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Speed Bumps

NEWS
January 9, 1998 | RALPH VARTABEDIAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
At a moment in motoring history that has gone unrecorded, somebody invented the speed bump. Neighborhoods that want to throttle speeders love the speed bump, and millions of them are going up helter-skelter on roads across the nation. Many auto safety innovations are carefully researched and regulated. But the speed bump simply happened. And, not surprisingly, speed bumps now come in all shapes and sizes. The National Highway Traffic Safety Administration has never studied speed bumps.
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NEWS
October 7, 1998 | DANIEL YI, TIMES STAFF WRITER
They give peace of mind to traffic-weary residents and jolt the bones of rogue motorists whizzing down the street. But as speed bumps become more popular on the American road, they have found a new enemy in firefighters and paramedics who say the devices slow their response to emergency calls. Communities from Santa Monica to San Diego are struggling with the issue, while other cities such as Berkeley and Boulder, Colo.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 9, 1990 | LISA MASCARO
About 100 residents of Glenview Avenue and Holbrook Street say they intend to keep fighting to have the city install speed bumps along the roads to reduce speeding traffic. "I feel very positive about the (City) Council," said Marcia Clarke, an organizer of Glenview Avenue residents. "But we've done our homework, and I'm really tired of hearing of how expensive it is."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 29, 1990 | LAURA MICHAELIS
It was almost two years ago when Debbie Killelea, known for her volunteer work and for her efforts to have speed bumps installed in her busy neighborhood, was struck and killed by a drunk driver as she stood in the alley behind her home. The teen-age driver, who had been driving nearly 50 miles an hour through the Balboa Peninsula alley, was later convicted of gross vehicular manslaughter. As the community mourned her death, residents argued that it could have been prevented.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 5, 1987 | TRACEY KAPLAN, Times Staff Writer
Diane Halvorsen is really rattled. Her Van Nuys house shakes every time a truck drives over the speed bumps just installed by a supermarket next door. When she called Councilwoman Joy Picus' office, Halvorsen said, she was told that her only recourse is to sue the market. Hoping to get more assistance from city government, Halvorsen was the first to register a complaint at the Van Nuys Homeowners Assn.'s annual "Gripe Night."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 7, 1997 | JOSE CARDENAS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Dear Traffic Talk: Recently, three speed bumps were installed in a residential area on Highlander Road between Valley Circle Boulevard and Platt Avenue in West Hills. The bumps are very close together and seem to be an excessive way to stop speeders. Does the city have any plans to install speed bumps on other public roads?
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 8, 1992 | LISA MASCARO
The ability of residents to have speed bumps installed simply by gaining the approval of the majority of their neighbors may be altered under a plan to be considered by the City Council tonight. The council will review the city's speed bump policy and debate the effectiveness of the bumps in reducing auto speeds on residential streets.
NATIONAL
September 4, 2005 | Julie Cart And Kenneth R. Weiss, Times Staff Writers
As scientists review aerial photographs of devastation, the evidence of the next huge challenge facing the Gulf Coast jumps out at them: Katrina ripped through the coastline's few remaining barrier islands, and with the hurricane season half over, New Orleans lies naked to the ravages of future storms. "The entire delta is gone, destroyed," said James B. Johnston, a biologist who coordinates the study of Louisiana's coastline at the National Wetlands Research Center in Lafayette, La.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 27, 1988
After hearing testimony for almost two hours on a plan to slow up motorists on 10 streets by installing speed bumps, the Simi Valley City Council voted to add the safety devices to five of the roadways.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 15, 1996 | FRANK MANNING
Speed bumps will soon be installed along Rainbow Crest Drive in Agoura Hills by the request of neighborhood residents, who fear that uncontrolled speeding will bring tragedy. The City Council approved the project last year but delayed installation due to the city's strained fiscal situation. The council decided to proceed, officials said, because the project was deemed relatively inexpensive at an estimated cost of $17,000.
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