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WORLD
August 15, 2012 | By Edmund Sanders, Los Angeles Times
JERUSALEM - The founder of the Tel Aviv-based specialty firm raves about his product with the same gusto distillers reserve for their top-notch scotch. He's particularly proud of his "premium" line. Sure, it costs a bit more, but it's targeted at a more discriminating client. Dr. Jacob Ronen is in the sperm business. Among other things, as head of Cryobank Israel, the country's largest private sperm bank, he guarantees that his stable of superior donors includes only tall, twentysomething ex-soldiers whose sperm has passed rigorous genetic testing.
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WORLD
August 15, 2012 | By Edmund Sanders, Los Angeles Times
JERUSALEM - The founder of the Tel Aviv-based specialty firm raves about his product with the same gusto distillers reserve for their top-notch scotch. He's particularly proud of his "premium" line. Sure, it costs a bit more, but it's targeted at a more discriminating client. Dr. Jacob Ronen is in the sperm business. Among other things, as head of Cryobank Israel, the country's largest private sperm bank, he guarantees that his stable of superior donors includes only tall, twentysomething ex-soldiers whose sperm has passed rigorous genetic testing.
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NATIONAL
September 4, 2006 | From Times Wire Reports
Thousands of sperm samples were destroyed when the temperature rose undetected in a refrigeration tank at the University of Florida. Dr. R. Stan Williams, chief of the university medical college's division of reproductive endocrinology and infertility, said its "sperm bank is essentially wiped out." Most of the samples were from anonymous donors intended for use by couples with fertility problems. Up to 60 of the samples were from men who had banked their sperm in case they became impotent.
NATIONAL
March 19, 2012 | By David G. Savage, Washington Bureau
The Supreme Court justices struggled with applying an "old law to new technology" in a case that asks whether children whose father died before they were born or even conceived are entitled to survivors benefits under the Social Security law. The justices heard the case of Karen Capato, a New Jersey mother who in September 2003 gave birth to twins through in vitro fertilization 18 months after her husband, Robert, had died of cancer in Florida....
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 1, 1986 | SUSAN SEAGER, United Press International
It boasts a Frozen Semen Newsletter, a mobile lab for on-site sperm collection and clients including police departments and the disabled. Yes, it's a sperm bank, but the Canine Cyrobank Inc. of West Los Angeles is a sperm bank of a different kind. It's for dogs only. With sperm collected from more than 500 dogs from across the nation, Canine Cyrobank is the largest sperm bank for dogs in the West and among the largest in the world.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 8, 1993 | MARK I. PINSKY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In a case that hinges on the value of freezing sperm for later use, a Superior Court trial that opened this week is expected to determine whether men who use sperm banks should be compensated if the samples are lost. The lawsuit pits Carlos and Cathy Casas against the Santa Ana-based Fertility Center of California, which acknowledges that it lost two frozen samples of Carlos' sperm.
NEWS
February 4, 1991 | KATHLEEN DOHENY, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
The Camp Pendleton Marine wanted to spend as much time as possible with his wife after getting 36 hours' notice that he was shipping out to the Persian Gulf. But he made time to drive to a medical lab near San Diego State University where he entered a first-floor office, checked in with a receptionist and took a sterile collection jar into the men's room. A half hour later, he and his wife were en route home, with his sperm safely stored.
NEWS
April 12, 1992 | TOM GORMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Ten years after the birth of the first baby from his sperm bank, Robert Graham has a 1 1/2-year waiting list of potential mothers, a wall full of pictures of beautiful children and a shortage of good men. Although frustrated by the lack of tangible evidence that his theory holds up in real life, Graham remains captivated by the controversial notion that he can improve the human race by matching wanna-be mothers with the sperm of some of society's most scholarly men.
NEWS
March 9, 1990 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
A white mother who claims she was mistakenly inseminated with the sperm of a black man rather than the sperm of her late white husband is suing her doctor and a Manhattan sperm bank. In a negligence suit against Idant Laboratories and Dr. Hugh Melnick of Advanced Fertility Services, Julia Skolnick of Queens contended that her 3-year-old daughter has already become the target of racial ridicule and discrimination, court papers said.
