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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 16, 1996 | JULIE YAMAMOTO, ASSOCIATED PRESS
With the lightest of light touches, entomologist Steve Kutcher picks up a newly hatched monarch butterfly by its wings and sets it on his kitchen table to feed on the sugary juice of a watermelon. It's a typical morning for a guy who walks past his neighbors' prize rose beds to look at the spiders or checks his house's electric meter to see if a live chrysalis is still hanging there.
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SCIENCE
June 18, 2013 | By Brad Balukjian
Cool things are found in caves: stalagmites, Christian Bale , Goonies and now a new species of assassin bug that snipes spiders, according to a new study . The labyrinth bug, named for its cave habitat ( and not the David Bowie movie ), was formally described last week in the journal Zootaxa. These spindly killers use their spiny front legs to seize small insects and other prey, and then pierce their catch with a sword-like snout in order to suck up its juices.   The new species ( Phasmatocoris labyrinthicus )
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NEWS
July 23, 2000 | TIM SULLIVAN, ASSOCIATED PRESS
Asked what he misses most, Jean-Guy Bongo stares at the kerosene lamp that lights his home, perched over a silent expanse of the Ruki River and hemmed in by equatorial jungle. "Mail," the genial regional administrator says finally. "We haven't had any for 20 years. Maybe 15 years. I can't remember." This used to be someplace. But not anymore. Ingende, like so many other Congolese towns ravaged by decades of government neglect and corruption, has returned to the wilderness.
SCIENCE
January 29, 2013 | By Joseph Serna
Scientists have found a new way to study spider webs that literally shines a light on arachnid technology like never before. Using light-scattering technology previously used for studying proteins, collagens and muscle fibers, researchers at Arizona State University measured the strength, elasticity and stiffness of spider webs. Scientists hope what they learn can help them develop new technologies for everyday life. Researchers collected silk from a garden spider, western black widow, orb-weaver spider and green lynx spider.
SCIENCE
June 18, 2013 | By Brad Balukjian
Cool things are found in caves: stalagmites, Christian Bale , Goonies and now a new species of assassin bug that snipes spiders, according to a new study . The labyrinth bug, named for its cave habitat ( and not the David Bowie movie ), was formally described last week in the journal Zootaxa. These spindly killers use their spiny front legs to seize small insects and other prey, and then pierce their catch with a sword-like snout in order to suck up its juices.   The new species ( Phasmatocoris labyrinthicus )
SPORTS
March 16, 1989 | From Associated Press
Ken Atkinson scored a career-high 24 points, getting 18 from three-point range, and Richmond's basketball team gunned down Temple, 70-56, in a first-round game of the National Invitation Tournament at Richmond, Va. Atkinson, who made six of nine three-point shots, scored seven points as the Spiders (21-9) closed the first half with a 14-7 run to take a 35-25 lead. Temple (18-12) fell behind, 44-27, early in the second half but scored 11 straight points to get back into the game momentarily.
SCIENCE
January 29, 2013 | By Joseph Serna
Scientists have found a new way to study spider webs that literally shines a light on arachnid technology like never before. Using light-scattering technology previously used for studying proteins, collagens and muscle fibers, researchers at Arizona State University measured the strength, elasticity and stiffness of spider webs. Scientists hope what they learn can help them develop new technologies for everyday life. Researchers collected silk from a garden spider, western black widow, orb-weaver spider and green lynx spider.
NEWS
November 10, 1988 | IVARS PETERSON, Washington Post and Ivars Peterson, an editor of Science News, is the author of "The Mathematical Tourist" (W.H. Freeman), from which this article is adapted.
The structures designed by architect Frei Otto are graceful and airy as spider webs. Translucent membranes, supported by steel-wire nets, reach out from tall masts. Anchors tie the fringes to the ground. But these ethereal forms are also anchored in practical reality. Otto, working at the Institute for Lightweight Structures in Stuttgart, West Germany, wanted to use as little construction material as possible for enclosures that are easily built, dismantled and moved.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 30, 1987 | ANN MARIE CUNNINGHAM, Cunningham is writer on the arts based in New York
"I don't photograph well," said Argentine novelist Manuel Puig in fluent English. "I always end up looking . . ." and he bugs and rolls his large, dark eyes, imitating a horrific character out of a 1930s B movie. Puig loves those movies, and the plots of two of them, "The Cat People" and "I Walked With a Zombie," form part of his best-known novel, "Kiss of the Spider Woman."
