Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsSpermicides
IN THE NEWS

Spermicides

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
January 16, 1987 | HARRY NELSON, Times Medical Writer
In a unique research project, scientists in Los Angeles soon will begin a federally funded human study to see if condoms and spermicides can prevent the spread of the AIDS virus. Tests have suggested that spermicides can kill the AIDS virus in a laboratory dish, but no tests have ever been done to test their effectiveness in humans.
ARTICLES BY DATE
SCIENCE
October 4, 2008 | Mark Pratt, Associated Press
Deborah Anderson had heard the urban legends about the contraceptive effectiveness of Coca-Cola products for years. So she and her colleagues decided to put the soft drink to the test. In the lab, that is. For discovering that, yes indeed, Coke is a spermicide, Anderson and her team are among this year's winners of the Ig Nobel Prize, the annual award given by the Annals of Improbable Research magazine to oddball but often surprisingly practical scientific achievements.
Advertisement
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 21, 1990 | Times science writer Thomas H. Maugh II reports from the annual meeting of the American Society for Microbiology held last week in Anaheim. and
Use of nonoxynol-9, the active component in many spermicidal creams and foams, increases the risk of recurrent cystitis and yeast infections in women, according to Dr. Jackie McGroarty of Toronto General Hospital. Tests in the laboratory, she said, show that nonoxynol-9 serves as a nutrient that promotes the growth of the Eschericia coli bacteria that cause cystitis, as well as Candida albicans, the yeast responsible for vaginal infections.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 28, 2003 | Lisa Richardson, Times Staff Writer
Quiet efforts to persuade some of the nation's largest producers of condoms to stop using a spermicide that may increase the risk of HIV and urinary tract infections haven't worked, so several legislators, AIDS activists and women's groups set out Wednesday to shame them into it.
OPINION
November 10, 1991 | DEBORAH A. COHEN and ERIN A. QUINN, Dr. Deborah A. Cohen and Dr. Erin A. Quinn are assistant professors in the Department of Family Medicine at USC. They are conducting research on AIDS prevention for high-risk populations and work with the AIDS Education and Training Center for Southern California
Magic Johnson's announcement that he is infected with the HIV virus underscores the findings of researchers across the country that only modest changes in the sexual behavior of Americans have occurred over the past decade. Unless a more aggressive approach to increasing the practice of safer sex is taken quickly, the AIDS epidemic may devastate America in the same manner as it has done in several African countries including Uganda, where one in five citizens in urban areas is infected.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 23, 1987 | Compiled from Times staff and wire service reports
Two new studies have turned up no evidence that spermicides cause birth defects, and researchers say the findings should relieve lingering doubts about the safety of this form of birth control. These results are important, they said, because many women are concerned about the potential hazards of spermicides and because intra-uterine devices now are largely unavailable. The latest studies looked for links between spermicides and five different categories of birth defect, but found none.
NEWS
September 19, 1989 | ALLAN PARACHINI, Times Staff Writer
The most widely used spermicide may not offer the best protection against sexually transmitted diseases. Instead, new research data concludes, the active ingredient in only one contraceptive jelly marketed in the United States and another chemical not in any American product were the most effective in tests against diseases such as herpes, chlamydia, gonorrhea and AIDS.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 20, 1998
Spermicides are an effective form of birth control but provide no protection against sexually transmitted diseases, including AIDS, according to researchers from Family Health International of Durham, N.C. Dr. Ronald E. Roddy and his colleagues studied 1,292 HIV-negative prostitutes in Cameroon and found that combining the common spermicide nonoxynol 9 with condoms was no more effective than condoms alone.
BUSINESS
October 22, 1985 | CARLA LAZZARESCHI, Times Staff Writer
VLI Corp. of Irvine said Monday that it has received a $1-million federal grant to study the effectiveness and safety of a new high-potency spermicide for possible use in the company's Today brand contraceptive sponge. The three-year grant from the Child Health Institute, one of the National Institutes of Health in Bethesda, Md.
SCIENCE
October 4, 2008 | Mark Pratt, Associated Press
Deborah Anderson had heard the urban legends about the contraceptive effectiveness of Coca-Cola products for years. So she and her colleagues decided to put the soft drink to the test. In the lab, that is. For discovering that, yes indeed, Coke is a spermicide, Anderson and her team are among this year's winners of the Ig Nobel Prize, the annual award given by the Annals of Improbable Research magazine to oddball but often surprisingly practical scientific achievements.
