Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsSpencer Haywood
IN THE NEWS

Spencer Haywood

FEATURED ARTICLES
SPORTS
February 18, 2001 | HAL BOCK, ASSOCIATED PRESS
Thirty years ago, Spencer Haywood went to the U.S. Supreme Court and won the right to play in the NBA. Now, the poster child for the underage draft thinks there are too many teen-agers in the league. "It has changed for the worse," Haywood said. "It's a bad thing. It's bad for the league and bad for the young people who come in unqualified. These kids are immature. They're not ready for the responsibility."
ARTICLES BY DATE
SPORTS
July 10, 2008 | Chris Hine
The NBA's shifting rules governing the eligibility of high school players: Before 1971 -- Players had to be four years removed from their high school graduating class before entering the NBA draft. 1971 -- The Seattle SuperSonics challenged the rule by signing Spencer Haywood after he had spent two years in college and a year in the ABA. Haywood argued that he was a hardship case and the Supreme Court agreed, saying the NBA was in violation of the Sherman Antitrust Act, and overturned the league's rule.
Advertisement
SPORTS
September 25, 2003 | J.A. Adande
Long before they shared the stage, they set the stage. Earl Lloyd was the first African American to play in a league in which three-quarters of today's players are black. Spencer Haywood fought the legal battle that led to the now-common occurrence of high school seniors receiving their diplomas and draft-night handshakes from David Stern in the same month. Two living pages of the NBA history book addressed the sport's future guardians this week.
SPORTS
September 25, 2003 | J.A. Adande
Long before they shared the stage, they set the stage. Earl Lloyd was the first African American to play in a league in which three-quarters of today's players are black. Spencer Haywood fought the legal battle that led to the now-common occurrence of high school seniors receiving their diplomas and draft-night handshakes from David Stern in the same month. Two living pages of the NBA history book addressed the sport's future guardians this week.
SPORTS
October 4, 1985
The Detroit Pistons waived veteran forward Spencer Haywood, who had ended a two-year retirement to try to make the team.
SPORTS
September 27, 1990 | JIM MURRAY
Spencer Haywood in his prime was such a devastating force on the basketball floor that rival coaches used to sit up nights trying to find a player who could stop him. Spencer Haywood saved them a lot of trouble. Spencer Haywood found one who could turn Spencer Haywood from a 25-point-average-a-night into a three-point-average-a-night player, who could cut down his average rebounds a night from 12 to two. And they didn't need to spend a draft choice to get him.
SPORTS
June 5, 1988 | SCOTT OSTLER
Spencer Haywood, who played for the Lakers during the 1979-80 season, says he plotted to kill then-coach Paul Westhead after Haywood was suspended from the team during the National Basketball Assn. Finals, according to a story in the upcoming issue of People magazine. In the first-person account of his troubled season in Los Angeles, Haywood tells of his fall into crack cocaine abuse and of the subsequent deterioration of his playing skills and attitude.
SPORTS
August 30, 2003
Once again J.A. Adande [Aug. 28] strikes his singular note of being the poster artist of the "Gimme Mine" generation. Today's subject is Maurice Clarett. But before young Mr. Clarett decides to take Adande's advice and go running off to the NFL, he might want to talk to some other folks for additional opinions. He could start by talking to any number of "sure thing" college running backs who saw their pro careers evaporate in the blitzkrieg of NFL defenses. Rashaan Salaam is probably free to take a call, or Ki-Jana Carter.
SPORTS
July 10, 2008 | Chris Hine
The NBA's shifting rules governing the eligibility of high school players: Before 1971 -- Players had to be four years removed from their high school graduating class before entering the NBA draft. 1971 -- The Seattle SuperSonics challenged the rule by signing Spencer Haywood after he had spent two years in college and a year in the ABA. Haywood argued that he was a hardship case and the Supreme Court agreed, saying the NBA was in violation of the Sherman Antitrust Act, and overturned the league's rule.
SPORTS
February 9, 1993 | JIM MURRAY
Lots of basketball players want to be remembered for their rebounds, three-point baskets, slam dunks, steals and blocked shots, but Spencer Haywood wants to be remembered for loftier legacies. He wants to be remembered for Supreme Court decisions, constitutional issues and the right of individuals to work where they choose. There never was a player quite like 'Wood, as the players liked to call him. He could do everything--or almost everything--Michael Jordan could do later.
