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Speeders

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 12, 1996
Re "Gunning for Speeders," April 4: Speeding is the primary cause of all motor vehicle collisions (according to the CHP annual report). Perhaps the noble efforts of watchdog groups like the residents of Beverly Glen Canyon would not be necessary if California would permit the CHP to use radar devices to catch speeders. HELEN SHANBROM Santa Ana
ARTICLES BY DATE
HEALTH
June 30, 2012 | Roy Wallack, Gear
Summer's here, and you know what that means: Lying on the beach and ducking dozens of colorful rubber and plastic projectiles. If you can break away from your Corona and dog-eared copy of "50 Shades of Grey," get up and join the fun. Playing ball games that involve hitting and throwing build coordination and flexibility and burn calories like crazy. And when you've worked up a good sweat, collapse back on your towel. There's a great one reviewed here too. Bad badminton Speedminton Fun Set S70: The new racquet sport, invented in Germany, features an extra-heavy badminton-style birdie called a "speeder" (shown above)
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 30, 2008 | Patrick McGreevy
Lawmakers blocked a proposal Tuesday to allow Beverly Hills police officers to use cameras to catch speeders, saying it would put collecting fines above stopping dangerous drivers. State Sen. Sheila Kuehl (D-Santa Monica) had written legislation for a test program in which Beverly Hills officers would hold a camera triggered by a radar gun that would record speeders. Tickets would be mailed to violators. But the Senate Transportation Committee deadlocked 5 to 5 on the bill. Sen. Jenny Oropeza (D-Long Beach)
NATIONAL
April 4, 2012 | By Richard Simon
The road through Hopewell, Va., isn't exactly paved with gold, but a mile-and-a-half stretch of interstate generated $2-million worth of speeding tickets for the town last year - and a fight between the AAA and the local sheriff.  AAA Mid-Atlantic, decrying "heavy-handed traffic enforcement tactics," said the 14,000 tickets written last year for a stretch of Interstate 295 through the town "appears to be about more than safety. " The speed limit is 70 mph. Sheriff Greg Anderson said officers won't write up tickets until a driver is going a minimum of 81 miles an hour.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 25, 1996
Re "Fear of Speeders Ranks With Drugs, Crime, Police Poll Says," Sept. 20: Hasn't Cmdr. Art Lopez, the Los Angeles Police Department's traffic chief, driven in L.A. lately? If he had he wouldn't be surprised that traffic was right up there in public worries, along with drugs and other crime. Maybe the cops who work for him are also oblivious to what's going on in the streets. Where are the cops when you need them? Stop at any red light and watch lines of cars run the light to get through an intersection.
NEWS
October 19, 1986 | ANN HEROLD
"Where's the fire?"--the highway patrol's often-used admonishment to speeders--is taking on new meaning in Minnesota. Only this time it's the speeders who may be asking the question. It seems the bright-red new cruisers being used by the state patrol can easily be mistaken for harmless Fire Department cars, much to the speeders' chagrin. The colorful new chapter in Minnesota law enforcement began when the patrol's 550-car fleet bought 146 new Chevrolets.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 30, 1994
The chronic speeder that struck and killed the young lady in Silverado Canyon is only one of thousands that Californians face each day. In the tradition of our great democracy, the state Department of Motor Vehicles is studying the problem of how this type of errant driver is punished. May I suggest a faster solution? Investigate camera/radar. Talk to a real expert, the chief of police in Edmonton, Canada, who has firsthand knowledge as to its effectiveness, having been clocked at 15 m.p.h.
NEWS
September 17, 1987 | ASHLEY DUNN, Times Staff Writer
Along the sun-baked highways around La Marque, Tex., people are still grumbling about the day Robocop hit the streets and made life miserable. The Texas city's version of the leading character in the movie "Robocop" was a camera-equipped radar unit that clocked the speed of a vehicle and then snapped a picture of the license plate and driver's face.