HEALTH
April 28, 2003 | Jane E. Allen, Times Staff Writer
Women have a new contraceptive option in the FemCap, a silicone rubber device that fits snugly over the cervix and blocks the passage of sperm. FemCap, which has been available in some European countries, is designed a bit differently from other barrier contraceptives that cover the cervix. With the cervical cap and diaphragm, spermicide gels or creams are applied inside the dome of the cap, which sits on the cervix.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 20, 1998
Spermicides are an effective form of birth control but provide no protection against sexually transmitted diseases, including AIDS, according to researchers from Family Health International of Durham, N.C. Dr. Ronald E. Roddy and his colleagues studied 1,292 HIV-negative prostitutes in Cameroon and found that combining the common spermicide nonoxynol 9 with condoms was no more effective than condoms alone.
OPINION
November 10, 1991 | DEBORAH A. COHEN and ERIN A. QUINN, Dr. Deborah A. Cohen and Dr. Erin A. Quinn are assistant professors in the Department of Family Medicine at USC. They are conducting research on AIDS prevention for high-risk populations and work with the AIDS Education and Training Center for Southern California
Magic Johnson's announcement that he is infected with the HIV virus underscores the findings of researchers across the country that only modest changes in the sexual behavior of Americans have occurred over the past decade. Unless a more aggressive approach to increasing the practice of safer sex is taken quickly, the AIDS epidemic may devastate America in the same manner as it has done in several African countries including Uganda, where one in five citizens in urban areas is infected.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 21, 1990 | Times science writer Thomas H. Maugh II reports from the annual meeting of the American Society for Microbiology held last week in Anaheim. and
Use of nonoxynol-9, the active component in many spermicidal creams and foams, increases the risk of recurrent cystitis and yeast infections in women, according to Dr. Jackie McGroarty of Toronto General Hospital. Tests in the laboratory, she said, show that nonoxynol-9 serves as a nutrient that promotes the growth of the Eschericia coli bacteria that cause cystitis, as well as Candida albicans, the yeast responsible for vaginal infections.
NEWS
September 19, 1989 | ALLAN PARACHINI, Times Staff Writer
The most widely used spermicide may not offer the best protection against sexually transmitted diseases. Instead, new research data concludes, the active ingredient in only one contraceptive jelly marketed in the United States and another chemical not in any American product were the most effective in tests against diseases such as herpes, chlamydia, gonorrhea and AIDS.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 23, 1987 | Compiled from Times staff and wire service reports
Two new studies have turned up no evidence that spermicides cause birth defects, and researchers say the findings should relieve lingering doubts about the safety of this form of birth control. These results are important, they said, because many women are concerned about the potential hazards of spermicides and because intra-uterine devices now are largely unavailable. The latest studies looked for links between spermicides and five different categories of birth defect, but found none.
HEALTH
April 28, 2003 | Jane E. Allen, Times Staff Writer
Women have a new contraceptive option in the FemCap, a silicone rubber device that fits snugly over the cervix and blocks the passage of sperm. FemCap, which has been available in some European countries, is designed a bit differently from other barrier contraceptives that cover the cervix. With the cervical cap and diaphragm, spermicide gels or creams are applied inside the dome of the cap, which sits on the cervix.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 28, 2003 | Lisa Richardson, Times Staff Writer
Quiet efforts to persuade some of the nation's largest producers of condoms to stop using a spermicide that may increase the risk of HIV and urinary tract infections haven't worked, so several legislators, AIDS activists and women's groups set out Wednesday to shame them into it.
NEWS
January 16, 1987 | HARRY NELSON, Times Medical Writer
In a unique research project, scientists in Los Angeles soon will begin a federally funded human study to see if condoms and spermicides can prevent the spread of the AIDS virus. Tests have suggested that spermicides can kill the AIDS virus in a laboratory dish, but no tests have ever been done to test their effectiveness in humans.
BUSINESS
October 22, 1985 | CARLA LAZZARESCHI, Times Staff Writer
VLI Corp. of Irvine said Monday that it has received a $1-million federal grant to study the effectiveness and safety of a new high-potency spermicide for possible use in the company's Today brand contraceptive sponge. The three-year grant from the Child Health Institute, one of the National Institutes of Health in Bethesda, Md.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|