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Spectacular Bid

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SPORTS
October 15, 2001 | BILL CHRISTINE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Trainer Bud Delp was asked the other day if any horse in the last 20 years could have beaten Spectacular Bid. "Last 20 years?" said Delp, thinking for a few moments. You could almost hear him clicking off several names in his head. "I don't see any. Not when the Bid was at the top of his game." When wasn't he? Spectacular Bid, who raced for Delp from 1978 through 1980, won 26 of 30 starts. In three of those losses--two as a 2-year-old--he was ridden by the erratic Ronnie Franklin.
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December 31, 2006 | Bob Mieszerski, Times Staff Writer
Bud Delp, a Thoroughbred trainer whose best horse, Spectacular Bid, was the 1979 Kentucky Derby and Preakness Stakes winner, died Friday at his home in Ellicott City, Md. He was 74 and had been battling cancer. Elected to racing's hall of fame in 2002, Delp will be best remembered for his success with Spectacular Bid, considered one of the greatest horses in history. The horse, purchased for $37,000 as a yearling, won 26 of 30 starts and earned nearly $2.
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SPORTS
April 10, 1997
Eight great horses that won more than 50% of their starts (minimum 20 starts): Native Dancer: won 21 of 22 starts Man o' War: won 20 of 21 starts Spectacular Bid: won 26 of 30 starts Dr. Fager: won 18 of 22 starts Buckpasser: won 25 of 31 starts Count Fleet: won 16 of 21 starts Secretariat: won 16 of 21 starts Swaps: won 19 of 25 starts Source: Thoroughbred Racing Commission
SPORTS
June 11, 2003 | Bob Mieszerski, Times Staff Writer
Spectacular Bid, the winner of the 1979 Kentucky Derby and Preakness and perhaps the best horse ever to fall one race short of sweeping the Triple Crown, died Monday afternoon of an apparent heart attack. A son of Bold Bidder out of the Promised Land mare Spectacular, the 27-year-old gray, who had turned white as he aged, was the second Derby winner to die in less than a week. Sunny's Halo, who won the world's most famous race in 1983, was euthanized on June 3.
SPORTS
April 14, 1989 | BILL CHRISTINE, Times Staff Writer
Easy Goer is being called the best potential winner of the Triple Crown since Spectacular Bid 10 years ago, and Bud Delp can understand why. "I haven't seen that kind of piston-like action in a horse since Spectacular Bid," Delp said. "He has the same kind of stride, which was effortless." Delp should know. In 1979, he trained Spectacular Bid, who won the Kentucky Derby and the Preakness before a third-place finish in the Belmont Stakes cost him the Triple Crown. For Delp and Spectacular Bid's owners--Harry and Teresa Meyerhoff and Harry's son, Tom--every day was New Year's Eve during that Triple Crown campaign.
SPORTS
June 4, 1986 | BILL CHRISTINE, Times Staff Writer
The horse was bought for only $10,000, has won just two races in his life and has never been better than second in a stakes race. The trainer is a mere 28, has had a license for less than a year and has saddled only five winners. So why is Imperious Spirit running in Saturday's Belmont Stakes?
SPORTS
May 4, 1989 | Bill Christine
For a few lucky photographers, the Kentucky Derby that was run 10 years ago is memorable for lots more than Spectacular Bid's winning it with the ease that a 3-5 favorite should. These were the photographers who shoot the race from the grandstand side of Churchill Downs, then scurry across the track as soon as the last horse hits the finish line so they can also cover the winner's circle. In 1979, however, it took Great Redeemer, a 78-1 shot, a long, long time to reach the finish line in the 10-horse field.
SPORTS
September 27, 1987 | ANDREW BEYER, The Washington Post
After scoring his third straight stakes victory in the Marlboro Cup, Java Gold is being hailed widely as the best 3-year-old in America and the probable horse of the year. The Daily Racing Form described his winning streak as "outstanding... superb... devastating" and suggested that Java Gold is the best 3-year-old since Spectacular Bid. That assessment is preposterous -- or, at the very least, premature.
SPORTS
June 16, 1989 | JACK MANN, The Baltimore Evening Sun
"I got to where I didn't know if I wanted to go on," Woody Stephens said. He was not talking about whether he wanted to go on training horses, which he has been doing for 50 years, or living, which he has been doing for about 76 years. That's "about" 76 years because Woodford Cefis Stephens has been known to approximate as well as exaggerate when talking about himself. "For a good many years," says Keene Daingerfield, the wondrous wise racing judge of Lexington, Ky., "Woody and I were the same age. And now I find he's two years younger."
SPORTS
February 4, 1985 | BILL CHRISTINE, Times Staff Writer
When Precisionist and Greinton hit the wire at almost the same time in one of the most dramatic runnings of the Charles H. Strub Stakes Sunday, Fred Hooper didn't budge from his seat in the directors' room at Santa Anita. Hooper, the 87-year-old owner of Precisionist, had as much right as the two horses to be wrung out after the slam-bang finish of the $324,300 race, but that wasn't his reason for sitting tight.
