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Spelling Bee

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August 12, 2010
Finally, a spelling bee that's rigged just the way we like it! 826LA presents "A Spelling Bee for Cheaters," a wily game of verbal daring and fraudulent spelling. The more money each competing team has, the more cheats they can buy on game day. Teams accumulate money through donations, which will benefit the reading and writing programs at 826LA. Lincoln Middle School, 1508 California Ave., Santa Monica. 2 p.m. Sat. http://www.826la.org/spellingbee.
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ENTERTAINMENT
April 2, 2014 | By Betsy Sharkey
If you haven't made it to "Bad Words," Jason Bateman's directing debut and sarcastic takedown of the spelling bee game, it's just become much easier to indulge in this guilty pleasure. Like Bateman's 40-year-old Guy with a grudge and unbeatable spelling chops, the movie is turning up everywhere now. The competitive spelling world, teeming with bright kids, obsessive parents and rigid educators, proves to be rich terrain for a caustic, clever comedy. The actor-director puts himself in good funny company too - Kathryn Hahn and Allison Janney among others.
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NATIONAL
May 29, 2013 | By Michael Muskal
The battle arena isn't an ice rink or even a basketball court. Nor are the combatants bigger, faster or outsized in any physical way. But for the 281 children participating in year's national spelling bee, the competition is as fierce as any sporting event. The verbal fisticuffs began this week, appropriately televised by the sports network ESPN, which will also broadcast the finals Thursday night. The winner of the 86th Scripps National Spelling Bee gets more than $30,000 cash and prizes.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 27, 2014 | By Alicia Banks
An Arcadia sixth-grader won the Los Angeles County Office of Education Spelling Bee this week in just over an hour with the word "thrombosis. " Kai Morita, a First Avenue Middle School student, beat out 24 other contestants in fourth through sixth grade at the Almansor Court Conference Center in Alhambra on Wednesday evening. First Avenue Middle is part of the Arcadia Unified School District.  In second place was Daniel Ozaraga, a sixth-grader at Santa Fe Elementary School in the Baldwin Park Unified School District.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 27, 2014 | By Alicia Banks
An Arcadia sixth-grader won the Los Angeles County Office of Education Spelling Bee this week in just over an hour with the word "thrombosis. " Kai Morita, a First Avenue Middle School student, beat out 24 other contestants in fourth through sixth grade at the Almansor Court Conference Center in Alhambra on Wednesday evening. First Avenue Middle is part of the Arcadia Unified School District.  In second place was Daniel Ozaraga, a sixth-grader at Santa Fe Elementary School in the Baldwin Park Unified School District.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 3, 2012 | By Matt Stevens, Los Angeles Times
Snigdha Nandipati had a personal photographer following her for much of the Scripps National Spelling Bee. When the TV camera wasn't looking, there was 10-year-old Sujan, snapping picture after picture of his big sister the national spelling champion while she met with ESPN commentators and received interview preparation. "He took the camera from me and he doesn't want to give it back," father Krishnarao said last week. "He really wanted his sister to win. " And when 14-year-old Snigdha did win on Thursday night, a national TV audience was treated to Sujan racing onto the stage and clasping his arms around his sister's waist.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 22, 1985
Teen-agers from a small private high school in Calabasas won three first-place prizes in a spelling bee staged Monday night for West Valley high school students by the Woodland Hills Chamber of Commerce. Viewpoint High School senior Roxana Rafik correctly spelled "gerrymander" to beat 12th-grade competitors from Canoga Park, El Camino Real, Chatsworth and Taft high schools, contest officials said.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 16, 1992
Re "School District Hosts Spanish Spelling Bee" (Feb. 8): I find the fact that the Anaheim City School District held a Spanish spelling bee unrelated to a class teaching Spanish as a foreign language to be absolutely amazing. Why, why, why? The last time I looked, California had passed the English Language Amendment, making California one of the many states that has chosen to reaffirm that English, not one of the 20-plus languages spoken by our new immigrants, will be used to conduct official business.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 31, 1995 | MICHAEL ARKUSH
Last year, Mario Matute came up with a new way to spell success in the city's housing projects. Matute, senior case manager at San Fernando Gardens in Pacoima, brought together youngsters from across Los Angeles to compete against each other for special prizes. It became a battle of wills--and words. It was a spelling bee, and it was a big hit.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 14, 1999
In 1925, a 10-year-old named Paul Kelly stood before a cheering crowd for the country's first national spelling bee, losing the contest after slipping up on a fancy word for scoundrel. Seventy-four years later, Paul Kelly stood before a cheering hometown crowd and proved that, at 84, he really does know his ABCs. In a charity spelling bee between teams of doctors, consultants and booksellers, it was a trio of seniors--average age 82--who won bragging rights.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 13, 2014 | By Betsy Sharkey, Los Angeles Times Film Critic
Sarcastic, sanctimonious, salacious, sly, slight and surprisingly sweet, the black comedy of "Bad Words," starring and directed by Jason Bateman, is high-minded, foul-mouthed good nonsense. I had wondered where Bateman's angry itch would take him next. The script, by Andrew Dodge, his first to be produced after many years in the studio trenches, is a good match of man and material. As an actor - whether a victim trying to even the score with Melissa McCarthy in "Identity Thief" or the ruthless top firing dog in "Up in the Air" - Bateman always brings an edge to his work.
