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Speed Humps

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 3, 1997
Regarding the recent decision to place speed "humps" throughout the area, I find that most unacceptable. In a big-clearance vehicle such as my Explorer they are bothersome at even very slow speeds. With my Ferrari, I have to come to a complete stop to negotiate them. Los Angeles has become a progressively miserable place in which to drive. Why are the powers that be making it worse? JAMES DITCHIK Woodland Hills
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 14, 2013 | By Matt Stevens
Activists on Motor Avenue heightened their call on city officials Wednesday to fix what they believe is a ticket trap at a congested intersection in their Palms neighborhood. For three hours during the morning rush, drivers going east or west on National Boulevard are not allowed to turn north onto Motor, a main route into Century City. Drivers who miss or ignore the signs often receive traffic tickets. From Jan. 1 to April 12, police handed out about 200 tickets for illegal turns at the intersection, according to the LAPD data.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 13, 1999 | KEVIN F. SHERRY
Residents near Tapo and Cochran streets want speed humps installed on their streets, but the city has not determined whether the neighborhood meets the criteria for the traffic measures. At a meeting last month of Neighborhood Council No. 3, a group of residents asked that the council investigate placing speed humps on Alpine and Fig streets, bordering a residential neighborhood southeast of Tapo and Cochran streets.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 15, 2001 | PATRICK McGREEVY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Concerned about injuries to schoolchildren, the Los Angeles City Council voted Tuesday to ask educators at 75 elementary and middle schools to support speed humps on adjacent streets in an attempt to enhance safety. The program was proposed by Councilman Hal Bernson of Granada Hills, who said dangers need to be addressed quickly. Bernson cited a July 6 accident in which a mother and her 3-year-old child were seriously injured when they were hit by a car next to Pacoima Elementary School.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 13, 1994
Los Angeles residents can begin applying to have speed humps installed on residential streets after City Council approval of the program this week. To get the speed-reduction devices installed, residents must collect signatures from 75% of the neighbors on their block. In most neighborhoods, they also will have to raise about $6,000 to pay for the standard set of three humps. Applications can be submitted through City Council offices or through the city's Department of Transportation.
REAL ESTATE
November 26, 2000
Speed humps ("Cruise Controls" by Marcie Geffner, Nov. 12) have always struck me as an example of NIMBYism. How many of the people who live on such streets are also the cut-through drivers and residential speeders in other areas? It takes one to know one. Still, humps also seem too frequently to be a violation of the spirit of the anti-speed-trap law.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 4, 1995 | SARA CATANIA
Speed humps are coming to yet another Simi Valley street, thanks to a 4-0 vote of the City Council Monday night. Councilwoman Barbara Williamson was absent. The council agreed to install two speed humps on Appleton Road south of Royal Avenue in response to a petition signed by homeowners in the area. A city study of the traffic flow found that 4,600 vehicles use the road each day and exceed the 25 m.p.h. speed limit 94% of the time.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 16, 1993 | RODNEY BOSCH
The city of Fillmore has adopted a policy on speed humps, providing homeowners a protocol to follow if they want to install the speed-control devices on their streets. Under the policy, approved 3 to 1 at this week's City Council meeting, residents must petition and receive approval from two-thirds of all homeowners living on the street before humps can be installed. Councilman Roger Campbell opposed the plan.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 20, 1994 | SARA CATANIA
Responding to concerns over speeding traffic, the Simi Valley City Council has agreed to install speed humps, a stop sign and increase enforcement on a busy street. Twenty-nine residents of a half-mile stretch of Kadota Street signed a petition asking for speed humps. A study conducted by the city showed that the speed and volume of traffic on Kadota between Alamo Street and Austin Avenue meet the requirements for the traffic-slowing devices.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 18, 1994 | SARA CATANIA
Concerned about safety and noise, Simi Valley residents near Royal High School have signed a petition aimed at persuading the city to install speed humps on their street. The City Council today will consider the petition, signed by 75% of the residents of Arcane Street between Erringer Road and 1st Street. A preliminary study conducted by the city showed that more than 85% of traffic on the street exceeded the 25-m.p.h. speed limit.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 24, 2001 | HUGO MARTIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Traffic-weary motorists who try to get around freeway congestion by cutting through residential streets will face a bumpy road if many Los Angeles homeowners get their way. Frustrated with increased speeding through their neighborhoods, homeowners throughout the city requested speed humps on 350 streets in the last 12 months, nearly 50% more applications than in the previous fiscal year, according to city officials.
REAL ESTATE
November 26, 2000
Speed humps ("Cruise Controls" by Marcie Geffner, Nov. 12) have always struck me as an example of NIMBYism. How many of the people who live on such streets are also the cut-through drivers and residential speeders in other areas? It takes one to know one. Still, humps also seem too frequently to be a violation of the spirit of the anti-speed-trap law.
REAL ESTATE
November 12, 2000 | MARCIE GEFFNER, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
When Robert Ades, a CPA and a homeowner in Brentwood, decided three years ago that his residential street needed speed humps, vehicles were zooming past at all hours of the day and night, and using the street to cut through from Sunset Boulevard into the upper reaches of Brentwood. Ades says the two biggest roadblocks he anticipated were "management bureaucracy and massive lack of cooperation from my neighbors." In the end, the bureaucracy was easier to manage than the neighbors were.
REAL ESTATE
November 12, 2000 | MARCIE GEFFNER, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Are speed jockeys terrorizing your once-quiet residential street? Are commuters using your street as a cut-through route to avoid a traffic-choked freeway or boulevard? Are you concerned about traffic safety in front of your own home? If you're facing a traffic crisis, help may be as close as your city department of transportation.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 24, 2000 | Scott Schudy, (949) 248-2153
The city will install three-way stops instead of speed humps along Ocean Hill Drive at Marina Vista Drive, Mesa Vista Drive and Sea Knoll Drive. The City Council also decided to have police services monitor speeds in the area more often. Residents on Ocean Hill Drive and surrounding streets complained of speeding drivers down Ocean Hill Drive, the only outlet to Stonehill Drive from the surrounding eight streets.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 18, 2000 | David Ryan, (714) 520-2511
The City Council voted Tuesday in favor of installing a speed hump on Skywood Street, between Buttonwood Drive and Driftwood Avenue. Residents on Skywood Street said vehicles were driving too fast in the residential area. About 92% of the residents signed a petition in favor of installing a speed hump--shorter and wider than a speed bump--to slow down heavy-footed motorists. Speed humps allow cars to pass over at speeds of 15 to 25 mph in relative comfort, according to the city.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 12, 1993 | RODNEY BOSCH
The city of Fillmore will install speed humps on one street as part of a pilot program to determine if humps or stop signs work better to control speeding motorists. Before a packed audience Tuesday, the City Council voted 4 to 1 in favor of installing four speed humps along C Street between Ventura Street and Sespe Avenue. Roger Campbell dissented. The council had considered a portion of 3rd Street as a site for the gently sloping humps.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 22, 2000
City Council members say they will reconsider a plea from Fletcher Avenue residents to install the city's first speed humps on the street. They rejected such a request five months ago. The council this week heard a city-hired traffic consultant's proposal to install three 8-foot-wide traffic islands in the middle of the avenue to force speeding drivers to slow down.
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