NEWS
August 24, 2008 | Rob Stein, Washington Post
When Julie Peterson decided to have a baby two years ago, she picked a tall, blond, blue-eyed Danish engineer as a sperm donor to match her own Scandinavian heritage. But when she went back to the sperm bank to use the same donor to have another child, she was stunned to discover that the federal government had made it impossible. "I just cried," said Peterson, 43, who lives in North Carolina. "I was in complete shock. I hadn't thought about anything but having another baby with this donor.
OPINION
July 31, 2010
In a marriage of modern science and the culture of celebrity, a Los Angeles-based sperm bank is grouping donors according to which famous people they resemble. On its website, the California Cryobank asks: "Have you ever wondered if your favorite donor looks like anyone famous? You know how tall he is and his hair and eye color, but wouldn't it be great to have an idea of what he really LOOKS like? Now you can find out with a CLICK of your mouse!" Browsers are typically directed to pictures of two or three celebrity lookalikes.
NEWS
August 24, 2008 | Rob Stein, Washington Post
When Julie Peterson decided to have a baby two years ago, she picked a tall, blond, blue-eyed Danish engineer as a sperm donor to match her own Scandinavian heritage. But when she went back to the sperm bank to use the same donor to have another child, she was stunned to discover that the federal government had made it impossible. "I just cried," said Peterson, 43, who lives in North Carolina. "I was in complete shock. I hadn't thought about anything but having another baby with this donor.
NATIONAL
September 4, 2006 | From Times Wire Reports
Thousands of sperm samples were destroyed when the temperature rose undetected in a refrigeration tank at the University of Florida. Dr. R. Stan Williams, chief of the university medical college's division of reproductive endocrinology and infertility, said its "sperm bank is essentially wiped out." Most of the samples were from anonymous donors intended for use by couples with fertility problems. Up to 60 of the samples were from men who had banked their sperm in case they became impotent.
WORLD
November 6, 2002 | From Times Wire Reports
Workers at a Romanian car factory have decided to donate sperm to get the debt-ridden plant out of the red. "Our feasibility study shows that if 1,000 workers donate their sperm for several months, we can get enough funds to pay part of the plant's debts," said Ion Cotescu, trade union leader at ARO Campulung. He said the decision was made after media reports said a fertility clinic in the western city of Timisoara offered donors $50 a visit. The plant's debts are put at $20 million.
NEWS
May 3, 2002 | SCOTT HARRIS, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Marcus has two moms. And once the 15-year-old reaches his 18th birthday, Marcus expects to meet his ... well, what's the right term for the mystery man who provided the sperm that made his life possible? "The donor" is how Marcus Liefert thinks of him now. Certainly not "dad," even though Marcus imagines they might go out to a ballgame someday. How about "genetic father"? "No. I know that's biologically true, but that's not the term I would use," Marcus says.
NEWS
May 13, 2001 | DANIEL WOOLLS, ASSOCIATED PRESS
At the Miura ranch, a revered patch of the bullfighting world, bulls roam idyllic fields dotted with oak trees and wild asparagus as death awaits them in the ring. Nasty, smart and genetically unique, the animals bred at this compound near Seville also face a threat outside the arena--shifting bullfight tastes--and could conceivably die out, aficionados fear. So to protect Miuras and other rare bloodlines, Spain is building up a bull sperm and embryo bank. "It's part of our national heritage.
NEWS
August 9, 1997 | JULIE MARQUIS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Somewhere out there, in the sprawl of greater Los Angeles, the man who gave 8-year-old Brittany Johnson an incurable kidney disease may dwell. At least, that's what Brittany's family suspects. They have no way of knowing, not yet. They don't even know his name. He is, to them, still a number: "Donor 276." As a 24-year-old law clerk in 1986, he walked into the California Cryobank in Century City to donate his sperm for pocket money.
NEWS
August 25, 2000 | From Associated Press
The California Supreme Court has let stand a lower court ruling that anonymous sperm donors do not have an unlimited right to privacy and can be forced to testify in legal proceedings. Without comment, the high court Wednesday unanimously upheld a May appellate court decision demanding that a man, identified only as Donor 276, testify in a lawsuit against a Culver City sperm bank.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 20, 1998 | MARCIDA DODSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A fertility patient whose eggs were implanted in another woman who later bore a son has agreed to settle her lawsuit against the University of California for $460,000, one of the larger amounts in the UCI fertility clinic scandal. UC has settled with two other former patients in recent months for $301,107 and $25,000, bringing the total number of settled cases in the scandal to about 75 and costing nearly $15 million. About 20 other cases have yet to be resolved.
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