Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsSpeech Disorders
IN THE NEWS

Speech Disorders

FEATURED ARTICLES
BUSINESS
February 25, 2011 | By Stephen Ceasar, Los Angeles Times
Credit the "The King's Speech" for 12 Oscar nominations, $236 million in worldwide box office ? and a lot more business for speech therapists. Across the nation, clinics specializing in speech disorders and stutterers themselves say the film about British King George VI's battle to overcome a lifelong stammer has inspired many others, often shy and reluctant to seek assistance, to reach out for professional help. At the Stuttering Foundation of America, a nonprofit organization that provides information on stuttering and referrals to therapists nationwide, donations have shot up 20% since the movie opened, officials said.
ARTICLES BY DATE
BUSINESS
February 25, 2011 | By Stephen Ceasar, Los Angeles Times
Credit the "The King's Speech" for 12 Oscar nominations, $236 million in worldwide box office ? and a lot more business for speech therapists. Across the nation, clinics specializing in speech disorders and stutterers themselves say the film about British King George VI's battle to overcome a lifelong stammer has inspired many others, often shy and reluctant to seek assistance, to reach out for professional help. At the Stuttering Foundation of America, a nonprofit organization that provides information on stuttering and referrals to therapists nationwide, donations have shot up 20% since the movie opened, officials said.
Advertisement
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 5, 1992
A Cal State Fullerton professor has been awarded more than $200,000 to compare the effectiveness of two methods of treating stuttering in children. The one-year grant of $224,273 was given by the National Institute on Deafness and Other Communication Disorders to Glendon D. Riley, a professor emeritus of speech disorders at the Fullerton campus. The institute also has agreed to support the three-year study with additional funding through August, 1995, university officials said.
HEALTH
December 25, 2006 | Regina Nuzzo, Special to The Times
Martin Romoff used to rely on his voice to make a living as a Los Angeles tire salesman. But two decades of Parkinson's disease muffled his speech and spoiled the art of easy conversation. Even his wife, Shirley, asked him to repeat himself over and over. Then he learned about a special kind of voice training.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 25, 1993 | DEBRA CANO
Four-year-old Ciara Neice sat on a chair next to her teacher, Gina Nimmo, holding her doll, Ashley. "Say, 'My ba-by," Nimmo told the girl. "My ba-by," Ciara answered. "Perfect!" her teacher said. Nimmo is a speech-language pathologist who works with children in the Fountain Valley School District who have communication and speech disorders. A 15-year speech and language teacher, Nimmo coordinates the district's program for special needs of infants and preschool children up to the age of 5.
NEWS
November 22, 1990 | MARTHA BRIDEGAM, UNITED PRESS INTERNATIONAL
American intolerance for accents that fall strangely on their ears has generated a recent surge in students hoping to sound like a U.S. network newscaster. "I think there have been more requests for accent reduction work in the last decade, last five or six years," said Roy A. Koenigsknecht, president of the American Speech-Language-Hearing Assn.
NEWS
July 29, 1992 | SHERRY ANGEL, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Monica Fankhauser could fill volumes with the observations and opinions she has kept to herself all her life out of fear that she'd be ridiculed or rejected if she said what was on her mind. It's not what she has to say but the way she speaks that makes her feel she's putting herself on the line every time she engages in conversation. Fankhauser is one of an estimated 2.5 million Americans who stutter.
NEWS
May 15, 1992 | ROBIN ABCARIAN
A recent news story about the UC San Diego psychologist who has studied ums , ers and uhs --those annoying monosyllables that erupt like hiccups from the mouths of even the most articulate speakers--rekindled a long-forgotten childhood memory. Now, why a psychologist--as opposed to, say, a linguist--would embark on such an inquiry is beyond me, but as Nicholas Christenfeld, the psychologist in question, explained: "We are allowed to study whatever we want."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 17, 1990
The murder conviction of a man for throwing acid into the face of a Sylmar woman was upheld Monday by a federal appeals court, which said he was properly prevented from acting as his own lawyer because of a severe stutter. "Communicating with . . . a jury is the essence of a trial," said the 9th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals in a 3-0 ruling. Although self-representation in a criminal case is a constitutional right, it can be denied to those who cannot follow court procedures, the court said.
NEWS
September 17, 1990 | RICHARD A. SERRANO, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Whether truly ill or one of the world's great impostors, Kerry Lane Wheeler has managed to befuddle his mother, his fiancee, his family and the California prison system, and he has done it without ever saying a word. Since he was reportedly injured in a prison fight two years ago, the convicted thief has not uttered a sound.
