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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 21, 1992
It makes perfect sense. Congress spends its personal money the same way they spend the taxpayers' money. MIKE MILLER Garden Grove
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NATIONAL
April 3, 2014 | By Michael A. Memoli
WASHINGTON - Democrats struggling to combat a flood of outside money pouring in to defeat their candidates have found at least a temporary solution: If you can't beat them, brand them. The latest strategy of Democratic messaging is tying Republican candidates and policies to the party's most prominent - and at times vilified - financial patrons, billionaire industrialists Charles and David Koch. Senate Majority Leader Harry Reid (D-Nev.) initiated the strategy last month when he decried the brothers - whose last name is pronounced "coke" - from the Senate floor as "shadowy billionaires" and "un-American.
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SPORTS
May 22, 1993
Mike Downey may know sports, but he doesn't know his legends. In his May 9 column, he says Warren Rychel spends more time in the penalty box than Aladdin does in his lamp. Aladdin spends no time in a lamp. It is the genie who's in the lamp, not Aladdin. ANDY GOLIN Tarzana
SPORTS
March 30, 2014 | By Kevin Baxter
For more than two decades, the West Coast has played the part of Major League Baseball's strange uncle. You know, the one who is invited to the family reunion but hardly ever gets to sit at the head table. In the last 22 seasons, only three teams west of the Rockies - the team and the mountain range - have won a World Series. In 17 of those seasons, a team from the Pacific time zone didn't even advance to the game's biggest showcase. However, the tide may be turning. In the National League, San Francisco has won two of the last three championships and the Dodgers, with the game's highest payroll and best pitcher in 26-year-old Clayton Kershaw, seem poised to begin a dynasty.
BUSINESS
July 14, 1996
Let me see if I understand this: The telephone industry spends countless millions of dollars developing technology that will allow my phone number to be displayed to anyone I call if they have something called "caller ID" ("GTE Launches Controversial Caller ID in State Today," June 15). Then the telephone industry spends countless million of dollars developing the technology that will prevent my number from being displayed, thereby returning us to where we were on June 14. Now, that's progress!
NEWS
April 9, 2009
Health costs: An Op-Ed article on Tuesday said that more than twice as much is spent on healthcare per person in the United States as in any other country. The U.S. spends more than twice as much as the average of other developed nations, but not twice as much per person.
OPINION
November 26, 2008
Re "UC is considering limiting freshman enrollment in fall," Nov. 20 It is counterproductive that our state will threaten access to higher education to solve the budget crisis. I am only a high school student, and I don't have the right to vote yet. How fair is it to target students without a vote? Our state spends more on prisoners than on students. As someone who is applying to UC next fall, I take that as a cue that our leaders don't care about our future. If they did, they wouldn't have gotten us into the mess we are in. Andrew Tey Monrovia
MAGAZINE
May 19, 1991
"The $4-Billion Regular Guy," by Linda Grant (April 7), highlights a dichotomy in the United States today. We want an understated, frugal (cheap), unpretentious wealthly man who spends little money and contributes even less to the economy, other than getting the poorer folk to spend on his investments. If we all operated like Warren Buffett, the United States would be an up-and-coming Fourth World nation and Buffett would walk around in the buff. JAN ELLIS-LEON Los Angeles
BUSINESS
September 25, 2009
School has started again, but that doesn't mean those pesky child-care issues have been resolved. With budgets tight, many families find it's getting harder to pay for day care. That means Junior might end up sitting on Mom's desk every other Friday. We're looking for your questions about children and the workplace. If your child is sick, is it OK for you to take a sick day? What if your office mate spends hours on the phone dealing with his children and their schedules? And what if the boss' kid is your intern, and the kid is not so sharp?
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 15, 1998
This is how it looks to me. Sen. John Glenn (D-Ohio) spends 98% of his time training and preparing for his own personal "joy ride," and the rest of Congress and the White House folks spend 98% of their time bashing and investigating each other. So my conclusion is that they are all overpaid by 98%, and meanwhile the business of government is being run by second-level management. And they accuse the public of not being interested in the government. They are wrong--98% of us are interested.
NATIONAL
March 25, 2014 | By Maria L. La Ganga and Matt Pearce
ARLINGTON, Wash. - First, there was a roar. Then the trees began to twist. The last thought Gary "Mac" McPherson had before blacking out was that a tornado had struck the Stillaguamish Valley. The 81-year-old McPherson and his wife, Linda, 69, had been spending the sun-filled Saturday morning side by side, reading the Everett Herald and sipping caffeine - Diet Coke for her, coffee for him - when the landslide slammed into the home they had shared for most of their 46-year marriage.
