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November 12, 1990 | ROBERT KOEHLER, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
It didn't matter that Lisa Mayo was a classically trained singer.Or that she had studied with the redoubtable Uta Hagen. Or that her sister, Muriel Miguel, helped found the Open Theatre. None of that mattered when it came to casting time. Like almost all nonwhite actors--even with the trend of non-traditional casting--the sisters were inevitably slotted into exotic roles. "The New York ethnic," as Mayo terms it.
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ENTERTAINMENT
November 12, 1990 | ROBERT KOEHLER, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
It didn't matter that Lisa Mayo was a classically trained singer.Or that she had studied with the redoubtable Uta Hagen. Or that her sister, Muriel Miguel, helped found the Open Theatre. None of that mattered when it came to casting time. Like almost all nonwhite actors--even with the trend of non-traditional casting--the sisters were inevitably slotted into exotic roles. "The New York ethnic," as Mayo terms it.
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ENTERTAINMENT
November 4, 1990 | JANICE ARKATOV
November marks the return of some old theatrical favorites, a spate of new works, solos, one-acts, poetry, musicals, traveling productions and pre-holiday cheer. Today: The Audrey Skirball-Kenis Theatre presents a free concert reading of Dan Duling's "Hard Road Home" at UCLA's Little Theatre. John Jackson, O-Lan Jones and Ebbe Roe Smith co-star in this dark comedy about adultery in Modesto, Cal.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 24, 2008 | Jan Breslauer, Special to The Times
When "Vanities" opened off-Broadway in 1976, no one thought of it as feminist theater. But in its day, the play was groundbreaking. Jack Heifner's story about three Texas cheerleaders and how they grew apart was one of the first long-running, widely produced plays of the 1970s to feature an all-female cast. "It was very controversial at the time," says the playwright, sitting in the library of the Pasadena Playhouse, during a break from rehearsals for the musical version of his best-known work.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 5, 1995 | Brian Wescott, Brian Wescott is an Athabascan from Alaska currently living in Malibu. His doctoral dissertation from Yale University is a history of Native Americans in show business, completed in 1993. He now does free-lance film production.
'Black Elk Speaks" at the Mark Taper Forum is the biggest production about Native Americans to appear in Los Angeles in decades. The play, on tour from the Denver Center Theatre, gives Native Americans and non-Native Americans alike an occasion to rub elbows and build community. It also has prompted discussions of the history and future of such drama here, in the city with the largest urban Native American population in the country.
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