SPORTS
October 15, 2001 | BILL CHRISTINE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Trainer Bud Delp was asked the other day if any horse in the last 20 years could have beaten Spectacular Bid. "Last 20 years?" said Delp, thinking for a few moments. You could almost hear him clicking off several names in his head. "I don't see any. Not when the Bid was at the top of his game." When wasn't he? Spectacular Bid, who raced for Delp from 1978 through 1980, won 26 of 30 starts. In three of those losses--two as a 2-year-old--he was ridden by the erratic Ronnie Franklin.
SPORTS
March 2, 2000 | BOB MIESZERSKI, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Not long before the 1980 Malibu Stakes at Santa Anita, somebody wasn't shy about expressing his thoughts on certain visitors from the East. "We were in the saddling paddock and one loudmouth was yelling, 'Go back to Maryland where you belong . . . and Flying Paster is going to show you what he can do,' " remembered Harry Meyerhoff, one of the owners of a 4-year-old colt who was making his California debut.
SPORTS
June 3, 1999 | BILL CHRISTINE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Trainer Bud Delp said he has never watched a tape of the 1979 Belmont Stakes. For Delp, watching the race the first time was enough. The 1979 Belmont was supposed to be a Triple Crown coronation for Delp's Spectacular Bid, who had obliterated the opposition in the Kentucky Derby and Preakness. Instead, the Belmont produced one of racing's biggest upsets, and now, 20 years later, Delp still sputters when he talks about it.
SPORTS
March 11, 1999 | EARL GUSTKEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Spectacular Bid, in addition to being a spectacular winner, became a spectacular money machine 19 years ago today. The 1979 Kentucky Derby winner was syndicated for $22 million, on 40 shares at $550,000 each. At the time, the horse was racing's No. 2 money winner, at $2,089,417. Affirmed, the 1978 Triple Crown winner, had won $2,393,818. In 1979, Affirmed set a syndication record at $14.4 million. Later, Troy, a European horse, raised the bar to $16.5 million.
SPORTS
April 10, 1997
Eight great horses that won more than 50% of their starts (minimum 20 starts): Native Dancer: won 21 of 22 starts Man o' War: won 20 of 21 starts Spectacular Bid: won 26 of 30 starts Dr. Fager: won 18 of 22 starts Buckpasser: won 25 of 31 starts Count Fleet: won 16 of 21 starts Secretariat: won 16 of 21 starts Swaps: won 19 of 25 starts Source: Thoroughbred Racing Commission
NEWS
November 1, 1989 | SUZANNE MUCHNIC, TIMES ART WRITER
Most of the art, furniture and decorative objects that the late Robert Mapplethorpe amassed over 20 years has been snapped up by collectors and dealers in a single day. They paid a low of $55 for a turn-of-the-century drawing by Charles A. Vanderhoof and a high of $231,000 for Keith Haring's contemporary vase decorated with erotic images. The daylong auction of Mapplethorpe's estate was conducted Tuesday at Christie's. Sales of 577 lots totaled $2.
SPORTS
September 6, 1985
J.E. Jumonville Jr. questioned the time that his 2-year-old colt, Louisiana Slew, needed to win the first race of his career Sunday at Del Mar. Louisiana Slew ran six furlongs in 1:11 1/5. The track record is 1:07 3/5. When a man pays $2.9 million for a horse--as Jumonville did last year for Louisiana Slew at a Keeneland auction--maybe he has a right to expect not just wins, but also world records. "Forget about the time," trainer Wayne Lukas told Jumonville.
SPORTS
July 23, 1987 | Bill Christine
If Dick Mandella wins the first outright championship of his training career, some of the credit must go to Poley, the 8-year-old gelding who still knows how to win even though he's not good enough to run in stakes races anymore. Mandella, 35, goes into the last five days of the Hollywood Park season with 23 victories, which, barring a hot finish by Mel Stute, Laz Barrera or Gary Jones, should be enough to take the title.
SPORTS
June 16, 1989 | JACK MANN, The Baltimore Evening Sun
"I got to where I didn't know if I wanted to go on," Woody Stephens said. He was not talking about whether he wanted to go on training horses, which he has been doing for 50 years, or living, which he has been doing for about 76 years. That's "about" 76 years because Woodford Cefis Stephens has been known to approximate as well as exaggerate when talking about himself. "For a good many years," says Keene Daingerfield, the wondrous wise racing judge of Lexington, Ky., "Woody and I were the same age. And now I find he's two years younger."
SPORTS
May 4, 1989 | Bill Christine
For a few lucky photographers, the Kentucky Derby that was run 10 years ago is memorable for lots more than Spectacular Bid's winning it with the ease that a 3-5 favorite should. These were the photographers who shoot the race from the grandstand side of Churchill Downs, then scurry across the track as soon as the last horse hits the finish line so they can also cover the winner's circle. In 1979, however, it took Great Redeemer, a 78-1 shot, a long, long time to reach the finish line in the 10-horse field.
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