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September 3, 1991 | From Associated Press
The Soviet upheaval has been all too real for designers of the new computer game Crisis in the Kremlin--events they programmed into their game months ago have played out before their eyes on television. "The game was in the testing mode while the crisis broke out," Gilman Louie, chief executive of California game maker Sphere Inc., said last week. "We're looking at the game and watching CNN at the same time. It's a little bit scary."
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BUSINESS
September 24, 1992 | JONATHAN WEBER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
When computer entrepreneur Gilman Louie awoke one day last fall to the news that media baron Robert Maxwell had vanished from his yacht, he knew he'd be in for some interesting times. But Louie, whose up-and-coming computer game company, Sphere Inc., was 89% owned by Maxwell, never imagined the surreal odyssey that would follow, involving shadowy Lichtenstein trusts, desperate Maxwell family members, determined bankruptcy investigators and destitute pensioners.
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BUSINESS
September 24, 1992 | JONATHAN WEBER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
When computer entrepreneur Gilman Louie awoke one day last fall to the news that media baron Robert Maxwell had vanished from his yacht, he knew he'd be in for some interesting times. But Louie, whose up-and-coming computer game company, Sphere Inc., was 89% owned by Maxwell, never imagined the surreal odyssey that would follow, involving shadowy Lichtenstein trusts, desperate Maxwell family members, determined bankruptcy investigators and destitute pensioners.
BUSINESS
September 3, 1991 | From Associated Press
The Soviet upheaval has been all too real for designers of the new computer game Crisis in the Kremlin--events they programmed into their game months ago have played out before their eyes on television. "The game was in the testing mode while the crisis broke out," Gilman Louie, chief executive of California game maker Sphere Inc., said last week. "We're looking at the game and watching CNN at the same time. It's a little bit scary."
BUSINESS
September 5, 2003 | From Bloomberg News
Twinlab Corp., a maker of vitamins and nutritional supplements, filed for bankruptcy protection after a drop in sales -- partly the result of its decision to stop selling weight-loss products containing ephedra. Twinlab listed $91.5 million in assets and $116.5 million in debt in the Chapter 11 filing. The company, based in Hauppauge, N.Y., also agreed to sell most of its assets to Grand Rapids, Mich.-based IdeaSphere Inc. for $65 million cash plus the assumption of about $3.
BUSINESS
July 2, 2005 | Claire Hoffman, Times Staff Writer
San Diego-based Metabolife International Inc., once a leading seller of herbal weight-control products, filed for bankruptcy protection Friday, citing the burden of hundreds of lawsuits filed by users of its products containing ephedra, a now-banned dietary supplement. Ephedra is an amphetamine-like herbal stimulant linked to dozens of heart attacks and 155 deaths -- including the 2003 death of Steve Bechler, a pitching prospect for the Baltimore Orioles.
BUSINESS
November 18, 2010 | By Tiffany Hsu, Los Angeles Times
Besides beautiful beaches, Disneyland and the original "Real Housewives" TV show, Orange County might have a new claim to fame. The fastest-growing segment of the county's economy is now the clean-tech market, according to government and industry officials. Hundreds of green companies are settling in the area, long known for its real estate development and medical device industry. The number of clean-tech jobs in the county, currently around 20,000, is growing about 5% each year, according to the Orange County Business Council.
BUSINESS
June 27, 1996 | MICHELLE V. RAFTER, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
When the McKinley Group, publisher of a World Wide Web directory called Magellan, announced plans to acquire Novo Media Group last month, the company marked the occasion with a lavish party, where guests sipped champagne and nibbled smoked salmon at a posh waterside restaurant. Suddenly, the party's over.
BUSINESS
May 25, 1992 | LESLIE HELM, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A year ago, Nintendo was the virtually unchallenged king of the $3.5-billion American video game business. And the Kyoto-based firm ruled its market with an iron fist: demanding high licensing fees, restricting the number of software companies allowed to develop games for Nintendo machines and barring them from developing software for rivals. Its actions sparked numerous lawsuits from retailers and game developers, who charged unfair trade practices. Now the kingdom of Nintendo is under attack.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 18, 1992 | BUDDY SEIGAL, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
For Jeff Gaulton, there has been a strange sense that he's been there before. "You know, I closed the venue the other night for the first time since I'd left, and it was a weird feeling," he said. Throughout much of the 1980s, Gaulton was the talent buyer who made the now-defunct Bacchanal into arguably San Diego's premier musical showcase club for national acts. And now, he is back in that room again.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 23, 2005 | Robert Salladay and Dan Morain, Times Staff Writers
Gov. Arnold Schwarzenegger ended his $8-million contract with a muscle magazine publisher last week. But his deep emotional, political and business ties to bodybuilding -- and to the supplement industry that feeds it -- won't be so easily severed. Since becoming governor, Schwarzenegger has remained closely involved with the bodybuilding world and with the supplement companies whose products promise such things as ripped muscles, "thermonuclear" energy and better sex.
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