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ENTERTAINMENT
June 30, 2010
Spies of the Balkans A Novel Alan Furst Random House: 288 pp., $26
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OPINION
April 5, 2014
Re "Jonathan Pollard's fate," Editorial, April 2 You argue that releasing Jonathan Pollard, the former intelligence worker who passed along secret information to Israel and was sentenced to life in prison, is a poor decision because it would set an "unseemly precedent. " You go on to argue that releasing Pollard would not have any real impact on Israeli-Palestinian peace talks. Both claims fail to see the urgency of the situation. Releasing Pollard would actually provide concrete incentives to Israel's very right-wing government by rewarding it for concessions.
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WORLD
July 24, 2010
Russia's Prime Minister Vladimir Putin said on Saturday he had met with Russian spies swapped in an exchange with the United States earlier this month, and promised them a bright future in Russia. "I have no doubts they will have interesting, bright lives," Putin, a former KGB agent, told reporters during a working visit to Ukraine. Ten people pleaded guilty this month to being agents for Russia while living undercover in the United States in one of the biggest spy scandals since the Cold War. They were deported to Russia, which in turn agreed to release four people imprisoned for suspected contact with Western intelligence agencies.
NATIONAL
March 31, 2014 | By Ken Dilanian, This article has been corrected. See the note at the bottom for details
FT. MEADE, Md. - In nearly nine years as head of the nation's largest intelligence agency, Gen. Keith Alexander presided over a vast expansion of digital spying, acquiring information in a volume his predecessors would have found unimaginable. In Iraq, for example, the National Security Agency went from intercepting only about half of enemy signals and taking hours to process them to being able to collect, sort and make available details of every Iraqi insurgent email, text message and phone-location signal in real time, said John "Chris" Inglis, who recently retired as the NSA's top civilian.
NEWS
March 3, 2011 | By Terry Gardner, Special to the Los Angeles Times
If your knowledge of spies and terrorists is limited to the names of Benedict Arnold, Timothy McVeigh and Osama bin Laden, visit Philadelphia this spring and learn about anarchists and traitors that have haunted America since its birth. On March 4, “ Spies, Traitors & Saboteurs: Fear and Freedom in America ” opens in the National Constitution Center ’s new exhibition space in the Center’s lower level. Created by the International Spy Museum in Washington, the exhibition combines artifacts, multimedia elements and interactive exhibits to reveal tales of espionage, treason and deception in the U.S. from 1776 to today.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 6, 2014 | By Alan Eyerly
The brutal slaying of a KGB spy couple and their teenage daughter sends a shockwave through the Soviet espionage network and alarms the public in Episode 2 (“Cardinal”) of “The Americans,” the Cold War drama on FX. Investigators have yet to discover the true identities of the dead parents, Emmett (Jeremy Davidson) and Leanne (Natalie Gold). For now they're regarded as typical Virginia residents tragically gunned down in their hotel room. Russian spies Elizabeth (Keri Russell)
ENTERTAINMENT
December 18, 2012 | By Sharon Mizota
Walking into Mark Swope's exhibition of photographs at Craig Krull Gallery is to be greeted by a surprisingly expressive juniper. Like an onion left too long in the produce bin, it is rounded and full at the base, erupting into a burst of tempestuous, flame-like tendrils up top. This exuberant flourish seems wholly out of proportion with the modest stucco home behind it, creating an appealing tension between the wild and the mundane. In progress for about a decade, Swope's series “Foliage” provides a humorous, sometimes startling glimpse into the hidden life of domestic shrubbery.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 23, 2010
Alan Furst discusses 'Spies of the Balkans' with film and TV writer Dick Clement When: 7:30 p.m. Thursday Where: The Writer's Guild Theatre, 135 South Doheny Drive, Beverly Hills. Tickets: The event is hosted by Los Angeles literary group Writers Bloc and tickets are available for $20 from http://www.writersblocpresents.com.
NEWS
January 28, 1993 | Associated Press
Russia's Security Ministry, the successor to the KGB, admitted Wednesday that the country's spies are defecting to the West in growing numbers.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 3, 2013 | By Robert Lloyd, Los Angeles Times Television Critic
It's a big week on BBC America for fans of "Doctor Who. " Saturday brought the return of the series itself and Wednesday sees David Tennant, its no-longer-employed-there 10th Doctor, starring in the prewar romantic thriller "Spies of Warsaw. " Burn Gorman of the "Who" spinoff "Torchwood" is in it, too, for incidental frisson. Adapted by Dick Clement and Ian La Frenais from Alan Furst's 2008 novel of nearly the same name, it features Tennant as Jean-Francois Mercier - you can tell he's French by the English accent - a World War I hero and aristocrat diplomatically posted to Poland but engaged in a variety of undercover activities.
