Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsSpencer Abraham
IN THE NEWS

Spencer Abraham

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
May 20, 2001 | FAYE FIORE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Now that President Bush's energy plan has been pondered, penned and rolled out, the task of selling it to the American people falls in large part to a 48-year-old father of three who drives a green Chrysler minivan and jokes of having "a face made for radio." Spencer Abraham, the man who accepted the job of Energy secretary knowing precious little about energy, takes his place as promoter in chief for the plan designed to "finally put America on the right course," as he likes to put it.
ARTICLES BY DATE
BUSINESS
May 7, 2005 | From a Times Staff Writer
Occidental Petroleum Corp. said former Secretary of Energy Spencer Abraham, 52, was elected to the Los Angeles-based company's board of directors. Abraham served as energy secretary from 2001 until this year.
Advertisement
BUSINESS
May 7, 2005 | From a Times Staff Writer
Occidental Petroleum Corp. said former Secretary of Energy Spencer Abraham, 52, was elected to the Los Angeles-based company's board of directors. Abraham served as energy secretary from 2001 until this year.
WORLD
May 27, 2004 | From Times Wire Reports
Moving to ease the threat of "dirty bomb" attacks, U.S. Energy Secretary Spencer Abraham announced a $450-million global cleanup of nuclear materials to keep them out of terrorist hands. He was speaking at an International Atomic Energy Agency conference in Vienna. A dirty bomb would use conventional explosives to spread low-level radioactive material. Abraham said his first priority was to have about 330 tons of Russian-origin, highly enriched uranium sent to the U.S. by the end of 2005.
WORLD
May 27, 2004 | From Times Wire Reports
Moving to ease the threat of "dirty bomb" attacks, U.S. Energy Secretary Spencer Abraham announced a $450-million global cleanup of nuclear materials to keep them out of terrorist hands. He was speaking at an International Atomic Energy Agency conference in Vienna. A dirty bomb would use conventional explosives to spread low-level radioactive material. Abraham said his first priority was to have about 330 tons of Russian-origin, highly enriched uranium sent to the U.S. by the end of 2005.
NEWS
April 2, 2001 | MEGAN GARVEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Energy Secretary Spencer Abraham on Sunday reiterated the Bush administration's staunch opposition to using price controls to rein in skyrocketing electricity prices in California and elsewhere. Asked on ABC's "This Week" about New York Mayor Rudolph W. Giuliani's request last week for regulatory controls in advance of summer power demands, Abraham said the administration preferred to look for ways to increase supply or decrease demand. "Our view is that price caps on energy create shortages.
OPINION
December 23, 2001
It is with amusement that I read your Dec. 16 editorial, "Reality Test for Energy Plan." If "reality" is the test, it would help if you acknowledged President Bush's real energy plan. Our national energy plan was not premised, as you assert, on a short-term crisis; rather, it was based on a 20-year forecast of demand rising faster than supply. You also wrongly state that we have never defined "energy security." But it's clear in our plan. The best way to think about promoting energy security is the familiar concept of spreading risk.
NEWS
January 3, 2001 | RICHARD T. COOPER and NICK ANDERSON, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
In nominating one-term Sen. Spencer Abraham of Michigan to be his Energy secretary, President-elect George W. Bush is gambling that political savvy and the confidence of the boss will matter more than detailed knowledge of the subjects he must face. And, while Abraham's selection came as a stunning surprise to many in the energy community, some conceded that Bush may have had his priorities straight. Said Sen. John McCain (R-Ariz.
BUSINESS
March 9, 2001 | LEE ROMNEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In his first official foreign visit, U.S. Energy Secretary Spencer Abraham on Thursday met with top Mexican government officials here to promote President Bush's vision of a "hemispheric energy policy." Abraham's visit was short on concrete measures, but it signaled the importance of Mexico to the United States' evolving energy strategy and helped build on the new administration's relations with its southern neighbor.