SPORTS
August 30, 2003
Once again J.A. Adande [Aug. 28] strikes his singular note of being the poster artist of the "Gimme Mine" generation. Today's subject is Maurice Clarett. But before young Mr. Clarett decides to take Adande's advice and go running off to the NFL, he might want to talk to some other folks for additional opinions. He could start by talking to any number of "sure thing" college running backs who saw their pro careers evaporate in the blitzkrieg of NFL defenses. Rashaan Salaam is probably free to take a call, or Ki-Jana Carter.
SPORTS
February 18, 2001 | HAL BOCK, ASSOCIATED PRESS
Thirty years ago, Spencer Haywood went to the U.S. Supreme Court and won the right to play in the NBA. Now, the poster child for the underage draft thinks there are too many teen-agers in the league. "It has changed for the worse," Haywood said. "It's a bad thing. It's bad for the league and bad for the young people who come in unqualified. These kids are immature. They're not ready for the responsibility."
SPORTS
June 12, 2000 | LARRY STEWART
What: "Real Sports With Bryant Gumbel" Where: HBO, tonight, 10-11 * The lead story on the latest edition of "Real Sports" is about Spencer Haywood and the rule (formerly known as the hardship rule) that allows players to leave college early, or skip it all together, and play in the NBA. Before 1971, the NBA required all players to complete four years of college eligibility.
SPORTS
October 6, 1997 | J.A. ADANDE
NBA training camps are in full swing, and that sound you hear is teenagers depositing millions of dollars in the bank. One person you won't see cashing in is Spencer Haywood, the man who made it possible for all of these young kids to make money playing basketball while the rest of their would-be classmates are studying for midterms. It was Haywood who fought the NBA all the way to the Supreme Court to end the rule that said players could not be drafted until their college class had graduated.
SPORTS
October 6, 1997 | J.A. ADANDE
NBA training camps are in full swing, and that sound you hear is teenagers depositing millions of dollars in the bank. One person you won't see cashing in is Spencer Haywood, the man who made it possible for all of these young kids to make money playing basketball while the rest of their would-be classmates are studying for midterms. It was Haywood who fought the NBA all the way to the Supreme Court to end the rule that said players could not be drafted until their college class had graduated.
SPORTS
February 9, 1993 | JIM MURRAY
Lots of basketball players want to be remembered for their rebounds, three-point baskets, slam dunks, steals and blocked shots, but Spencer Haywood wants to be remembered for loftier legacies. He wants to be remembered for Supreme Court decisions, constitutional issues and the right of individuals to work where they choose. There never was a player quite like 'Wood, as the players liked to call him. He could do everything--or almost everything--Michael Jordan could do later.
SPORTS
June 12, 2000 | LARRY STEWART
What: "Real Sports With Bryant Gumbel" Where: HBO, tonight, 10-11 * The lead story on the latest edition of "Real Sports" is about Spencer Haywood and the rule (formerly known as the hardship rule) that allows players to leave college early, or skip it all together, and play in the NBA. Before 1971, the NBA required all players to complete four years of college eligibility.
SPORTS
September 27, 1990 | JIM MURRAY
Spencer Haywood in his prime was such a devastating force on the basketball floor that rival coaches used to sit up nights trying to find a player who could stop him. Spencer Haywood saved them a lot of trouble. Spencer Haywood found one who could turn Spencer Haywood from a 25-point-average-a-night into a three-point-average-a-night player, who could cut down his average rebounds a night from 12 to two. And they didn't need to spend a draft choice to get him.
SPORTS
June 5, 1988 | SCOTT OSTLER
Spencer Haywood, who played for the Lakers during the 1979-80 season, says he plotted to kill then-coach Paul Westhead after Haywood was suspended from the team during the National Basketball Assn. Finals, according to a story in the upcoming issue of People magazine. In the first-person account of his troubled season in Los Angeles, Haywood tells of his fall into crack cocaine abuse and of the subsequent deterioration of his playing skills and attitude.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|