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July 24, 2011 | By Alexandra Drosu, Special to the Los Angeles Times
As summer heats up, we've learned to slather SPF 15 or higher all over our bodies and faces in an effort to prevent sun damage and skin cancer. We've also been told to recite our ABCs when checking for unusual moles: asymmetry, border irregularity and uneven color. Unfortunately, our scalps are often neglected. Sunscreen is transparent on skin, but who wants to go to work with greasy roots? How many people wear a hat during their lunch break? And who can see a mole on top of her own head?
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NEWS
June 25, 2013 | By Adam Tschorn
The Headwear Association is planning to give away a whole lot of hats across the country this week as part of an awareness campaign about the damage the sun can cause to unprotected skin. As part of its annual Hat Day in the Sun, the trade group is set to distribute, free of charge, thousands of wide-brimmed, sun-protection hats on Wednesday in cities including New York, Boston and Boulder, Colo. A SoCal hat handout is scheduled for Friday at the Eagle Rock Farmers Market.  The free hats are being provided by Broner Hats, Dorfman-Pacific, Bollman Hat Co., Magid Hats, Wallaroo Hats, Korber Hats, F&M Hats and San Diego Hat Co. The group has also shared the following tips as to what makes a good sun hat: "Wide brims.
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NEWS
June 15, 2011 | By Thomas H. Maugh II, Los Angeles Times
The Food and Drug Administration issued new guidelines Tuesday for sunscreen labeling that will give consumers better information about the products' effectiveness and that will, for the first time, allow the bottles, tubes and sprays to say that sunscreens protect against skin cancer and early skin aging. The agency has been considering such regulations since 1978 and released some proposed rules in 2007, but subsequently concluded that the labeling system under consideration would be too confusing for consumers.
HEALTH
June 8, 2013 | By Karen Ravn
So, there you are in the sunscreen aisle, where the number of products on the shelves is approximately equal to the number of grains of sand on a beach. How to choose? Read the labels. Your decision may still not be easy, but new labeling regulations should help. "The new regulations will make a significant difference," says Latanya Benjamin, a dermatologist at Lucile Packard Children's Hospital at Stanford University. "They standardize the basics of what to look for in a sunscreen.
NEWS
May 25, 2011 | By Amina Khan, Los Angeles Times / For the Booster Shots blog
Does your sunscreen have what it takes to protect against the sun's damaging ultraviolet rays? Consumer Reports sized up 22 creams, sprays and lotions - just in time for beach-goers to start stocking up for summer. The sunscreens were put into three categories (SPF 30, SPF 40-50, and SPF 50+). The report also noted cost per ounce and what form the sunscreen came in. The products were ranked according to how effectively they guarded against UVB rays - rays that cause sunburn - and UVA rays, which go deeper into the skin and cause tanning and aging.
IMAGE
June 24, 2012 | By Alene Dawson, Special to the Los Angeles Times
Looking beautiful isn't the goal, but it's often a natural byproduct of the discipline, tenacity and good health required to be an Olympic champion. The beauty and fashion industries have taken note, sponsoring athletes, naming them brand ambassadors and featuring them on magazine covers, as Vogue did this month with a picture of tennis star Sabrina Williams and soccer goalie Hope Solo arm in arm with swimmer Ryan Lochte, all dressed in swimsuits and running on a sandy beach. Now that it is officially summer, we turned to some California Olympians for their thoughts on how to beat the heat and humidity that are intrinsic to their sports.
HEALTH
June 8, 2013 | By Karen Ravn
So, there you are in the sunscreen aisle, where the number of products on the shelves is approximately equal to the number of grains of sand on a beach. How to choose? Read the labels. Your decision may still not be easy, but new labeling regulations should help. "The new regulations will make a significant difference," says Latanya Benjamin, a dermatologist at Lucile Packard Children's Hospital at Stanford University. "They standardize the basics of what to look for in a sunscreen.
IMAGE
May 27, 2012 | By Susan Carpenter, Los Angeles Times
The beginning of summer always seems to be accompanied by an onslaught of sunscreens. The market is crowded with lotions and sprays, powders and lip balms, and, increasingly, multi-tasking products with inventive application methods that are touted for their ability to do more than just block the UVA and UVB rays that lead to sunburns, skin cancer and premature aging of the skin. Indeed, many of the season's new sun care products were designed to marry broad-spectrum sun protection with anti-aging compounds, moisturizers, makeup - even self tanners.
NEWS
June 9, 1989 | PADDY CALISTRO
You know things are really changing when George Hamilton, Mr. Tan himself, admits to being cautious about sunbathing. Not that he's swearing off, but having perfected his golden, rotisserie glow, he's teaching himself to play it safer. This new attitude accompanies his first sun product collection, George Hamilton's Sun Care System, which he will introduce Tuesday at Neiman Marcus in Beverly Hills, from 1 till 2:30 p.m. The 49-year-old ray catcher now admits that not even he is immune to the aging effects of his favorite pastime.
IMAGE
July 15, 2012 | By Kavita Daswani
Which BB cream is right for you? Here is a sampling of some products on the market or soon to be. Garnier Miracle Skin Perfector BB cream has vitamin C, tinted minerals and hyaluronic acid and comes in light-medium and medium-dark. It costs $12.99 at mass market retailers. Sulwhasoo Snowise brightening cream is originally from S. Korea and launched in the U.S. this year. It contains 10 minerals and pigments, including white ginseng polysaccharides to help with brightening.
