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Speed Metal

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NEWS
November 18, 1987 | ANN JAPENGA, Times Staff Writer
Members of the new underground gathered here late one afternoon in a metal-walled room padded with dirty yellow carpet. Singer Dennis Conant, sweat spitting off the tips of his frizzy locks, pressed a microphone against his lower lip and screamed the lyrics to a song called "Oblivion." A groupie watching him appeared to be enchanted. "The lyrics have a lot of pain," she observed. "Death is intriguing--I don't care what anybody says." The metal-walled room is a unit in a mini-storage warehouse.
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ENTERTAINMENT
November 14, 1994 | STEVE APPLEFORD
Sex and violence are no strangers to hard rock. But nobody approaches the special panache of Gwar, whose live act is so tasteless and extreme that none of it could possibly be taken seriously. For the theatrical speed-metal band from Richmond, Va., the stage is a battleground, a boxing ring, a slaughterhouse. At the Palace on Friday, each player was costumed as a kind of prehistoric warrior creature, wearing foam-rubber masks and exaggerated horns, teeth, genitalia and intestines.
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ENTERTAINMENT
October 2, 1989 | JONATHAN GOLD
German precision engineering has managed to make the common man feel like a professional driving to work in the morning, taking snapshots of the kids--heck, even squeezing juice--so it figures that someone, somewhere, would find a way to apply solid German high tech to thrash metal too.
NEWS
February 24, 1994 | JOHN JOHNSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Ever since Metallica burst on the scene with its city-leveling sound 10 years ago, parents have alternately celebrated the wild freedom and denounced the forged-in-the-furnaces-of-Hell sounds of metal music. Now, as analysts sort through the wreckage and gore of Christopher Golly's short life, eyes are once again turning toward the metal culture that he drifted into at the end. Friends describe Christopher as a devotee of what is known as "speed metal" music, favoring one band called Pantera.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 6, 1987 | CARY DARLING, Darling, a former associate editor of Bam magazine, is a Los Angeles-based writer who specializes in pop music
Jon Williamson, leader of the glam-rock band Sibling Rivalry, takes a deep breath when he thinks about the days back home in Denver when people picked on him because of his appearance on stage. Even most of the rock fans who saw him in clubs like the Party Place or Shotgun Willie's in nearby Colorado Springs thought all his pretty, shoulder-length blond hair and eye shadow was not in keeping with their idea of a male pop star.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 2, 1991 | JONATHAN GOLD, Jonathan Gold writes about pop music regularly for Calendar
At heavy-metal shows, sartorial custom demands that you wear a tour T-shirt from a band one level cooler than the one you're seeing at the moment. At a Judas Priest show, for instance, you would wear a Metallica shirt, at a Metallica show a D.R.I. shirt, at a D.R.I. show a shirt from somebody as obscure as Sepultura or Deicide. At a Napalm Death show, like the one at the Country Club in Reseda recently, there is no cooler band, at least not at the moment.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 24, 1992 | BILL LOCEY, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Lemmy, a.k.a. Ian Kilmister, is the man behind Motorhead, the British quartet of whom he once said: "If we moved in next door, your lawn would die." Motorhead--which has just released "March or Die," yet another album of raucous speed metal sure to anger parents the world over--will be in San Juan Capistrano on Monday night to play the Coach House. Because the bad will just be passing through, there's probably no need for horticultural paranoia.
NEWS
February 24, 1994 | JOHN JOHNSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Ever since Metallica burst on the scene with its city-leveling sound 10 years ago, parents have alternately celebrated the wild freedom and denounced the forged-in-the-furnaces-of-Hell sounds of metal music. Now, as analysts sort through the wreckage and gore of Christopher Golly's short life, eyes are once again turning toward the metal culture that he drifted into at the end. Friends describe Christopher as a devotee of what is known as "speed metal" music, favoring one band called Pantera.
