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Speech Writer

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 3, 2000 | ELAINE WOO, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Horace "Buzz" Busby Jr., a speech writer, confidant and advisor to Lyndon B. Johnson before and during Johnson's presidency who also wrote a widely read political newsletter, died Wednesday of respiratory failure at St. John's Hospital in Santa Monica. He was 76. Considered LBJ's best speech writer, Busby wrote many of Johnson's orations on civil rights and other issues critical to LBJ's Great Society.
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ENTERTAINMENT
January 21, 2013 | By David L. Ulin, Los Angeles Times Book Critic
Tuesday at 10 a.m., staff writer Hector Tobar and I will do a live video chat about President Obama's presidential inauguration from a literary point of view. Last week, Tobar wrote about the lessons Obama might draw from previous inaugural speeches ; we'll talk about how we thought he did, and also discuss Richard Blanco's commemorative poem . Such conversations come up around every inaugural, which are, among other things, showcases for a president's acuity with words. Think of John F. Kennedy , himself a Pulitzer Prize-winner, or Franklin Delano Roosevelt , with his stirring declaration that "the only thing we have to fear is fear itself.
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BUSINESS
August 12, 1993
Kenneth L. Khachigian has been appointed "of counsel" to and will oversee the new San Clemente office of the PBN Co. of California and R&R Advertising of Nevada and Utah, a marketing, communications and political consulting partnership. Khachigian. a practicing attorney, was formerly a speech writer for President Reagan.
NEWS
December 9, 2010
David Seidler may have struggled with a profound stutter as a child, but he's recovered with a vengeance. Discussing his script for "The King's Speech," a pet project he pursued over decades and through a cancer bout (he's now in remission), he talks in long, uninterrupted paragraphs, with nary a hiccup to betray his former difficulties. Born in England and raised in the U.S. ? he maintains dual citizenship ? Seidler gravitated to the story of George VI (played by Colin Firth), known to his family as Bertie, whose paralyzing stutter was minimized with the help of Australian speech therapist Lionel Logue (Geoffrey Rush)
NEWS
January 20, 1989 | CATHLEEN DECKER, Times Staff Writer
It is a singular twist to his political life that George Bush, the East Coast aristocrat and Texas oilman whose inner circle teems with older and upper-crust men, found his voice in the words of a working-class daughter, a woman little more than half his age. When he sought to herald his campaign for the presidency, to break from the shadow of vice presidential anonymity, George Bush turned to Peggy Noonan.
NEWS
May 16, 1988 | Times Wire Services
Embattled Atty. Gen. Edwin Meese III fired the Justice Department's chief spokesman for not defending him aggressively enough, and Meese's top speech writer abruptly quit today in new turmoil stirred by inquiries into Meese's ethics and finances. Justice Department spokesman Terry Eastland told his staff today that he was fired Friday because, according to Eastland, Meese felt that the aide had failed to defend him aggressively enough against "any and all criticism."
NEWS
January 15, 1986 | RICHARD EDER, Times Book Critic
The Chronicles of Doodah by George Lee Walker (Houghton Mifflin: $16.95) "The Chronicles of Doodah" is an anti-Utopia; a fictional form that had its glory days with the likes of Huxley's "Brave New World" and Orwell's "1984," but has not been widely practiced since; science-fiction apart. The author, George Lee Walker, has spent much of his life in or about Detroit; a great company-store of an area where the companies make automobiles and are the biggest things around.
NEWS
February 7, 1990 | JONATHAN KIRSCH
Beyond Control: ABC and the Fate of the Networks by Huntington Williams (Atheneum: $19.95, 291 pp). One of my noontime haunts is the B. Dalton bookshop in Century City, where I often stop to see how many of the books I've reviewed in these pages have actually reached the shelves.
NEWS
June 7, 1986 | Associated Press
Peggy Noonan, a presidential speech writer, plans to leave the White House by July 1, Communications Director Patrick J. Buchanan said Friday.
OPINION
July 14, 1991
Sinatra employs so many flag-waving, God-fearing cliches that he could easily qualify as a George Bush speech writer. Let's hear it for "Mom's apple pie" and the Golden Rule! ED KYSAR Reseda
NATIONAL
January 7, 2003 | James Gerstenzang, Times Staff Writer
In the first insider book about the Bush White House, a former speech writer depicts a president who is impatient, quick to anger and sometimes lacking in curiosity, but whose shortcomings are outweighed by his decency and tenacity.