NEWS
June 3, 2013 | By Mary MacVean
As if reducing the threat of skin cancer was not enough, scientists report that they have shown using sunscreen daily can slow the signs of aging skin -- even into middle age. Skin ages as people age, obviously. The sun is a major culprit in the skin's deterioration. Signs include wrinkles, of course, but also deterioration in texture and an increase in visible blood vessels. Scientists from Queensland Institute of Medical Research and other institutions divided 903 Australians 55 years old and younger into groups who used sunscreen with an SPF of at least 15 daily -- on face, neck, arms and hands -- and those who did so at their own discretion.
IMAGE
July 15, 2012 | By Kavita Daswani
Which BB cream is right for you? Here is a sampling of some products on the market or soon to be. Garnier Miracle Skin Perfector BB cream has vitamin C, tinted minerals and hyaluronic acid and comes in light-medium and medium-dark. It costs $12.99 at mass market retailers. Sulwhasoo Snowise brightening cream is originally from S. Korea and launched in the U.S. this year. It contains 10 minerals and pigments, including white ginseng polysaccharides to help with brightening.
HEALTH
June 30, 2012
The effectiveness standard most of us associate with sunscreens - the SPF, or sun protection factor - measures only how well they block UVB rays. That's because scientists used to believe UVB rays acted alone in causing skin cancer. UVB rays cause sunburn. So to measure how well a sunscreen blocks UVB rays, testers actually observe a group of people wearing the screen and a group not wearing it and time how long they can be in the sun before they start to turn red. The SPF rating is the ratio of the first group's average time compared with the second group's.
NEWS
June 29, 2012 | By Mary MacVean
With the constant drumbeat of reminders to put sunscreen on your skin, it might be confusing to consider what to do about that especially vulnerable skin of an infant. The U.S. Food and Drug Administrationrecommends that, generally, babies younger than 6 months old should not have sunscreen put on their skin. "The best approach is to keep infants under 6 months out of the sun, and to avoid exposure to the sun in the hours between 10 a.m. and 2 p.m., when ultraviolet (UV)
IMAGE
June 24, 2012 | By Alene Dawson, Special to the Los Angeles Times
Looking beautiful isn't the goal, but it's often a natural byproduct of the discipline, tenacity and good health required to be an Olympic champion. The beauty and fashion industries have taken note, sponsoring athletes, naming them brand ambassadors and featuring them on magazine covers, as Vogue did this month with a picture of tennis star Sabrina Williams and soccer goalie Hope Solo arm in arm with swimmer Ryan Lochte, all dressed in swimsuits and running on a sandy beach. Now that it is officially summer, we turned to some California Olympians for their thoughts on how to beat the heat and humidity that are intrinsic to their sports.
IMAGE
May 27, 2012 | By Susan Carpenter, Los Angeles Times
The beginning of summer always seems to be accompanied by an onslaught of sunscreens. The market is crowded with lotions and sprays, powders and lip balms, and, increasingly, multi-tasking products with inventive application methods that are touted for their ability to do more than just block the UVA and UVB rays that lead to sunburns, skin cancer and premature aging of the skin. Indeed, many of the season's new sun care products were designed to marry broad-spectrum sun protection with anti-aging compounds, moisturizers, makeup - even self tanners.
MAGAZINE
June 18, 1989 | PADDY CALISTRO
POSITIVE THINKERS say that America's passion for the suntan is fading. Yet last year, sales of sun-care products were at a record $500 million, with most of the dollars going to preparations that allow for a suntan. Despite the National Institutes of Health's adamant "no tan is a safe tan" message, millions of Americans are still convinced that bronzed is beautiful. Since most sunscreens only filter out the sunburn-producing ultraviolet-B rays, it is still possible to get a suntan via ultraviolet-A, infrared and other rays generated by the sun. But, according to dermatologist Madhu Pathak, chairman of the Skin Cancer Foundation's photobiology committee, "Fair-skinned people cannot stimulate a tan without damaging their skin cells first."
MAGAZINE
April 16, 1989 | PADDY CALISTRO
ALTHOUGH SKIN-CARE and medical experts continue to urge the public to wear products with a sun-protection factor (SPF) of at least 15, choosing the right protection is becoming increasingly difficult and, in some ways, downright frightening. Last month, news agencies reported that some sunscreen products containing Padimate O were contaminated with the nitrosamine N-methyl-N-nitroso-p-aminobenzoic acid octyl ester (known as NPABAO). Other nitrosamines have been found in cigarette smoke, automotive exhaust and even in some foods.
IMAGE
July 24, 2011 | By Alexandra Drosu, Special to the Los Angeles Times
As summer heats up, we've learned to slather SPF 15 or higher all over our bodies and faces in an effort to prevent sun damage and skin cancer. We've also been told to recite our ABCs when checking for unusual moles: asymmetry, border irregularity and uneven color. Unfortunately, our scalps are often neglected. Sunscreen is transparent on skin, but who wants to go to work with greasy roots? How many people wear a hat during their lunch break? And who can see a mole on top of her own head?
NEWS
June 15, 2011 | By Thomas H. Maugh II, Los Angeles Times
The Food and Drug Administration issued new guidelines Tuesday for sunscreen labeling that will give consumers better information about the products' effectiveness and that will, for the first time, allow the bottles, tubes and sprays to say that sunscreens protect against skin cancer and early skin aging. The agency has been considering such regulations since 1978 and released some proposed rules in 2007, but subsequently concluded that the labeling system under consideration would be too confusing for consumers.
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