SPORTS
March 23, 2014 | By Mike Bresnahan
The surreal state of the Lakers - they lose even when they win. They beat the Orlando Magic, 103-94, Sunday at Staples Center and ended a four-game losing streak with a career-high 28 points from Jordan Hill. But Pau Gasol couldn't finish the game, staying in the locker room at halftime after feeling dizzy and nauseated. He received three liters of IV solution, a sizable amount, and was to spend the night at a hospital for precautionary reasons. Lakers Coach Mike D'Antoni theorized it was an illness or influenza though admitted he did not know what caused Gasol's discomfort.
OPINION
March 19, 2014 | By The Times editorial board
Alzheimer's disease and other dementias not only destroy the lives of those who suffer from them but take a devastating toll on family caregivers and on those who must pay the cost of care. An estimated 5 million people in the United States suffer from Alzheimer's. But that number will increase exponentially in the years ahead because of what Robin Barr, a senior official at the National Institute on Aging, calls "an aging tsunami. " A highly cited published research analysis estimates that the number of people with Alzheimer's around the world will jump from 36 million today to 115 million by 2050.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 17, 2014 | By a Times Staff Writer
Singer Chris Brown is expected to appear in court Monday after authorities last week revoked his probation and arrested him.  Brown's arrest warrant specified no bail and a spokeswoman for the Los Angeles County Sheriff's Department on Monday said she believed the singer, who was arrested Friday, remained jailed through the weekend. PHOTOS: Chris Brown's Hollywood Hills home The arrest warrant was for an alleged probation violation in connection with Brown's 2009 conviction for assaulting his then-girlfriend Rihanna, authorities said.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 15, 2014 | Steve Lopez
My thinking on earthquakes goes something like this: If Lucy Jones won't do something, I won't either. She once refused to consider buying a house that was in a fault-study zone. And here's another no-no from Earthquake Lucy. "I would not live in an unretrofitted concrete building. Those are the worst killers around the world. " INVESTIGATION: Concrete risks But of course, thousands of people in greater Los Angeles live and work in such buildings. And despite warnings that go back decades, we are nowhere near coming up with a plan to make them safe.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 11, 2014 | By Catherine Saillant
Los Angeles supervisorial candidate Bobby Shriver has rejected voluntary campaign spending limits and said he will at least partially self-fund his campaign to replace retiring Supervisor Zev Yaroslavsky in the June 3 primary. In a declaration filed with the county's elections office, Shriver, a businessman and member of the Kennedy political family, indicated he would put at least $300,000 of his own money into his campaign. Under the county's campaign finance law, candidates can accept up to $1,500 per contributor if they agree not to spend more than $1.4 million for the primary race. Friday's action by Shriver removes spending limits for all the candidates.
MAGAZINE
July 23, 1989 | JOY HOROWITZ, Joy Horowitz's last story for this magazine was "Dr. Amnio."
REMEMBERING HER DAYS AS A young girl--"No one would have accused me of being a happy child"--Leslie Abramson has an enduring memory of her favorite means of escape. After school, at the corner luncheonette, she'd buy button candies and chocolate marshmallow twists (two for a nickel) and spend hours at the comic-book racks, reading. Mad magazine was good for a giggle. But it was the spooky stuff, the horror comics like "Tales From the Crypt," that she really loved. And hated, too.
NEWS
March 10, 1998 | MARY BETH SHERIDAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In the predawn darkness, the floodlit cathedral looms like a snow-covered mountain over this poor neighborhood. Inside, 15,000 faithful have been waiting for two hours, but they show no sign of fatigue. They are expecting their Moses. Suddenly, a pudgy preacher in a brown suit strides up the marble stairs to the altar, a golden tree trunk. Thousands of worshipers break into chest-heaving sobs. Others furiously wave white handkerchiefs and cry "Glory to Christ!" Samuel Joaquin has arrived.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 11, 2014 | By Paloma Esquivel
The chief executive of Orange County's toll road agency has agreed to resign after less than one year on the job. Neil Peterson, who was hired in May, was put on administrative leave in February after coming under fire for spending thousands of dollars without public scrutiny because of a provision that allowed him to approve certain contracts without board approval. Lisa Telles, a spokeswoman for the Transportation Corridor Agencies, declined to say why Peterson had decided to resign.
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