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Speech Therapy

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 13, 1997 | SYLVIA L. OLIANDE
Some parents of youngsters with severe speech impairments said they are upset that the Los Angeles Unified School District has changed the way a speech therapy class for preschool-aged children has been run in the San Fernando Valley since 1993. But district officials said the Phonological Processing Program is being reorganized at four Valley campuses to bring it in line with four other district schools utilizing the pilot program.
ARTICLES BY DATE
BUSINESS
November 13, 2012 | By Chad Terhune
Medicare paid $1.5 billion in improper claims for skilled nursing care in 2009, federal investigators found. The inspector general of the Department of Health and Human Services said Tuesday that 25% of all Medicare claims submitted by skilled nursing facilities had errors and the majority of those bills were "upcoded" for ultra-high therapy that wasn't necessary. About 15,000 nursing homes and other facilities provide this physical therapy, rehabilitation and other care to patients, often after a hospital stay.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 14, 1995 | ANTONIO OLIVO
Four-year-old Matthew Guadagno of Northridge sat in an elementary school classroom Tuesday carefully drawing a flag on a sheet of paper. "What have you got there?" asked Nanci Mancinelly, his teacher. "It's a fwag," Matthew answered. "No, that's f-l-a-g," Mancinelly enunciated slowly, guiding Matthew's eyes to look directly at her so he could see how the word is formed. "Fw-l-a-g," Matthew repeated, his tongue barely able to roll out the "l" Mancinelly called for.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 25, 2011 | By Christopher Hawthorne, Los Angeles Times Architecture Critic
Rarely has a film been as celebrated or dissected for its treatment of architectural themes than Christopher Nolan's "Inception. " I wrote my own piece about the feverish, high-flying psychological thriller not long after it arrived in theaters last summer, and if I wasn't entirely positive ? the picture's backdrops are alternately inspired and dipped in cliché ? my doubts did little to change the fact that the movie puts architecture front and center like few Hollywood products in recent memory.
NEWS
August 2, 1990 | BARBARA BRONSON GRAY, Gray is a regular contributor to Valley View
Christina David was only 3 1/2 when her parents realized that only her family could understand her speech. The pediatrician told her parents that Christina's frequent ear infections--which limited her ability to hear--may have contributed to her language problem, and recommended speech therapy. Her parents, Dotty and Pablo David, spent about $3,500 for a year and a half of private speech therapy, yet still felt Christina was difficult to understand.
NEWS
July 29, 1992 | SHERRY ANGEL, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Monica Fankhauser could fill volumes with the observations and opinions she has kept to herself all her life out of fear that she'd be ridiculed or rejected if she said what was on her mind. It's not what she has to say but the way she speaks that makes her feel she's putting herself on the line every time she engages in conversation. Fankhauser is one of an estimated 2.5 million Americans who stutter.
HEALTH
March 1, 2010 | By Melissa Healy
Yes, yes, it hath charms to soothe a savage breast (or beast, if you prefer to repeat a common mistake). But researchers are finding that music may be an effective balm for many other afflictions: the isolation of conditions such as autism and Alzheimer's disease, the disability that results from stroke, the physical stress of entering the world too early. The hope of music's curative powers has spawned a community in the United States of some 5,000 registered music therapists, who have done post-college study in psychology and music to gain certification.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 21, 1988
In Dennis McDougal's interview with Paul Moyer and Ann Martin of KABC ("Moyer & Martin--Cool, Cute and Credible," Feb. 14), Ann Martin said, "You have to have a thick skin in this business." But then she turns around and relates how she "cried and cried" when the management of a Seattle TV station suggested that she have speech therapy. Boy, oh boy, talk about your dizzy contradictions!! DAVID CURRIER Walnut
BUSINESS
February 25, 2011 | By Stephen Ceasar, Los Angeles Times
Credit the "The King's Speech" for 12 Oscar nominations, $236 million in worldwide box office ? and a lot more business for speech therapists. Across the nation, clinics specializing in speech disorders and stutterers themselves say the film about British King George VI's battle to overcome a lifelong stammer has inspired many others, often shy and reluctant to seek assistance, to reach out for professional help. At the Stuttering Foundation of America, a nonprofit organization that provides information on stuttering and referrals to therapists nationwide, donations have shot up 20% since the movie opened, officials said.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 31, 1985 | Roxana Kopetman \f7
A convalescent home and congregate care facility, where the elderly will have their own apartments but share a dining area, are in the works for a three-acre site on South Beach Boulevard. Plans for both the 138-bed convalescent home at 631 S. Beach Blvd.
BUSINESS
February 25, 2011 | By Stephen Ceasar, Los Angeles Times
Credit the "The King's Speech" for 12 Oscar nominations, $236 million in worldwide box office ? and a lot more business for speech therapists. Across the nation, clinics specializing in speech disorders and stutterers themselves say the film about British King George VI's battle to overcome a lifelong stammer has inspired many others, often shy and reluctant to seek assistance, to reach out for professional help. At the Stuttering Foundation of America, a nonprofit organization that provides information on stuttering and referrals to therapists nationwide, donations have shot up 20% since the movie opened, officials said.
