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January 18, 1989 | DAVID STERRITT, The Christian Science Monitor
Anyone who watched American television during the 1950s knew Spencer Williams' face. He was known in households everywhere for his weekly portrayal of Andy, the silliest of all the silly characters on "Amos 'n' Andy," a popular comedy series with an all-black cast. But there was something most viewers didn't know: Just a few years earlier, Williams had been a full-fledged film maker in his own right.
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ENTERTAINMENT
September 11, 2009 | Susan King
Oscar Micheaux was not only the first African American to make a feature film -- 1919's silent "The Homesteader" -- he was also the first to make a sound feature film -- 1931's "The Exile." But whether the film had subtitles or spoken words, Micheaux always had bigger things in mind. "He was very much a moralist," Jan-Christopher Horak, head of UCLA Film and Television Archive, says of the pioneering director. "He certainly had some unique ideas about uplifting the race. For the black middle class at that time period that was the goal -- uplifting the race, getting them more political and social power."
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ENTERTAINMENT
September 11, 2009 | Susan King
Oscar Micheaux was not only the first African American to make a feature film -- 1919's silent "The Homesteader" -- he was also the first to make a sound feature film -- 1931's "The Exile." But whether the film had subtitles or spoken words, Micheaux always had bigger things in mind. "He was very much a moralist," Jan-Christopher Horak, head of UCLA Film and Television Archive, says of the pioneering director. "He certainly had some unique ideas about uplifting the race. For the black middle class at that time period that was the goal -- uplifting the race, getting them more political and social power."
ENTERTAINMENT
January 18, 1989 | DAVID STERRITT, The Christian Science Monitor
Anyone who watched American television during the 1950s knew Spencer Williams' face. He was known in households everywhere for his weekly portrayal of Andy, the silliest of all the silly characters on "Amos 'n' Andy," a popular comedy series with an all-black cast. But there was something most viewers didn't know: Just a few years earlier, Williams had been a full-fledged film maker in his own right.
NEWS
December 21, 1987 | Associated Press
President Reagan will name Vaughn R. Walker to succeed Spencer M. Williams as federal judge for the Northern District of California, the White House announced.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 27, 1993 | N.F. MENDOZA
Dorian Harewood will be the host of Sunday's "City View," which will feature the two-part documentary "Fade to Black: A History of African-American Film." The film, at 5:30 p.m. on KABC-TV Channel 7, covers the early work of such performers as Hattie McDaniel ("Gone With the Wind"), Eddie Anderson ("The Jack Benny Show") and Spencer Williams Jr. ("Amos 'n' Andy").
NEWS
February 28, 1985
A Santa Clara man who reportedly testified before a federal grand jury in the case of James Harper, who was sentenced to life in prison for conspiring to sell missile secrets to Poland, failed to appear in San Francisco federal court for his own sentencing on filing false income tax returns. Attorney William Butler said John Stouffer had not been seen for almost three weeks and called the disappearance mysterious. U.S. District Judge Spencer Williams ordered Stouffer's $25,000 bail forfeited.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 10, 1991 | CLAUDIA PUIG, Arts and entertainment reports from The Times, national and international news services and the nation's press
Filmmakers' Portraits Exhibited: Twelve African-American filmmakers are being honored in an exhibit of portraits that opens to the public Saturday and runs until Feb. 3, at the California Afro-American Museum in Los Angeles' Exposition Park. Honorees are Madeline Anderson, St. Clair Bourne, Charles Burnett, Ossie Davis, William Greaves, Charles Lane, Spike Lee, Michelle Parkerson and Melvin Van Peebles, plus deceased filmmakers Oscar Micheaux, Kathleen Collins Prettyman and Spencer Williams.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 5, 1996
"The Black Experience in Cinema," a monthlong airing of 22 films on cable's Turner Classic Movies, kicks off Tuesday with a salute to MGM legend Lena Horne. The evening features six of her movies, including "Panama Hattie" (1942) and "Cabin in the Sky" (1943). The Tuesday night showcases, in celebration of Black History Month, continue Feb. 13 with a look at African American film stars: Paul Robeson, Dorothy Dandridge and Sammy Davis Jr.; Feb. 20 will feature films starring Sidney Poitier; Feb.
BUSINESS
December 25, 1991 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Judge Rules for Dalkon Shield Victims: A federal judge's order lets a group of women who say they were injured by the Dalkon Shield intrauterine device sue in state court for higher damage claims. David Sabih, who represented the nine women in the case, said his clients now have a better chance of receiving compensation more quickly for injuries caused by the IUD.
SPORTS
December 3, 1989
The Orange Coast College men's and women's soccer teams won state titles Saturday at El Camino College. The men's team defeated Fresno City, 3-2, and the women shut out Cosumnes River of Sacramento, 1-0. In the men's game, Orange Coast (17-4-2) took a 3-0 lead after two goals by Andy Strouse and one by Paul Oldham, who also had an assist. But Fresno City's Mike Dedmond scored with six minutes to play and Spencer Williams scored with four minutes to go to cut the margin to a goal.
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