NATIONAL
March 8, 2014 | By Paresh Dave
Legendary -- "very famous or well-known" -- How a Jackson County Spelling Bee coordinator  two weeks ago described running out of words to give to seventh-grader Kush Sharma and fifth-grader Sophia Hoffman in Kansas City, Mo. The pair survived 66 rounds before the list of words was exhausted. Slobber -- " to let saliva or liquid flow from your mouth " -- One of the words spelled Saturday when the pair reconnected for another 29 rounds. Boodle -- " a collection or lot of persons " -- What the Helzberg Auditorium at the Kansas City Central Library saw Saturday, forcing organizers to set up a television outside, allowing more people to see the duel.
NATIONAL
February 24, 2014 | By Matt Pearce
The spelling bee rules are clear: There can be only one. But after more than 60 rounds of the Jackson County Spelling Bee in Missouri and more than 70 rounds in the DeKalb County Spelling Bee in Illinois over the weekend, there are still no winners. In each of the Saturday competitions, two contestants remain after their grueling duels stretched on for hours. Each pair was tentatively set for rematches in two weeks to determine who will head to the Scripps National Spelling Bee. In Kansas City, Mo.,  Sophia Hoffman, 11, and Kush Sharma, 13, were so good at spelling that the competition's judges ran out of words to give them.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 7, 2013 | By Steven Zeitchik
TORONTO--Though there was a boomlet of them a number of years ago, Jason Bateman didn't see any of the spelling-bee movies, documentary or fictional, back when they came out. He did check out “The 25th Annual Putnam County Spelling Bee” on the stage, he says, but it was a long time ago and he doesn't really remember it. “I can't say I paid a lot of attention,” he said. “I know, that's funny.” Indeed, it's all a little ironic, since Bateman now created the latest, sharpest and certainly most R-rated addition to the subgenre.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 23, 2013 | Mary McNamara, Los Angeles Times Television Critic
If ABC Family executives had known their new game show "Spell-Mageddon" would be premiering in the social media vacuum left by "Sharknado," they might have considered throwing a few piranhas into the mix. As it is, the film and the series share little beyond titular portmanteau (blending two words to make one) and the attempt to blend two big ideas into an unexpected hybrid. On the hourlong "Spell-Mageddon," that looks like a group of contestants engaging in a spelling bee while running obstacle courses that are smaller, tamer versions of those on "Wipeout" and enduring the sort of wet 'n' messy interruptions that mark similar competitions on Nickelodeon.
NATIONAL
May 31, 2013 | By Michael Muskal
As far as Arvind Mahankali is concerned the fourth time was indeed a charm as the 13-year-old New Yorker overcame his unease with German-derived words to win the Scripps National Spelling Bee. “I had begun to be a little wary of German words,” Arvind said Thursday night, according to media reports of the final. “But this year I prepared German words and I studied them, so when I got German words this year, I wasn't worried.” Arvind earned his trophy and more than $30,000 in cash and prizes by correctly spelling “knaidel,” which as any Jewish mother will tell you is a type of dumpling, usually a matzo ball, often swimming in a bowl of chicken soup.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 8, 1992 | TERRY SPENCER
Maria Luisa Hernandez had no idea what pleuroneumonia meant when she spelled it correctly to win the spelling bee sponsored by the Anaheim City School District this week. And its definition can't be found in the Webster's Unabridged Dictionary either. Pleuroneumonia is Spanish for a lung disease similar to pneumonia. By spelling it correctly, the James M. Guinn Elementary School sixth-grader won the district's second annual Concurso de Ortografia , or Spanish spelling bee.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 12, 1987 | BOB POOL, Times Staff Writer
The last word from this year's Ventura County's championship spelling bee is L-A-W-S-U-I-T. A 14-year-old Thousand Oaks boy who claims he was cheated out of winning the contest has sued the competition's sponsors. Eighth-grader Gavin L. McDonald said the Ventura County Star-Free Press newspaper bent the spelling bee's rules to allow a Camarillo boy to unfairly reach the contest's finals April 8.
NATIONAL
May 29, 2013 | By Michael Muskal
The battle arena isn't an ice rink or even a basketball court. Nor are the combatants bigger, faster or outsized in any physical way. But for the 281 children participating in year's national spelling bee, the competition is as fierce as any sporting event. The verbal fisticuffs began this week, appropriately televised by the sports network ESPN, which will also broadcast the finals Thursday night. The winner of the 86th Scripps National Spelling Bee gets more than $30,000 cash and prizes.
SPORTS
April 9, 2013 | By Houston Mitchell
Wouldn't this be fun to hear at this year's National Spelling Bee: "May I have the definition please?" "No, you should already know it. " Well, things might not get that drastic, but for the first time in its 86-year history, the National Spelling Bee will require contestants to know what the words mean as well as how to spell them. To qualify for the semifinals and finals, spellers will be judged on a cumulative score that incorporates live spelling, computer-based spelling questions and computer-based vocabulary questions, organizers announced Tuesday.
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