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BUSINESS
April 26, 2012 | By David Sarno
Everyone knows Apple is popular in China -- so popular that people riot outside Apple's stores, or set up fake stores, or just crank out fake iPhones. On a recent trip to an electronics bazaar in Shanghai, we spotted a few of the most blatant of these knockoffs. Amusingly, the phones on display didn't look anything like actual iPhones -- instead, the manufacturers concentrated their piracy efforts on attempting to replicate the spelling of the names of popular devices and brands.
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ENTERTAINMENT
March 13, 2014 | By Betsy Sharkey, Los Angeles Times Film Critic
Sarcastic, sanctimonious, salacious, sly, slight and surprisingly sweet, the black comedy of "Bad Words," starring and directed by Jason Bateman, is high-minded, foul-mouthed good nonsense. I had wondered where Bateman's angry itch would take him next. The script, by Andrew Dodge, his first to be produced after many years in the studio trenches, is a good match of man and material. As an actor - whether a victim trying to even the score with Melissa McCarthy in "Identity Thief" or the ruthless top firing dog in "Up in the Air" - Bateman always brings an edge to his work.
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ENTERTAINMENT
December 14, 2009 | By Denise Martin
Candy Spelling is already famous or infamous; it can be hard to tell these days. The wife of the late TV mogul Aaron Spelling, she's also owner of one of the most expensive homes in the country -- complete with a doll museum and three rooms devoted to gift wrap -- and mother to " Beverly Hills 90210" star Tori Spelling, with whom she's had a publicly tumultuous relationship for years. Now she enters that not-so-rarefied world of fringe celebrities on reality TV. Tonight at 10, she will be the anchor judge on the new Ryan Seacrest-produced E!
NATIONAL
March 8, 2014 | By Paresh Dave
Legendary -- "very famous or well-known" -- How a Jackson County Spelling Bee coordinator  two weeks ago described running out of words to give to seventh-grader Kush Sharma and fifth-grader Sophia Hoffman in Kansas City, Mo. The pair survived 66 rounds before the list of words was exhausted. Slobber -- " to let saliva or liquid flow from your mouth " -- One of the words spelled Saturday when the pair reconnected for another 29 rounds. Boodle -- " a collection or lot of persons " -- What the Helzberg Auditorium at the Kansas City Central Library saw Saturday, forcing organizers to set up a television outside, allowing more people to see the duel.
BUSINESS
November 21, 2009 | By Lauren Beale
Eight months ago when Candy Spelling, widow of legendary TV producer Aaron Spelling, put her 4.7-acre estate in Holmby Hills up for sale, the $150-million listing price raised more than a few eyebrows. The 56,500-square-foot mansion remains the most expensive residential listing in the U.S., and there's no price reduction in sight. FOR THE RECORD: Candy Spelling's mansion: In Saturday's Business section, an article on the Manor, the most expensive residential listing in the U.S. at $150 million, gave the impression that Sally Forster Jones of Coldwell Banker's Beverly Hills East office had one-third of the listing.
OPINION
September 17, 2003
Re "A 'C' Change in Spelling Sought for the Koreas" (Sept. 15), about changing "Korea" to "Corea": The irony gods must be dying from laughter. South Korea and North Korea can get together peacefully to talk about spelling yet can't do the same when the topics actually get imperative -- topics like, oh, I don't know, the nuclear-warhead situation in North Korea. Well, if the talks for the spelling change do succeed and the talks for the nuke situation don't, causing a nuke to destroy the world, at least we will all die with good spelling consciences.
NEWS
April 26, 1994 | MARY ANN HOGAN
A movement to simplify English spelling has been going on for more than two centuries, but nothing major has ever come of it. "Reform efforts have all failed--partly because English spelling works so well, even though it's confounding," says Ronald Macaulay, a Pitzer College professor of linguistics. "Its strength is that it's written the same--irregularities and all--all over the English speaking world."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 18, 1993
As an educator, I was pleased to read the letter from Dr. Stephen J. Wilson in the Times Valley Edition of March 28. He is to be commended for his strong interest in the education of young children. Because his strong concern about the teaching of "invented spelling" may reflect the concerns of many parents, it is an appropriate subject to examine. But I say "No! No! No! Teachers do not teach invented spelling. However they do recognize that children learn to write by inventing their own spelling."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 11, 1998 | DEBRA CANO and LINN GROVES
Students in the Centralia School District will receive a minimum of 15 minutes of daily spelling instruction under a program starting this school year. "The ability to spell correctly increases a person's ability to communicate with clarity and fluency," said Assistant Supt. of Instruction Bobbi Mahler. "We want every child in our district to have that fundamental skill." Students will be tested each week to track their progress.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 9, 1997
Less than a week before the May 29 article on problems with teaching children spelling in California schools appeared, I was in the principal's office of my daughter's school expressing my concerns on this same issue. My daughter attends a good school and has had wonderful teachers, but I fear she will never learn to spell. Spelling errors in her tests and written work have almost never been corrected in her five years in school. Clearly, children cannot learn to do anything properly without feedback on their errors.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 28, 2014 | By Mindy Farrabee