HEALTH
June 30, 2012 | Roy Wallack, Gear
Summer's here, and you know what that means: Lying on the beach and ducking dozens of colorful rubber and plastic projectiles. If you can break away from your Corona and dog-eared copy of "50 Shades of Grey," get up and join the fun. Playing ball games that involve hitting and throwing build coordination and flexibility and burn calories like crazy. And when you've worked up a good sweat, collapse back on your towel. There's a great one reviewed here too. Bad badminton Speedminton Fun Set S70: The new racquet sport, invented in Germany, features an extra-heavy badminton-style birdie called a "speeder" (shown above)
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 18, 1999
The 65-mph speed limit on the 10 Freeway is much too fast for the amount of traffic and a roadway always under construction. The situation is much too dangerous. What's with all the passing on the right? Isn't there driver's education in this state? I try and stay to the right and then move out for merging traffic. Yet oncoming speeders behind me often refuse to yield to my left turn signal (and even speed up). This is not acceptable. Everyone else has to pay high insurance rates for idiots who can't drive.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 30, 2008 | Patrick McGreevy
Lawmakers blocked a proposal Tuesday to allow Beverly Hills police officers to use cameras to catch speeders, saying it would put collecting fines above stopping dangerous drivers. State Sen. Sheila Kuehl (D-Santa Monica) had written legislation for a test program in which Beverly Hills officers would hold a camera triggered by a radar gun that would record speeders. Tickets would be mailed to violators. But the Senate Transportation Committee deadlocked 5 to 5 on the bill. Sen. Jenny Oropeza (D-Long Beach)
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 14, 2008 | Steve Hymon, Times Staff Writer
Beverly Hills Police Lt. Michael Hines knows the sinking feeling officers get when they pull someone over for speeding only to see other drivers go roaring past. He can't be everywhere at once. The dozen traffic officers who patrol this wealthy burg say they've watched it happen for years. While they work the city's busier streets, motorists are short-cutting on quiet residential roads, often tearing along in what Hines calls "wonderfully high-performance vehicles." Scottsdale, Ariz.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 17, 2008 | Steve Hymon, Times Staff Writer
"What we're dealing with here is a complete lack of respect for the law." Remember that line? That's Texas Sheriff Buford T. Justice -- the fat, foul-mouthed, funny bigot played by Jackie Gleason -- in one of the Sage's favorite road movies, "Smokey and the Bandit." I was thinking about Buford recently while on my way to Rancho Palos Verdes. Los Angeles County Sheriff's Deputy Chris Knox had invited me on a ride-along as he cracked down on traffic violators.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 10, 2007 | Lynn Smith, Times Staff Writer
ON a warm afternoon, deep in a shady, floral-scented section of Beverly Hills, officer Dave Rudy parked his car near a stop sign and lay in wait for someone to run it. Sure enough, within minutes, a mom in a black Range Rover -- who later said she was going to pick up a child at Beverly Hills High School -- cruised through. Compounding the crime, she then ran another one, as she turned from Charleville Boulevard to Linden Drive. A "California roll," Rudy called it.
OPINION
May 20, 2006
Re "Camera-Sly in Beverly Hills," May 16 Pity the poor residents of Beverly Hills. For years they prevented the construction of a subway line that would pass through their city on its way from Santa Monica to downtown. Now they are unhappy because too many cars drive through Beverly Hills every day. Rather than expending their energy seeking a law-enforcement solution to this problem, such as their proposed speed-trap cameras, they should jump on the mass transit bandwagon and demand that a line be built along Wilshire or Santa Monica boulevards.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 16, 2006 | Martha Groves, Times Staff Writer
Westside drivers, are you ready for your close-ups? Beverly Hills wants to launch a pilot program using photo radar to nab speeders in 25-mph residential zones. The plan might seem extreme, but Mayor Steve Webb said the city must do something novel to curb drivers who diverge from the city's increasingly congested main thoroughfares, such as Santa Monica and Wilshire boulevards, onto tree-lined side streets as they make their way to jobs, schools and shopping.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 19, 2006 | From Associated Press
A California Highway Patrol officer was in fair condition at a Roseville hospital Saturday, a day after turning his patrol car into the path of an oncoming vehicle while trying to catch a speeder. The incident is the latest in a string of accidents and deaths involving the CHP that caused the department to declare a so-called stand down last month to allow officers to review safety procedures and receive counseling. Officer James Malner, 41, was participating in a St.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 9, 2004 | Eric Bailey, Times Staff Writer
The railroad first arrived at this quiet agricultural village in the Central Valley about a century ago, linking its fruit orchards and farm fields to the big world beyond. Now a train hasn't been seen in a couple of decades. The tracks to Linden seemed destined to go the way of so many rail spurs across America -- left to twist and rot, historical remnants abandoned for a different transportation future. But a dogged band of rail buffs has a different outcome in mind.
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