NEWS
September 22, 2001 | EDWIN CHEN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
When he heard about the World Trade Center disaster, Mike Gerson was home in suburban Virginia, writing a "communities of character" speech that his boss, President Bush, was to deliver in Cleveland several days hence. Gerson quickly got in his car and drove toward the White House--just in time to witness a hijacked airliner on its final descent into the Pentagon. Within minutes, he was conferring with senior White House aides on what Bush should say about the incidents.
NEWS
August 3, 2000 | MARIA L. La GANGA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Every action in the past year--every handshake, every airport rally, every bus trip, every pancake breakfast--has been building to this moment, when George W. Bush steps on stage here tonight, locks eyes on the TelePrompTer and begins to speak. The Texas governor has described himself as "not nervous but . . . anxious" about the speech he will give when he accepts the Republican nomination for president. Truth be told, he has the right to feel both.
NEWS
July 18, 2000 | HECTOR TOBAR, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Imagine what today's media consultants would do with FDR. During his long political career, Franklin Delano Roosevelt made hundreds of speeches, but not once did he mention the rather conspicuous fact that he was sitting in a wheelchair. Had he lived today, in the age of Oprah, when stories of personal trauma and redemption are all the rage, FDR might well have been pressed to place his disability at the center of his oratory.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 3, 2000 | ELAINE WOO, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Horace "Buzz" Busby Jr., a speech writer, confidant and advisor to Lyndon B. Johnson before and during Johnson's presidency who also wrote a widely read political newsletter, died Wednesday of respiratory failure at St. John's Hospital in Santa Monica. He was 76. Considered LBJ's best speech writer, Busby wrote many of Johnson's orations on civil rights and other issues critical to LBJ's Great Society.
NEWS
May 8, 2000 | BETTIJANE LEVINE
So what words of wisdom will graduates hear this year? Here are three examples of how speakers will tackle commencement addresses for the Class of 2000. * Actor Blair Underwood, (star of TV's "City of Angels" and the film "Rules of Engagement") is a 1988 graduate of Carnegie Mellon University in Pittsburgh, where he will return May 21 as commencement speaker. "The school asked me to keep it brief, to the point and inspirational," Underwood says.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 31, 1993
In his article about presidential/congressional relations ("Onetime White House Insiders Share Benefits of Experience," Commentary, Jan. 17), Kenneth L. Khachigian, speech writer for both Presidents Nixon and Reagan, knows how to turn a phrase. Richard Nixon fueled congressional resentment when "he continued the war in Vietnam and persevered to a peace accord. . . ." Persevere to peace? Let us give thanks that there was a limit to that "perseverance"; we still might be fighting and dying in Vietnam.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 3, 1988
I really do admire The Times conscientious efforts to present a balanced view of things . . . and to win back some of those subscribers you lose every time Conrad does one of his Reagan cartoons, but please be mindful of the public health. That piece you ran in defense of Meese by his former speech writer--or his mom, I forget which one--cried out for a warning from the surgeon general. While reading it, I practically choked to death on my brie. DAN RILEY Thousand Oaks
NEWS
October 19, 1998 | CATHLEEN DECKER, TIMES POLITICAL WRITER
It might have seemed familiar to Dan Lungren, the line that burbled out recently as he pondered how the next governor of California would deal with the state's projected population spurt. "We're going to have probably 18 million Californians, additional Californians, here between now and the year 2025," the Republican nominee said. "Eighteen million! That's the equivalent of all of New York moving here."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 28, 1997
With regard to Ken Khachigian's comments in the Sept. 14 edition, I hardly know where to begin. There are--believe it or not--some people who actually live in Orange County who never, yes, never, voted for Ronald Reagan for anything. There are people who do not believe in the "dribble down" theory of income redistribution or in building huge budget deficits. He will get the credit as there will be no problem remembering Ronald Reagan for many years as we pay down the deficit. It seems to me that the comments of this former speech writer would be much better put to use if offered at fund-raisers and political conventions, or perhaps an infomercial.
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