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Sphinx Of City Hall

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MAGAZINE
February 23, 1992
The critique of Mayor Bradley's long tenure should have been titled "Teflon Tom Plows On." LEO RENE CARRILLO San Bernardino
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MAGAZINE
February 23, 1992
Glenn Bunting's "The Sphinx of City Hall" (Jan. 19) reminded me of some of the reasons I moved out of Los Angeles eight years ago. While the nation's second-largest city withers on the economic vine, chokes on traffic and smog, puts up with renegade cops and allows moronic punks to roam the streets with automatic weapons, Mayor Tom Bradley busies himself hoarding socks, riding in as many parades as possible, enriching himself and his cronies with...
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NEWS
April 6, 1993 | MARC LACEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Fresh from a two-week trip to Europe, Los Angeles Mayor Tom Bradley on Monday strongly denied that the excursion was a last-minute pleasure jaunt at public expense, and said his stops in London, Paris, Frankfurt and Milan were an essential part of restoring the city's battered post-riot reputation. "I'm a seven-day-a-week mayor," Bradley said during a City Hall news conference. "Most of those days are 15 hours a day, rarely taking a vacation.
NEWS
June 27, 1993 | JAMES RAINEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
For two decades, Tom Bradley has stood at the center of Los Angeles' civic stage, his name almost synonymous with the sprawling metropolis he has served. Now 75, Bradley seems to have changed little through the years. He still cuts an imposing figure, and his understated manner has not wavered, giving him a certain timeless quality. Although many have found this comforting, others say it has only heightened the contrast between the man and his city.
NEWS
September 30, 1998 | JEAN MERL and BILL BOYARSKY, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Tom Bradley, the slaves' grandson whose historic 1973 election as Los Angeles' first black mayor launched an unprecedented 20-year tenure as head of a roiling, fast-growing city, died Tuesday. He was 80. The man whose initiatives shaped modern Los Angeles had virtually disappeared from public life since a stroke in 1996 left him unable to speak clearly. He was pronounced dead at 9 a.m.
MAGAZINE
January 19, 1992 | Glenn F. Bunting, Glenn F. Bunting, who covered the Bradley Administration for the past four years for The Times , is now a Washington correspondent for the paper
It is a steamy 90 degrees in November. As darkness falls on the Hollywood Walk of Fame, passersby gawk at a street person wrapped in a winter coat and wool hat. He is dancing along the neon-lit boulevard to the pulsating sound of a boombox perched atop his shoulder, unaware that he is about to cross paths with the leading man of Los Angeles. * Impeccably dressed in a dark blue suit, a striking 6-foot, 4-inch figure glides toward his chauffeured Lincoln Town Car.
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