NATIONAL
January 26, 2011 | By Abby Sewell, Los Angeles Times
Arizona Rep. Gabrielle Giffords, whose condition was upgraded from serious to good this week, has begun an intense regimen of full-time rehabilitation after a successful move between Houston medical facilities. Although she faces a long recovery, doctors said, she has progressed at "lightning speed" given the severity of her injuries. In Houston, she has been interacting with hospital staff and following commands. Giffords was shot in the head Jan. 8 during an event with constituents outside a Tucson supermarket.
NATIONAL
January 20, 2011 | By Thomas H. Maugh II, Los Angeles Times
Rep. Gabrielle Giffords' recovery is proceeding so well that she will be moved to a rehabilitation facility in Houston, possibly as early as Friday, according to a statement released Wednesday by her family. Such a move less than two weeks after a bullet passed through one hemisphere of her brain represents a remarkable achievement that reflects not only the speed with which Giffords was brought to the hospital and into the operating room but also the quality of care she has received.
NATIONAL
January 14, 2011 | By Thomas H. Maugh II and Seema Mehta, Los Angeles Times
Physicians at University Medical Center may try to remove Rep. Gabrielle Giffords' breathing tube on Saturday, the next major hurdle in her recovery, Dr. Peter Rhee said Friday morning in Tucson. Doing so will finally allow them to assess how well she is able to talk after being shot in the head last Saturday morning in the mass shooting outside a Safeway. Her recovery continues to amaze the doctors who have been treating her. "We couldn't have hoped for any better improvement than we are seeing now given the severity of her injury," said Dr. Michael Lemole, a neurosurgeon who has been a key member of the team treating her. During the week, Giffords has passed a number of milestones, including moving her hands and arms, opening her eyes, responding to commands, sitting up in bed and lifting her legs.
HEALTH
November 29, 2010 | By Maria McGrath, Special to the Los Angeles Times
My childhood, adolescence and part of my adult life were plagued by a debilitating stutter. Can you imagine being terrified to say your own name, order food in a restaurant, ask a question in school or even answer the telephone? That was my life. When I was 5 years old in Ireland and my mother was in the hospital, our neighbor picked my siblings and me up for school and asked who was looking after the baby. I tried to say "Daddy," but the best I could muster sounded something like "Paddy," which happened to be the name of our pet cow. This prompted other kids to make fun of the cow looking after the baby.
HEALTH
March 1, 2010 | By Melissa Healy
Yes, yes, it hath charms to soothe a savage breast (or beast, if you prefer to repeat a common mistake). But researchers are finding that music may be an effective balm for many other afflictions: the isolation of conditions such as autism and Alzheimer's disease, the disability that results from stroke, the physical stress of entering the world too early. The hope of music's curative powers has spawned a community in the United States of some 5,000 registered music therapists, who have done post-college study in psychology and music to gain certification.
HEALTH
November 29, 2010 | By Maria McGrath, Special to the Los Angeles Times
My childhood, adolescence and part of my adult life were plagued by a debilitating stutter. Can you imagine being terrified to say your own name, order food in a restaurant, ask a question in school or even answer the telephone? That was my life. When I was 5 years old in Ireland and my mother was in the hospital, our neighbor picked my siblings and me up for school and asked who was looking after the baby. I tried to say "Daddy," but the best I could muster sounded something like "Paddy," which happened to be the name of our pet cow. This prompted other kids to make fun of the cow looking after the baby.
BUSINESS
November 13, 2012 | By Chad Terhune
Medicare paid $1.5 billion in improper claims for skilled nursing care in 2009, federal investigators found. The inspector general of the Department of Health and Human Services said Tuesday that 25% of all Medicare claims submitted by skilled nursing facilities had errors and the majority of those bills were "upcoded" for ultra-high therapy that wasn't necessary. About 15,000 nursing homes and other facilities provide this physical therapy, rehabilitation and other care to patients, often after a hospital stay.
HEALTH
July 6, 2009 | Valerie Ulene
When my son's preschool teachers recommended that we send him to speech therapy, I can't say that my husband and I were completely surprised. Clay wasn't entirely easy to understand; his "r" sounded like a "w," his "th" was indistinguishable from an "s," and his "l" was essentially nonexistent. But he was only 3 years old. We believed his speech would clear up on its own with time, but agreed to have Clay tested for a speech disorder.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 24, 1998 | VANESSA HUA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Juan Rodas has learned to watch his tongue. The 5-year-old stared into a tiny mirror framed in the belly of a pink, one-eyed cat one recent rainy morning and was careful to keep his tongue behind his teeth as he practiced the sound, "sss, sss, sss." Sol, cebra, zapato--sun, zebra, shoe--the chubby-cheeked boy recited, as speech and language therapist Robin Garrett held up flashcards in English and Spanish.
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