ENTERTAINMENT
July 5, 2012 | By Amy Kaufman
"The Amazing Spider-Man"continues to weave an enticing web at the box office as the superhero has ensnared $59.2 million after two days in theaters. Sony Pictures is anticipating that its 3-D movie will have taken in around $130 million by Sunday, on the low end of what most in Hollywood had originally predicted for the movie's six-day debut. Some industry experts believe the superhero flick could gross as much as $150 million by weekend's end, which would be a good start for a film that cost $230 million to produce "Spider-Man,"starring Andrew Garfield, has already captured more than $50.2 million in a limited number of foreign markets and is expected to ultimately make most of its money overseas.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 5, 2012 | By Amy Kaufman
"The Amazing Spider-Man"continues to weave an enticing web at the box office as the superhero has ensnared $59.2 million after two days in theaters. Sony Pictures is anticipating that its 3-D movie will have taken in around $130 million by Sunday, on the low end of what most in Hollywood had originally predicted for the movie's six-day debut. Some industry experts believe the superhero flick could gross as much as $150 million by weekend's end, which would be a good start for a film that cost $230 million to produce "Spider-Man,"starring Andrew Garfield, has already captured more than $50.2 million in a limited number of foreign markets and is expected to ultimately make most of its money overseas.
OPINION
September 12, 2010 | By Molly Selvin
I'm not a helicopter parent, hovering over my children — I swear. It's just that the spider webs that blossom in our garden this time of year always make me a bit weepy. We did the soggy-Kleenex college drop-off years ago, and since then, our now-adult children have ping-ponged between the Bay Area and Los Angeles. They've each graduated or started jobs up there, or headed off to faraway adventures. Yes, the house felt achingly empty after my husband and I deposited first our son, and then our daughter, for their freshman years.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 2, 2004 | Diane Haithman Times Staff Writer, Times Staff Writer
Swaggering up 4th Street near Spring is an angry young man in a brightly striped sweater, offering his unfavorable performance review of Police Chief "Billy Bratton" to the air. Walking briskly on that same street are a uniformed police officer and a man in crisp business attire, discussing "reality television." Others include a man begging for change, two laughing women unloading athletic shoe boxes from a Volkswagen and a weary crowd waiting for the bus. This eclectic downtown L.A.
NEWS
July 23, 2000 | TIM SULLIVAN, ASSOCIATED PRESS
Asked what he misses most, Jean-Guy Bongo stares at the kerosene lamp that lights his home, perched over a silent expanse of the Ruki River and hemmed in by equatorial jungle. "Mail," the genial regional administrator says finally. "We haven't had any for 20 years. Maybe 15 years. I can't remember." This used to be someplace. But not anymore. Ingende, like so many other Congolese towns ravaged by decades of government neglect and corruption, has returned to the wilderness.
BOOKS
November 15, 1998 | MELVIN JULES BUKIET, Melvin Jules Bukiet is the author of the novel "After" and the forthcoming "Signs and Wonders." He teaches at Sarah Lawrence College
At Gundel's, arguably the best restaurant in Eastern Europe, one of the specialties of the house is simply called "His Majesty's Favorite Soup" as if there's no need to explain what that soup contains. Visiting Budapest a few months ago, ignorant, curious and hungry but wary, I asked about the ingredients and bore the waiter's disdain.
NEWS
December 1, 1996 | KAREN TESTA, ASSOCIATED PRESS
Forget predictions of a mild winter by the National Weather Service and The Old Farmer's Almanac. Irene Thomas has stocked up on firewood because the telltale signs she's been watching for most of her 84 years indicate this winter will be a doozy. The only woolly worm she's seen was black as night. The squirrels are bustling about her yard at a frenetic pace. And the first snow of the season came on Oct. 22.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 9, 1995 | From Times staff and wire reports
The delicate yet tough strands of silk spun by ordinary spiders may provide surgeons with a new material for stitching up wounds, according to a researcher at the University of Wyoming. "Spider silk is very resistant to climate changes, bacteria, enzymes and fungal growth," M. Delwar Hussain told a meeting of the American Assn. of Pharmaceutical Scientists. "We think it could be a good substitute for sutures in tendon and ligament wounds, or with artificial prostheses." Hussain reported that spider silk was not toxic to the cells of mice and that it proved stable and strong when inserted under the skin and inside muscle.
OPINION
September 12, 2010 | By Molly Selvin
I'm not a helicopter parent, hovering over my children — I swear. It's just that the spider webs that blossom in our garden this time of year always make me a bit weepy. We did the soggy-Kleenex college drop-off years ago, and since then, our now-adult children have ping-ponged between the Bay Area and Los Angeles. They've each graduated or started jobs up there, or headed off to faraway adventures. Yes, the house felt achingly empty after my husband and I deposited first our son, and then our daughter, for their freshman years.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 16, 1996 | JULIE YAMAMOTO, ASSOCIATED PRESS
With the lightest of light touches, entomologist Steve Kutcher picks up a newly hatched monarch butterfly by its wings and sets it on his kitchen table to feed on the sugary juice of a watermelon. It's a typical morning for a guy who walks past his neighbors' prize rose beds to look at the spiders or checks his house's electric meter to see if a live chrysalis is still hanging there.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 13, 1995 | From Times staff and wire reports
The delicate yet tough strands of silk spun by ordinary spiders may provide surgeons with a new material for stitching up wounds, according to a researcher at the University of Wyoming. "Spider silk is very resistant to climate changes, bacteria, enzymes and fungal growth," M. Delwar Hussain told a meeting of the American Assn. of Pharmaceutical Scientists. "We think it could be a good substitute for sutures in tendon and ligament wounds, or with artificial prostheses."
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