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Spelling Aaron

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BUSINESS
October 14, 1986 | Associated Press
Here is a list of Californians excerpted from Forbes magazine's 1986 list of the 400 richest Americans, in alphabetical order, showing residence, age, estimated fortune in millions of dollars and source of wealth. Figures marked x indicate the magazine assumed that a common fortune has been divided into equal shares. Avery, Alice O'Neill, West Los Angeles, 69, $375-x, Inheritance (real estate) Bechtel, Stephen Davison Jr.
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BUSINESS
October 11, 1994
Spelling Entertainment named executives Peter H. Bachmann, Thomas R. Carson and J. Ronald Castell to a newly established Office of the President that will oversee the day-to-day operations. Spelling is 78%-controlled by video retailer Blockbuster Entertainment, which was just acquired by Viacom Inc. A fourth member of the staff will be Steven R. Berrard, who was recently tapped to run Blockbuster by Viacom. Berrard serves as president and chief executive of Spelling.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 9, 2012 | Elaine Woo, Los Angeles Times
Fashion designer Nolan Miller put a bra-less Farrah Fawcett in a see-through blouse for "Charlie's Angels," Tina Louise in a slinky nude-beige evening dress for "Gilligan's Island" and Elizabeth Taylor in violet gowns for her "Passion" perfume commercials. He even made the goth-black number Carolyn Jones wore as Morticia in "The Addams Family. " But in the annals of television costume design, Miller was best known for his work on "Dynasty," the long-running, 1980s prime-time soap that made power dressing glamorous.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 26, 2006 | Brenda Hampton, Special to The Times
TV mogul Aaron Spelling, who died Friday at age 83 because of complications stemming from a stroke, left an indelible mark on the medium. "7th Heaven" creator Brenda Hampton, who worked closely with Spelling in recent years, recalls her friendship with the show's executive producer. * The first time Aaron Spelling ever called me at home, I was grilling a steak, and as I watched from my kitchen window, it went up in flames and burned to a crisp. It was Aaron Spelling on the phone. Wow.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 7, 1986 | NANCY MILLS
Eight years ago Gloria Monty performed emergency surgery on ABC's lackluster afternoon soap opera "General Hospital." The patient recovered. In fact, it grew into a money-making monster--not unlike Cosmopolitan magazine's resurrection a dozen years earlier under the guidance of Helen Gurley Brown.
BUSINESS
October 14, 1986 | Associated Press
Here is the Forbes magazine 1986 list of the 400 richest Americans in descending order of wealth, showing residence, age, estimated fortune in millions of dollars and source of wealth. Figures marked x indicate that the magazine assumed that a common fortune has been divided into equal shares. Walton, Sam Moore, Bentonville, Ark., 68, $4,500, Wal-Mart Stores Kluge, John Werner, Charlottesville, Va.
BUSINESS
April 30, 1991 | JAMES BATES
NOW WE KNOW WHY -- The first Times 100 in 1988 listed the most "undervalued" and "overvalued" companies based on income as a percentage of their book value. Among them: * Columbia Savings & Loan, a Beverly Hills thrift that failed in January, was the most undervalued. * First Executive Corp., whose main insurance units were seized in April by regulators, was the eighth-most undervalued. * Imperial Corp.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 8, 2007 | Robin Abcarian, Times Staff Writer
THE Sons of Hollywood were holding court at Koi, a sushi restaurant on La Cienega whose bouncers won't even let you in the door without a confirmed reservation. No matter. The Sons of Hollywood can get in to any restaurant, any club, any party they feel like because they are, after all, minor royalty in this money- and fame-besotted town.
BUSINESS
May 22, 1988 | BILL SING, Times Staff Writer
Eugene R. White of Amdahl Corp. and James W. Conte and Robert L. Green, both of Community Psychiatric Centers, last year made money the new-fashioned way: They exercised stock options. Lots of them. Each earned more than $6 million from cashing in lucrative options, propelling them to the top three spots on The Times' annual ranking of the 100 highest paid executives at California-based, publicly held companies.
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