SPORTS
November 18, 2004 | Dan Arritt, Times Staff Writer
The local TV camera crew was searching for a sound bite after a Fullerton Troy girls' tennis match three years ago. They wanted to hear about the pressures of playing for a top-notch high school tennis program. Coach Donna Judd suggested they interview a freshman player, rather than her, and pointed to Clare Fermin. By the time Judd remembered Fermin had a stuttering problem, which becomes more pronounced when she becomes excited or nervous, it was too late.
SCIENCE
August 5, 2002 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Stuttering, which affects about 1% of people after childhood, is caused by an abnormal structure of the left side of the brain, German researchers reported in Saturday's edition of the British journal The Lancet. The study used magnetic resonance imaging to look at 15 stutterers and 15 people with normal speech and found the impediment results from a disconnection of speech-related areas in the cortex, a team from the University of Hamburg said.
NEWS
January 28, 2001 | From Associated Press
Julie Andrews said it in "The Sound of Music": When you know the notes to sing, you can sing most anything. Now some Pittsburgh musicians are trying to prove it is true, even for youths with a speech disorder that keeps them from singing when the songs are too fast or the words too complex. Two parents of children with the disorder apraxia rounded up musicians, including the musical director at public television's "Mister Rogers' Neighborhood," to produce a compact disc, "Time to Sing."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 21, 1998 | EDWARD M. YOON
To help adults who stutter, Providence Holy Cross Medical Center is seeking individuals to take part in a new series of weekly group therapy sessions, hospital officials announced. Karen Mandel, supervisor of the center's speech pathology department, said the new program will address the problem of adult stuttering. "It's an idea I had for about a year and I'm very excited about getting it started," said Mandel, who will serve as the group's facilitator.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 24, 1998 | VANESSA HUA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Juan Rodas has learned to watch his tongue. The 5-year-old stared into a tiny mirror framed in the belly of a pink, one-eyed cat one recent rainy morning and was careful to keep his tongue behind his teeth as he practiced the sound, "sss, sss, sss." Sol, cebra, zapato--sun, zebra, shoe--the chubby-cheeked boy recited, as speech and language therapist Robin Garrett held up flashcards in English and Spanish.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 24, 1998 | VANESSA HUA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Juan Rodas has learned to watch his tongue. The 5-year-old stared into a tiny mirror framed in the belly of a pink, one-eyed cat one recent rainy morning in North Hollywood and was careful to keep his tongue behind his teeth as he practiced the sound, "sss, sss, sss." Sol, cebra, zapato--sun, zebra, shoe--the chubby-cheeked boy recited, as speech and language therapist Robin Garrett held up flashcards in English and Spanish.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 3, 1991 | AARON CURTISS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A stutterers' rights group took aim Monday at perhaps the most famous stutterer of all--Porky Pig--by objecting to Warner Bros. reproducing the cartoon character's speech impediment in a holiday catalogue. Ira Zimmerman of the National Stuttering Project said the catalogue advertising Warner Bros. merchandise insults people who stutter. In the offending statement, Porky urges readers of the company's winter catalogue: "D-d-d-don't delay. D-d-do your holiday shopping today."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 24, 1998 | VANESSA HUA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Juan Rodas has learned to watch his tongue. The 5-year-old stared into a tiny mirror framed in the belly of a pink, one-eyed cat one recent rainy morning and was careful to keep his tongue behind his teeth as he practiced the sound, "sss, sss, sss." Sol, cebra, zapato--sun, zebra, shoe--the chubby-cheeked boy recited, as speech and language therapist Robin Garrett held up flashcards in English and Spanish.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 25, 1998 | LISA ADDISON
The Irvine Health Foundation has awarded $20,000 to Cal State Fullerton's Center for Children Who Stutter. "With the foundation's grant, we can continue to expand the center's reach and impact into the community of child stutterers," said Glyndon Riley, administrative director for the center. "This year we hope to continue building a strong base of leadership and support for the center's ongoing operations." The center provides services to children, regardless of their ability to pay.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 13, 1997 | SYLVIA L. OLIANDE
Some parents of youngsters with severe speech impairments said they are upset that the Los Angeles Unified School District has changed the way a speech therapy class for preschool-aged children has been run in the San Fernando Valley since 1993. But district officials said the Phonological Processing Program is being reorganized at four Valley campuses to bring it in line with four other district schools utilizing the pilot program.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|