NEWS
June 4, 1992 | BILL LOCEY, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Well, there's the Old Testament, the New Testament and, now, the loud Testament. The latter will be loud at length Friday night at the Anaconda Theater in Isla Vista. Fit in. Wear black. Testament will. The Bay Area quintet has just released its fifth album, "The Ritual." Judging by the cover of this one and the others, Testament appears to be the house band for Evil. Or it's what Freddy Kreuger has on his headphones as he boogies in Hell awaiting his dream date with Death.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 31, 1986 | DUNCAN STRAUSS
Speed metal (a.k.a. true metal, power metal and thrash metal) is accelerated, pulverizing rock that obliterates the boundary between punk and heavy metal. Imagine an early Black Sabbath album played at 45 rpm, except more dense and bruising. In recent years, several bands have embraced this subgenre, but probably the most prominent practitioner (along with San Francisco's Metallica) is England's Venom, which stormed into Santa Monica Civic Auditorium Friday night.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 4, 1993 | KATHERINE TURMAN
With its thundering rhythm section and hyper-speed guitar riffs, Bay Area thrash band Testament turned the Palace into a giant, sweaty mosh pit on Wednesday. Though the group is getting rock radio play for the first time in its five-year history with the memorable Metallica-like ballad "Return to Serenity," this no-holds-barred performance showed it was at the fast and furious where Testament excels.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 24, 1992 | BILL LOCEY, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Lemmy, a.k.a. Ian Kilmister, is the man behind Motorhead, the British quartet of whom he once said: "If we moved in next door, your lawn would die." Motorhead--which has just released "March or Die," yet another album of raucous speed metal sure to anger parents the world over--will be in San Juan Capistrano on Monday night to play the Coach House. Because the bad will just be passing through, there's probably no need for horticultural paranoia.
NEWS
October 22, 1992 | BILL LOCEY, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Where would the world be without Capricorns? Stubborn as goats, but fun, too. Who can forget Mao Tse-tung? Josef Stalin? Nixon? Also, Ben Franklin, Cary Grant, Elvis, Jesus, Rick Nelson were noted Capricorns. One thing is clear, the world would've been a much quieter place without one Capricorn, Ian Kilminster, a.k.a. Lemmy, the brain to blame for Motorhead. This guy is the ultimate rock 'n' roll Party Animal.
NEWS
June 4, 1992 | BILL LOCEY, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Well, there's the Old Testament, the New Testament and, now, the loud Testament. The latter will be loud at length Friday night at the Anaconda Theater in Isla Vista. Fit in. Wear black. Testament will. The Bay Area quintet has just released its fifth album, "The Ritual." Judging by the cover of this one and the others, Testament appears to be the house band for Evil. Or it's what Freddy Kreuger has on his headphones as he boogies in Hell awaiting his dream date with Death.
NEWS
May 28, 1992 | BILL LOCEY, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Indica is closer than most bands to living the rock 'n' roll dream. Actors dream of getting discovered. Rock 'n' roll groups dream of winning the battle of the bands. MTV, limos, the hits, the endless tours come later. For Indica, it all may come sooner. On March 9, they were crowned America's best college rock band when they won the Dodge Rockin' Campus Bash National Finals in Daytona Beach. They won a $2,000 cash prize and a recording session in New York.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 2, 1991 | JONATHAN GOLD, Jonathan Gold writes about pop music regularly for Calendar
At heavy-metal shows, sartorial custom demands that you wear a tour T-shirt from a band one level cooler than the one you're seeing at the moment. At a Judas Priest show, for instance, you would wear a Metallica shirt, at a Metallica show a D.R.I. shirt, at a D.R.I. show a shirt from somebody as obscure as Sepultura or Deicide. At a Napalm Death show, like the one at the Country Club in Reseda recently, there is no cooler band, at least not at the moment.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 14, 1988
Lita Ford is just like 5 million other self-proclaimed rebels that confuse being raunchy and decadent with being rebellious (Faces, by Dennis Hunt, Aug. 7). Decadence is the in thing, so bands or people that promote the sex-and-drugs-and-rock 'n' roll ideology are just conformists, not rebels. If people really wanted angry, aggressive music, hard-core trash and speed-metal bands would be at the top of the charts instead of all those weak Top 40 pop metal bands. TED WILLIAMS Whittier
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 12, 1988
The articles were very scary. It was disturbing to read how something so horrible can occur in middle America. I'm an 18-year-old college student attending Cal State Northridge and a heavy metal fan. I was taught in Catholic schools and I am very knowledgeable in the field of religion. It was terrible to read that the only reason these boys killed their friend was "because it's fun." Although the murder of Steve Newberry was very sad, I must say that in no way can this be blamed on heavy metal or speed metal music.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 27, 1991 | MIKE BOEHM, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A rock tour dubbed "Clash of the Titans"? You'd think they were putting on Wrestlemania rather than a speed-metal bill on Saturday at the Pacific Amphitheatre in Costa Mesa. At least Hulk Hogan is good for laughs and action, however ersatz. Slayer and Megadeth, claimants to metal titan-hood, delivered predictable darkness, doom and hellfire, managing to turn sensationalistic themes into stolid stuff. If this clash had a winner, it wasn't a titan, but an imp--Anthrax.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 14, 1991 | MIKE BOEHM, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The typical speed-metal band may break your eardrums, but it's highly unlikely that it will break any of the rules of its own genre. Sonically, speed-metal bands mainly try to approximate a train wreck in the making. Thematically, the tendency is to play back the latest teen-exploitation slasher film fare, with lots of gore and deviltry.
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