Toward the end of "Half Bad," a debut young adult novel about battling witches by British author Sally Green, readers learn that the protagonist's favorite book is "One Day in the Life of Ivan Denisovich," the 1962 novel about life in a Soviet gulag. Why does he like it so much? another character asks him. "Because [Ivan] survives," he answers flatly. Likening the psychic terrain of young adulthood to a prison camp (where illusions die ignoble deaths and defying authority is a prerequisite for forging one's identity)
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 28, 2014 | By Scott Gold, Ruben Vives and Hailey Branson-Potts
A potent storm gave Southern California a more thorough soaking on Friday than it has seen in more than three years, bringing both cheers in a drought-stricken state and anxiety as it sent mud billowing through hillside neighborhoods and clogged roads. Downtown Los Angeles saw more rain by Friday afternoon - 1.7 inches - than it had seen during the entire rest of the "rain year," starting last July. For some, it was a harrowing day - for two drivers who were rescued after getting trapped by a rock slide near Malibu; for two men rescued from a downed tree in the suddenly roiling Los Angeles River; for hundreds who lost electricity when a power pole toppled over near a Long Beach police station.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 25, 2014 | By Hector Becerra, Ari Bloomekatz and Ruben Vives
It's poor form to complain about rain, even a whole lot of it, when you really need it. So Southern Californians will just have to grin and bear it beginning Wednesday night when the first of two major storms is forecast to move into the region. The storms are expected to deliver the most rainfall since spring 2011. They come as Southern California and most of the state struggles through a historically dry stretch. Last year was the driest calendar year in L.A.'s recorded history.
NATIONAL
February 24, 2014 | By Matt Pearce
I-N-D-E-F-A-T-I-G-A-B-I-L-I-T-Y. Indefatigability means tireless determination, but these students almost certainly know that. Two spelling bee competitions in the Midwest over the weekend had to be suspended and rescheduled when their brilliant young contestants dueled for hours to a temporary tie, having mastered dozens of bizarre and foreign words at an early age. After more than 60 rounds of the Jackson County Spelling Bee in Missouri and...
NATIONAL
February 24, 2014 | By Matt Pearce
The spelling bee rules are clear: There can be only one. But after more than 60 rounds of the Jackson County Spelling Bee in Missouri and more than 70 rounds in the DeKalb County Spelling Bee in Illinois over the weekend, there are still no winners. In each of the Saturday competitions, two contestants remain after their grueling duels stretched on for hours. Each pair was tentatively set for rematches in two weeks to determine who will head to the Scripps National Spelling Bee. In Kansas City, Mo.,  Sophia Hoffman, 11, and Kush Sharma, 13, were so good at spelling that the competition's judges ran out of words to give them.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 24, 2014 | By Meehan Crist
One day, David Stuart MacLean forgot who he was. "It was darkness darkness darkness, then snap. Me. Now awake. " He was a blank slate, standing in a bustling train station in India. Things went downhill from there. From these dark days, MacLean has created a deeply moving account of amnesia that explores the quandary of the self. The book's short, episodic sections are particularly well suited to evoking the hellish psychosis MacLean endures after "waking up. " These disorienting snippets of experience offer little reflection, context or connective tissue.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 11, 2001
Crossword puzzles, hangman and other word games are great fun--and helpful ways to practice spelling skills, build vocabulary and improve your powers of deductive reasoning. Since English words aren't always spelled the way they sound, activities that give you practice in visualizing how words are spelled correctly can also help you increase your verbal proficiency.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 13, 1998 | HOPE HAMASHIGE and CATHY WERBLIN and VANESSA DeRUYTER and LISA ADDISON
By correctly spelling "dilapidated," 13-year-old Lise Pham became the Garden Grove Unified School District's top speller and advances to the county competition in April. Lise, an eighth-grader at McGarvin Intermediate School in Westminster, placed ninth in the same competition last year and this year beat out 6,800 other students in her ascent to the top speller position.
TRAVEL
January 3, 2014 | By Catharine Hamm
NEWBURY, England - He is a farmer, she says, and she is a farmer's wife. They are active in their community. She writes a bit on the side, her writing room only recently having been wired for electricity. On my recent visit to her home, she was warm and welcoming. Her yellow Lab, Bella, followed her closely as her mistress ushered visitors into the house. And oh my. What a house. Two hundred rooms. Forty bedrooms. Silk wallcoverings in one room, 16th century Spanish leather wallcoverings in another.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 22, 2013 | By Teresa Watanabe
After several lean years, thousands of California teachers are winning pay hikes, bonuses and other benefits in contract negotiations - the fruits of voter-approved school funding increases. The $6.1 billion in new funds headed for schools this year courtesy of Proposition 30, a temporary income and sales tax increase, also will allow officials to rescind layoffs and restore days to the school calendar in districts from Napa to Long Beach. "On the whole, teachers are happier," said Eric Heins, vice president of the California Teachers Assn.
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