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Spencer Breslin

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ENTERTAINMENT
July 7, 2000 | SUSAN KING, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Lily Tomlin can't stop hugging Spencer Breslin as they pose for pictures in a suite at the Century Plaza Hotel. Breslin, all of 8, is blushing with all the attention. He better get used to it; after the release today of "Disney's The Kid," the young actor probably will be getting a lot more recognition for his performance as the overweight, emotional Rusty Duritz, who suddenly arrives at the house of his 40-year-old-self (Bruce Willis), now a nasty, driven image consultant.
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ENTERTAINMENT
November 2, 2003 | Carolyn Patricia Scott
At 11, Spencer Breslin can hardly remember a time when he wasn't on screen. At 3 he was doing commercials, at 4 he played opposite Dan Aykroyd in the "Soul Man" TV series, and at 8 he was the kid in the Bruce Willis comedy "The Kid." His technique, as it developed, came partly through immersion, with perhaps a bit of Pavlov thrown in. (On "The Kid," "every time I was good in a shot, Bruce'd give me a Tootsie Roll," Breslin says with a laugh.
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ENTERTAINMENT
November 2, 2003 | Carolyn Patricia Scott
At 11, Spencer Breslin can hardly remember a time when he wasn't on screen. At 3 he was doing commercials, at 4 he played opposite Dan Aykroyd in the "Soul Man" TV series, and at 8 he was the kid in the Bruce Willis comedy "The Kid." His technique, as it developed, came partly through immersion, with perhaps a bit of Pavlov thrown in. (On "The Kid," "every time I was good in a shot, Bruce'd give me a Tootsie Roll," Breslin says with a laugh.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 7, 2000 | SUSAN KING, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Lily Tomlin can't stop hugging Spencer Breslin as they pose for pictures in a suite at the Century Plaza Hotel. Breslin, all of 8, is blushing with all the attention. He better get used to it; after the release today of "Disney's The Kid," the young actor probably will be getting a lot more recognition for his performance as the overweight, emotional Rusty Duritz, who suddenly arrives at the house of his 40-year-old-self (Bruce Willis), now a nasty, driven image consultant.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 10, 2003 | Mark Sachs, Times Staff Writer
Leave it to the Disney Channel to tap into a desire that has crossed the mind of any kid who has had to share a household with an irritating sibling: "Why couldn't I have been an only child?" In tonight's charming original movie, "You Wish" (8 p.m.), 15-year-old Alex (A.J. Trauth) gets the opportunity to find out what life would be like without his 10-year-old brother, Stevie (Spencer Breslin), but the results are far different than he could have imagined.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 15, 2002 | GENE SEYMOUR, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
As we've lately come to realize, it's harder to look up to the skies and dream beautiful dreams when those same skies are capable of delivering man-made destruction. So one can understand the no-nonsense skepticism chilling the fantasy life of Jane, a gritty young girl struggling to keep watch over her little brother, Danny, while making her way through London streets bruised by bombs during World War II. Her father's away fighting the good fight while her mother ...
ENTERTAINMENT
July 7, 2000 | KENNETH TURAN, TIMES FILM CRITIC
Even in an age of relentless branding, calling a new family fantasy "Disney's The Kid" is a bit unnerving. Was there a worry about confusing eager crowds who might be expecting a re-release of the classic 1921 Charlie Chaplin-Jackie Coogan "The Kid." Or is there a whole string of other "The Kid" movies in the offing, creating a critical need to differentiate this from, say, "Almodovar's The Kid," "Scorsese's The Kid," even "The Farrelly Brothers' The Kid."
ENTERTAINMENT
November 1, 2002 | Kevin Thomas, Times Staff Writer
When "The Santa Clause," starring Tim Allen as a divorced, workaholic toy company marketing whiz who suddenly has the mantle of St. Nick thrust upon him, was released in November 1994, it deservedly became a popular Christmas movie -- a sweet-and-sour fantasy that connected with the frequently splintered families of the hard-driving '90s.
NEWS
March 18, 2004 | Susan King
Dr. Seuss' The Cat in the Hat Mike Myers, Alec Baldwin Universal, $27 This big-budget version of the beloved Dr. Seuss book is far from the cat's meow. Though the production design, costumes and the animated title sequence beautifully capture the mood and style of the book, the script is a crude mess unfit for kiddie consumption. And Myers comes across as a feline version of the "Coffee Talk" character he created for "Saturday Night Live," and his cat quickly wears out all of his nine lives.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 21, 2001
Theater In the West Coast premiere of "Glimmer, Glimmer and Shine," the new play from 1999 Tony Award-winning playwright Warren Leight ("Side Man"), twin brothers and former big-band jazz musicians embark on a poignant and playful journey toward reconciliation after 40 years of estrangement. Opens at the Mark Taper Forum on Thursday.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 21, 2003 | Manohla Dargis, Times Staff Writer
A sweet silly story with a girl and a boy, the book was created for wordplay and joy. The artist behind it was a Geisel called Seuss, a genius cartoonist and baby-boom Mother Goose. The movie takes place in a bright-colored town, a twee little burg unblighted by frowns. The girl and the boy are quiet as slugs, when along comes a Cat dressed up in a rug. The Cat is played by the comic Mike Myers, a zany Canuck whom I tend to admire.
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