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Speech Recognition Computers

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NEWS
June 17, 1992 | ROSE KIM, TIMES STAFF WRITER
For years, Pam and John Miller wondered whether their 16-year-old autistic son, Morgan, heard or understood anything they said. He never spoke, never responded to their requests and thumbed aimlessly through magazines. But now, with a keyboard and the encouraging touch of a human hand, Morgan has learned to communicate some of his thoughts. "He can now type what he wants for breakfast. He can type to me what he feels. He can tell me what he wants to do.
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BUSINESS
March 15, 2007 | From the Associated Press
Microsoft said Wednesday it would buy Tellme Networks Inc., which provides voice-enabled mobile search, directory assistance and computerized, speech-driven customer service hotlines. Microsoft said Tellme's technology could be applied to a wide swath of products, including its market-leading Office suite and mobile search, as well as applications for the home and car.
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BUSINESS
October 9, 1995 | Times Staff and Wire Reports
Device Transforms Spoken Mandarin Into Text: The computer, called the Apple Chinese Dictation Kit, can recognize up to 350,000 Mandarin phrases. It is Apple Computer Inc.'s first product "designed in Asia, for Asia, by Asians," according to Louis Woo, director of the Apple Design Center in Singapore. Once the system is trained to recognize a specific individual's voice, it will process text five times faster than possible with a keyboard, Woo said. Cupertino, Calif.
BUSINESS
December 21, 1998 | LAWRENCE J. MAGID
About eight years ago I was on a radio program when someone asked whether we would have accurate and fast speech-recognition systems for our computers any time this century. I said no, because I believed it was a long way off. I was wrong. Programmers at Dragon Systems and IBM have done an incredible job developing software that is able to understand the spoken word.
NEWS
July 2, 1991 | EDWIN CHEN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Electronics wizards are abuzz over new breakthroughs in some of technology's most difficult and potentially important areas: the ability of computers to operate more like their human users do--verbally, visually and in other such fundamental ways. Today, powerful and invaluable though they are, most computers still work in relatively rigid and abstract patterns.
BUSINESS
May 24, 1991 | CARLA LAZZARESCHI, TIMES STAFF WRITER
International Business Machines lent its considerable clout to the growing market for speech-recognizing personal computers on Thursday by introducing a low-cost system that recognizes up to 7,000 spoken words. IBM said its new voice-recognizing system will allow thousands of disabled people, many of whom are now unable to type on conventional keyboards, to use computers.
BUSINESS
March 15, 2007 | From the Associated Press
Microsoft said Wednesday it would buy Tellme Networks Inc., which provides voice-enabled mobile search, directory assistance and computerized, speech-driven customer service hotlines. Microsoft said Tellme's technology could be applied to a wide swath of products, including its market-leading Office suite and mobile search, as well as applications for the home and car.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 13, 1997 | DAVID COLKER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Software creator Walter Woltosz got a mysterious phone call from Cambridge University in 1985, shortly after he started selling a computer system he had designed to allow severely disabled people to write and even "speak" by manipulating a single button. News of the system had reached the caller, who wondered if it might be right for "a very bright fellow" at the English university who had amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, better known as Lou Gehrig's disease.
BUSINESS
December 21, 1998 | LAWRENCE J. MAGID
About eight years ago I was on a radio program when someone asked whether we would have accurate and fast speech-recognition systems for our computers any time this century. I said no, because I believed it was a long way off. I was wrong. Programmers at Dragon Systems and IBM have done an incredible job developing software that is able to understand the spoken word.
BUSINESS
July 25, 2003 | Joseph Menn, Times Staff Writer
Microsoft Corp. Chairman Bill Gates on Thursday forcefully disputed a growing view that the software giant he had founded 28 years ago was a mature company in a mature industry past the stage of rapid growth. Speaking to Wall Street analysts and big shareholders assembled on Microsoft's campus, he also criticized experts and competitors who said that improved software and hardware wouldn't boost companies that used it, or the economy as a whole, as much in the future.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 13, 1997 | DAVID COLKER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Software creator Walter Woltosz got a mysterious phone call from Cambridge University in 1985, shortly after he started selling a computer system he had designed to allow severely disabled people to write and even "speak" by manipulating a single button. News of the system had reached the caller, who wondered if it might be right for "a very bright fellow" at the English university who had amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, better known as Lou Gehrig's disease.
BUSINESS
October 9, 1995 | Times Staff and Wire Reports
Device Transforms Spoken Mandarin Into Text: The computer, called the Apple Chinese Dictation Kit, can recognize up to 350,000 Mandarin phrases. It is Apple Computer Inc.'s first product "designed in Asia, for Asia, by Asians," according to Louis Woo, director of the Apple Design Center in Singapore. Once the system is trained to recognize a specific individual's voice, it will process text five times faster than possible with a keyboard, Woo said. Cupertino, Calif.
NEWS
June 17, 1992 | ROSE KIM, TIMES STAFF WRITER
For years, Pam and John Miller wondered whether their 16-year-old autistic son, Morgan, heard or understood anything they said. He never spoke, never responded to their requests and thumbed aimlessly through magazines. But now, with a keyboard and the encouraging touch of a human hand, Morgan has learned to communicate some of his thoughts. "He can now type what he wants for breakfast. He can type to me what he feels. He can tell me what he wants to do.
NEWS
July 2, 1991 | EDWIN CHEN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Electronics wizards are abuzz over new breakthroughs in some of technology's most difficult and potentially important areas: the ability of computers to operate more like their human users do--verbally, visually and in other such fundamental ways. Today, powerful and invaluable though they are, most computers still work in relatively rigid and abstract patterns.
BUSINESS
May 24, 1991 | CARLA LAZZARESCHI, TIMES STAFF WRITER
International Business Machines lent its considerable clout to the growing market for speech-recognizing personal computers on Thursday by introducing a low-cost system that recognizes up to 7,000 spoken words. IBM said its new voice-recognizing system will allow thousands of disabled people, many of whom are now unable to type on conventional keyboards, to use computers.
BUSINESS
August 12, 2002 | KAREN KAPLAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
If Yahoo Inc. had a voice, it would sound like Jenni McDermott. The perky dog lover who dreams of becoming a professional painter reads news headlines, weather reports and e-mail messages to Yahoo customers who access the popular Internet service by phone each day. But Jenni's true role is much bigger than that. Her job is to personify the quirky dot-com with her voice--and every detail about it has been meticulously designed with Yahoo's brand image in mind.
NEWS
March 24, 1988 | DAVID OLMOS, Times Staff Writer
Pedaling his bicycle along a San Juan Capistrano street in September, 1986, Tom Bocsko didn't notice the car parked in the middle of the bike lane until it was too late. The accident left him paralyzed from the neck down. Suddenly, simple, everyday tasks, such as answering the telephone or writing a letter, became exceedingly difficult for the 34-year-old fisheries scientist. But a futuristic speech-recognition computer named "HAL" is making his life a little easier now.
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