NEWS
May 4, 2001 | RICHARD SIMON and DAN MORAIN, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
In a visit meant to underscore the Bush administration's heightened concern about the California electricity crisis, Secretary of Energy Spencer Abraham met Thursday with Gov. Gray Davis in Sacramento to discuss federal energy conservation plans. "I think we have an approach that can result in significant savings," Abraham told Davis. The energy secretary said he was in California "to gauge what we can do to add to what California is already doing."
OPINION
December 23, 2001
It is with amusement that I read your Dec. 16 editorial, "Reality Test for Energy Plan." If "reality" is the test, it would help if you acknowledged President Bush's real energy plan. Our national energy plan was not premised, as you assert, on a short-term crisis; rather, it was based on a 20-year forecast of demand rising faster than supply. You also wrongly state that we have never defined "energy security." But it's clear in our plan. The best way to think about promoting energy security is the familiar concept of spreading risk.
NEWS
May 20, 2001 | FAYE FIORE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Now that President Bush's energy plan has been pondered, penned and rolled out, the task of selling it to the American people falls in large part to a 48-year-old father of three who drives a green Chrysler minivan and jokes of having "a face made for radio." Spencer Abraham, the man who accepted the job of Energy secretary knowing precious little about energy, takes his place as promoter in chief for the plan designed to "finally put America on the right course," as he likes to put it.
NEWS
May 4, 2001 | RICHARD SIMON and DAN MORAIN, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
In a visit meant to underscore the Bush administration's heightened concern about the California electricity crisis, Secretary of Energy Spencer Abraham met Thursday with Gov. Gray Davis in Sacramento to discuss federal energy conservation plans. "I think we have an approach that can result in significant savings," Abraham told Davis. The energy secretary said he was in California "to gauge what we can do to add to what California is already doing."
NEWS
April 2, 2001 | MEGAN GARVEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Energy Secretary Spencer Abraham on Sunday reiterated the Bush administration's staunch opposition to using price controls to rein in skyrocketing electricity prices in California and elsewhere. Asked on ABC's "This Week" about New York Mayor Rudolph W. Giuliani's request last week for regulatory controls in advance of summer power demands, Abraham said the administration preferred to look for ways to increase supply or decrease demand. "Our view is that price caps on energy create shortages.
BUSINESS
March 9, 2001 | LEE ROMNEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In his first official foreign visit, U.S. Energy Secretary Spencer Abraham on Thursday met with top Mexican government officials here to promote President Bush's vision of a "hemispheric energy policy." Abraham's visit was short on concrete measures, but it signaled the importance of Mexico to the United States' evolving energy strategy and helped build on the new administration's relations with its southern neighbor.
NEWS
January 3, 2001 | RICHARD T. COOPER and NICK ANDERSON, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
In nominating one-term Sen. Spencer Abraham of Michigan to be his Energy secretary, President-elect George W. Bush is gambling that political savvy and the confidence of the boss will matter more than detailed knowledge of the subjects he must face. And, while Abraham's selection came as a stunning surprise to many in the energy community, some conceded that Bush may have had his priorities straight. Said Sen. John McCain (R-Ariz.
NATIONAL
July 25, 2007 | From Times Wire Reports
GOP presidential hopeful Fred Thompson is shaking up his still-unofficial campaign. Acting campaign manager Tom Collamore will still advise Thompson, but his political operation now will be run by former senator and Energy Secretary Spencer Abraham and a Florida GOP strategist, Randy Enright, said Thompson spokeswoman Linda Rozett.
NATIONAL
January 15, 2005 | From Times Wire Reports
The chancellor of the University of Texas System said in Dallas that he would recommend against the university making a bid to run Los Alamos National Laboratory. The University of California has run the New Mexico lab since its creation as a top-secret World War II project to develop the atomic bomb. But Energy Secretary Spencer Abraham decided to put the contract up for bid. His decision came after a series of management failures and security problems.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|