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Sphinx Statue

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NEWS
October 23, 1991 | LEE DYE, TIMES SCIENCE WRITER
New evidence that Egypt's Great Sphinx may be twice as old as had been thought has triggered a fierce argument between geologists who say it must be older and archeologists who say such a conclusion contradicts everything they know about ancient Egypt. Geologists who presented their results at the Geological Society of America convention here Tuesday said that weathering patterns on the monument are characteristic of a period far older than had been believed.
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NEWS
November 13, 1991 | KIM MURPHY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
When Egyptologist Howard Carter chipped a small hole into the wall guarding the inner chamber of the tomb of the young Pharaoh Tutankhamen, he poked his head in for a first look. Could he see anything? his sponsor, standing behind him, wanted to know. "Yes," Carter replied. "Wonderful things." "As my eyes grew accustomed to the light," he wrote later, "details of the room within emerged slowly from the mist, strange animals, statues and gold--everywhere the glint of gold."
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 4, 1990 | THOMAS H. MAUGH II, TIMES SCIENCE WRITER
The Sphinx and the Great Pyramids on the Giza Plateau across the Nile River from Cairo are among the oldest monuments known to humans, enduring and mysterious edifices that symbolize our links to the remotest civilization. For 4,600 years, the great stone structures have suffered the ravages of weather, the assaults of foreign soldiers, the depredations of tourists and the insidious attack of air pollutants, slowly losing bits and pieces of their unique identities.
NEWS
October 23, 1991 | LEE DYE, TIMES SCIENCE WRITER
New evidence that Egypt's Great Sphinx may be twice as old as had been thought has triggered a fierce argument between geologists who say it must be older and archeologists who say such a conclusion contradicts everything they know about ancient Egypt. Geologists who presented their results at the Geological Society of America convention here Tuesday said that weathering patterns on the monument are characteristic of a period far older than had been believed.
NEWS
November 13, 1991 | KIM MURPHY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
When Egyptologist Howard Carter chipped a small hole into the wall guarding the inner chamber of the tomb of the young Pharaoh Tutankhamen, he poked his head in for a first look. Could he see anything? his sponsor, standing behind him, wanted to know. "Yes," Carter replied. "Wonderful things." "As my eyes grew accustomed to the light," he wrote later, "details of the room within emerged slowly from the mist, strange animals, statues and gold--everywhere the glint of gold."
ENTERTAINMENT
May 16, 1990 | KIM MURPHY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
After 4,600 years of mystery, the chief riddle about the Sphinx is what went wrong with it. Crumbling, in some places collapsing, sand-swept and shrouded in scaffolding, the majestic half-man, half-lion that crouches inscrutably at the entrance to the historic Pyramids plateau is dying, and no one has quite been able to say why. Some blame ground vibrations or exhaust fumes from the tour buses that lumber past it each day.
NEWS
January 15, 1996 | JESSE KATZ, TIMES STAFF WRITER
By burying 10 big-finned Cadillacs nose down near old Route 66 at the precise angle of Egypt's Great Pyramid, iconoclastic oil-and-gas heir Stanley Marsh 3 put this drab Panhandle town on the map of Americana. Cadillac Ranch--memorialized in a Bruce Springsteen song, saluted in Charles Kuralt's "On the Road" and imitated by Los Angeles' Hard Rock Cafe--has become, in two decades, one of the most recognizable pop-art images of the 20th century.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 4, 1990 | THOMAS H. MAUGH II, TIMES SCIENCE WRITER
The Sphinx and the Great Pyramids on the Giza Plateau across the Nile River from Cairo are among the oldest monuments known to humans, enduring and mysterious edifices that symbolize our links to the remotest civilization. For 4,600 years, the great stone structures have suffered the ravages of weather, the assaults of foreign soldiers, the depredations of tourists and the insidious attack of air pollutants, slowly losing bits and pieces of their unique identities.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 16, 1990 | KIM MURPHY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
After 4,600 years of mystery, the chief riddle about the Sphinx is what went wrong with it. Crumbling, in some places collapsing, sand-swept and shrouded in scaffolding, the majestic half-man, half-lion that crouches inscrutably at the entrance to the historic Pyramids plateau is dying, and no one has quite been able to say why. Some blame ground vibrations or exhaust fumes from the tour buses that lumber past it each day.
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