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ENTERTAINMENT
May 21, 1992 | ROBERT W. WELKOS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The behind-the-scenes sparring that has rocked Spike Lee's film "Malcolm X" intensified Wednesday when the noted director said that if he hadn't been financially rescued by several African-American celebrities he would have been forced to shut down post-production.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 3, 1992
To what degree Malcolm X, whether you loved or hated him, had a change of heart toward the end of his life regarding working with other people and other leaders remains a key matter of contention. But Spike Lee's film "Malcolm X" tells another truth in depicting brilliantly well those all-too-often times in the 1960s when circumstances swept events and lives beyond the control of mere people. When Margaret Mead said, "Never doubt that a small group of thoughtful, committed citizens can change the world; indeed, it's the only thing that ever does," she wasn't talking about Malcolm X. As one man, he alone left a legacy that is perhaps only beginning to ripple through our lives.
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ENTERTAINMENT
July 7, 1991
T imes staff writer Itabari Njeri's commentary on Spike Lee's film "Jungle Fever" ("Doing the Wrong Thing," June 23) has prompted an outpouring from readers, with responses supporting Lee outnumbering those supporting Njeri about 2 to 1. A sampling: Lee and 'Anglo-Bashing' In these dark days of Anglo-bashing, in which few see the racist overtones of declaring oneself a "person of color" (as if whites are translucent albinos with no...
ENTERTAINMENT
May 21, 1992 | ROBERT W. WELKOS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The behind-the-scenes sparring that has rocked Spike Lee's film "Malcolm X" intensified Wednesday when the noted director said that if he hadn't been financially rescued by several African-American celebrities he would have been forced to shut down post-production.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 3, 1992
To what degree Malcolm X, whether you loved or hated him, had a change of heart toward the end of his life regarding working with other people and other leaders remains a key matter of contention. But Spike Lee's film "Malcolm X" tells another truth in depicting brilliantly well those all-too-often times in the 1960s when circumstances swept events and lives beyond the control of mere people. When Margaret Mead said, "Never doubt that a small group of thoughtful, committed citizens can change the world; indeed, it's the only thing that ever does," she wasn't talking about Malcolm X. As one man, he alone left a legacy that is perhaps only beginning to ripple through our lives.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 7, 1991
T imes staff writer Itabari Njeri's commentary on Spike Lee's film "Jungle Fever" ("Doing the Wrong Thing," June 23) has prompted an outpouring from readers, with responses supporting Lee outnumbering those supporting Njeri about 2 to 1. A sampling: The Artist as Role Model Is it necessary for Njeri to inflict such savage commentary upon Lee? It is true that there are those who disagree with his approach and point of view. But there are also those who admire Lee as a cultural hero who has succeeded in a field that has been traditionally closed to blacks.
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