in the Randy Steven Kraft murder trial say a paper with 61 entries, found in his car trunk when he was arrested May 14, 1983, is a death list--Kraft's own score card of how many young men he had killed dating back to late 1971. Kraft's attorneys deny it is a death list, and call it meaningless information that will only inflame his jury. Kraft himself, in a 1983 interview, called the list nothing more than references to friends of his and his roommate at the time.
BUSINESS
March 24, 2014 | By Richard Verrier
Tim Warner, chief executive of Cinemark Holdings Inc., admits he'd never heard of the popular science fiction series "Doctor Who. " So the Montana native was skeptical when executives at BBC Wordwide approached him about the idea of screening a simulcast of the 50th anniversary episode of the cult-classic British TV series in Cinemark theaters across Latin America and the U.S. In late November, hundreds of "Whovians" showed up at more than...
ENTERTAINMENT
March 18, 2014 | By Ed Stockly
Customized TV Listings are available here: www.latimes.com/tvtimes Click here to download TV listings for the week of March 16-22, 2014 in PDF format This week's TV Movies SERIES Revolution Neville's (Giancarlo Esposito) political machinations lead to danger for him and Jason (JD Pardo) in this new episode. 8 p.m. NBC American Idol The top 10 perform 10 songs from 2010 to present in this new episode. 8 p.m. Fox Melissa & Joey Mel (Melissa Joan Hart)
SPORTS
March 17, 2014 | By Eric Sondheimer
 Southern Section Commissioner Rob Wigod has scheduled a special meeting of the Southern Section Council for June 10 to approve playoff groupings.  April 30 was the original day the Southern Section Council was scheduled to meet to approve final playoff groupings for 2014-2016. That day was thrown out after the Southern Section lost in arbitration to St. Bonaventure, Oaks Christian, Damien and St. Lucy's over where the schools would be placed for their sports teams. Meanwhile, league representatives from the Mt. SAC Area, Northern Area and Parochial Area must put together new leagues.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 15, 2014 | By Deborah Vankin
The sound of a woman descending into madness is rich and piercing - and oddly beautiful. In a quiet rehearsal room at the Los Angeles Opera, music director James Conlon gathers about half a dozen people around a grand piano. Among them is Russian coloratura soprano Albina Shagimuratova and French musician Thomas Bloch, who's just arrived from Paris with a rare, treasured instrument, the glass harmonica. Bloch takes a seat at what looks like an antique pedal sewing machine with gold-rimmed glass discs rotating on its spindle.
TRAVEL
March 14, 2014 | By Carolyn Lyons
CERRETO, Italy - Think of an Italian summer and you think of azure seas, sun-splashed beaches, cool mountains cupping dark lakes and overheated crowds of tourists investigating every museum and ancient church. Things are different in Tuscany as well as in Umbria, where I live, for part of the year. Every local community, no matter how small, puts on its own summer festa, or festival. Some are based on religion: Each village has its own patron saint to celebrate with a day of services and parades followed by a night of feasting, dancing and, of course, fireworks.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 13, 2014 | By Sheri Linden
Whether she's trysting with her married lover or helping other people die, the title character of "Honey" is a fascinating and complex figure, and Jasmine Trinca inhabits the role with a detached intensity that's thoroughly compelling. The Italian film - the assured feature-directing debut by actress Valeria Golino, still best known to American audiences for "Rain Man" - achieves the rare feat of addressing euthanasia head-on without devolving into a dramatized treatise or a button-pushing issue movie.
SPORTS
January 29, 1989 | STEVE BERKOWITZ, The Washington Post
Dale Brown says Chris Jackson is "a very unique man." "Somewhere along his life," Brown said this week, "the good Lord reached down and touched him on the shoulder. He gave him special skills and He gave him a special attitude." He also gave Chris Jackson to Dale Brown and Louisiana State University. And ever since, it has been Jackson who has been doing most of the giving. With this 6-foot-1, 170-pound freshman point guard from Gulfport, Miss., averaging 28.1 points, 4.2 assists, 3.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 20, 1991 | AMY LOUISE KAZMIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Actor Robert Young, who for 10 years served as the ideal TV patriarch in "Father Knows Best" and went on to star in "Marcus Welby, M.D.," attempted suicide at his Westlake Village home last week, authorities said Saturday. Lt. Bob Barrier, of the Los Angeles County Sheriff's Department, said Young, 83, ran a hose from the exhaust pipe to his car's interior last Saturday about 7:45 a.m. Authorities were alerted after Young called a tow truck to try to start his car.
NATIONAL
March 11, 2014 | By David Lauter
Republicans scored a significant victory in a special congressional election Tuesday, holding on to a seat in a swing district in Florida that Democrats had high hopes of capturing after a campaign that focused heavily on President Obama's healthcare law. With all precincts reporting, Republican David Jolly held a 3,400-vote margin over Democrat Alex Sink in the district, which stretches along the Gulf Coast north of St. Petersburg. The returns remain unofficial until final mail-in and provisional ballots can be counted, but Sink conceded defeat in a statement to supporters shortly after the polls closed.
SPORTS
March 7, 2014 | By Broderick Turner
The Clippers' total dismantling of the woebegone Lakers on Thursday elicited all sorts of responses about the talent on this Clippers team. Just listen to what basketball Hall of Famer and TNT analyst Charles Barkley had to say about who are the best teams in the West. "The two best teams in the Western Conference are the Los Angeles Clippers and the Oklahoma City Thunder…in that order," Barkley said Thursday night during the telecast of the Clippers-Lakers game. Indeed, the Clippers are playing their best basketball of the season, producing a season-best six-game winning streak.
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