OPINION
March 27, 2014
Re “Obama plan for NSA is widely praised, March 26 Suppose the neighbor on your right had been opening your mail since 2009 and he told you yesterday that he would only look at some of your mail from now on. Would you agree with your neighbor on the left who said he was a wonderful neighbor? No? Then why is President Obama being lauded for cutting back on the rules he established for the NSA? Ermanno Signorelli Mar Vista More letters to the editor ...  
NATIONAL
March 19, 2014 | By Mark Z. Barabak
BERKELEY - Sen. Rand Paul, a leading critic of the government's domestic spying program, came to the birthplace of the free-speech movement Wednesday to deliver a searing indictment of the intelligence community and call for a sweeping congressional investigation of its activities. Addressing a mostly student audience just off the UC Berkeley campus, the Kentucky Republican suggested the nation's surveillance agencies - "drunk with power" - were running roughshod over the Constitution by prying into the most intimate details of people's lives.
OPINION
March 14, 2014
Re "CIA denies Senate spying claim," March 12 Anyone who fails to appreciate the supreme irony of Sen. Dianne Feinstein's (D-Calif.) righteous indignation over the CIA's alleged spying on and undermining of the Senate Intelligence Committee (of which Feinstein is chair) has not been paying attention. For years, she has been one of the intelligence community's most steadfast champions, deflecting criticism of the surveillance state, attacking whistle-blowers and justifying nearly every abuse.
NATIONAL
March 13, 2014 | By David Horsey
California Sen. Dianne Feinstein's accusation that the CIA has illegally spied on Congress has caused everyone from South Carolina's hawkish Republican Sen. Lindsey Graham to on-the-run whistle-blower Edward Snowden to weigh in. Feinstein, a Democrat, chairs the Senate Intelligence Committee. She claims there is evidence that the CIA conducted surveillance on committee staffers who were looking through classified documents related to the spy agency's interrogation and detention practices during the administration of President George W. Bush.
NEWS
March 11, 2014 | By Ken Dilanian
WASHINGTON -- Sen. Dianne Feinstein, the head of the Senate Intelligence Committee, and CIA Director John Brennan sparred Tuesday over the lawmaker's allegation that agency officials secretly had searched Senate computers, an act she said had undermined congressional intelligence oversight and may have violated the law. "I have grave concerns that the CIA search may well have violated the separation-of-powers principles,"  Feinstein said on...
NATIONAL
March 11, 2014 | By Ken Dilanian
WASHINGTON - A long-simmering dispute between the CIA and its Senate overseers erupted into public view Tuesday when the head of the Senate Intelligence Committee accused the agency of possible crimes and of attempting to intimidate committee staffers investigating the CIA's former use of waterboarding and other harsh interrogation techniques. Sen. Dianne Feinstein (D-Calif.), the committee chairwoman, said the CIA secretly searched computers used by Senate staffers and might have violated constitutional provisions on separation of powers and unreasonable searches, a federal law on computer fraud and abuse, and a presidential order that prohibits the CIA from domestic searches and surveillance.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 30, 2010 | By Tim Rutten, Los Angeles Times
The Cold War's abrupt conclusion seemed to take a good bit of the narrative wind out of the espionage genre's sails. Partly, that had to do with the way the conflict ended — only a handful of prescient and implacably anti-communist historians and intellectuals had foreseen that, once contained, the Soviet bloc simply would collapse under its own weight. Partly, it had to do with the loss of that forces-of-light versus forces-of-darkness dichotomy provided by the global struggle between Soviet-style Marxism and the Western democracies.
OPINION
December 13, 2004
Re "The Loud Fight Over Reporters' Silence," Commentary, Dec. 7: New York Times reporter Judith Miller claims: "This is all about the public -- the public's right to know." To know what? The names of our spies? Absurd! This is not about the public's right to know; it is about the Bush administration's power to destroy anyone who gets in its way -- in this case, Ambassador Joseph Wilson, whose wife was a CIA undercover operative. Justice should protect those who serve the public interest, not those who serve as conduits for the cynical abuse of power.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 6, 2014 | By Alan Eyerly
The brutal slaying of a KGB spy couple and their teenage daughter sends a shockwave through the Soviet espionage network and alarms the public in Episode 2 (“Cardinal”) of “The Americans,” the Cold War drama on FX. Investigators have yet to discover the true identities of the dead parents, Emmett (Jeremy Davidson) and Leanne (Natalie Gold). For now they're regarded as typical Virginia residents tragically gunned down in their hotel room. Russian spies Elizabeth (Keri Russell)
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