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ENTERTAINMENT
June 5, 2013 | By Ryan Faughnder
Spike TV wants to broaden its appeal, and its answer -- or maybe “manswer” -- is more original, gender-neutral shows. To that end, the network best known for its young male-oriented fare is bolstering its original programming staff, banking on reality series such as “Ink Master,” “Bar Rescue,” and “Tattoo Nightmares.” This also means less emphasis on the dude-centric programming. “The Original Series team's expansion reflects our ever-continuing goal to create distinctive, bold shows geared toward a more gender-balanced audience,” said Sharon Levy, executive vice president of original series at Spike TV.  “We are developing more original series than ever before.”  PHOTOS: Cable versus broadcast ratings The network promoted Chris Rantamaki, who helped develop Spike's highest-rated show “Ink Master,” to senior vice president.
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BUSINESS
April 3, 2014 | By Lauren Beale
Dave Navarro of Jane's Addiction fame has listed his Hollywood loft for sale at $949,000. The 1,570-square-foot, open-plan space features a crushed-vinyl entry, 15-foot ceilings, a stainless-steel and black-quartz kitchen, blackout curtains and views of the Capitol Records building and the Hollywood sign. Offered in the sale is Navarro's white vinyl upholstered platform bed, which was custom designed for the room by Heidi Toll. There is a black-and-red designer bathroom. The loft is in the Broadway Hollywood building, built in 1926.
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ENTERTAINMENT
June 2, 2010 | By T. L. Stanley, Special to the Los Angeles Times
If you're at all squeamish about seeing someone get cash staple-gunned to his privates or 4-foot-tall wrestlers mauling each other while beer-drinking bar patrons egg them on, you might not be the target for the Spike network's new late-night series, "Half Pint Brawlers." But if you're into "Jackass"-style stunts, choreographed grappling matches and pants-dropping spectacles, you may have just found your new appointment viewing. Spike, the testosterone-fueled home of "The Ultimate Fighter," "1,000 Ways to Die" and "Manswers," launches the six-episode show at 11 p.m. Wednesday.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 5, 2013 | By Patrick Kevin Day
OK, enough with the grainy footage, the first-person accounts and questionable evidence. Spike TV is looking to get to the bottom of this whole Bigfoot mystery once and for all with its next reality competition series, "10 Million Dollar Bigfoot Bounty. " Not surprisingly, the series, which premieres Jan. 10, hasn't attracted a whole lot of what you would call studious, academic types. Instead, you get a whole lot of angry, sexist rednecks yelling at each other in the woods. What better way to attract a notoriously camera-shy, quite probably mythical creature, than to have a bunch of people arguing in the woods?
ENTERTAINMENT
March 12, 2005 | From Associated Press
World Wrestling Entertainment is looking for a new television home. Cable's Spike TV, which has shown pro wrestling regularly on Monday and Saturday nights, said it has stopped negotiating with the WWE for an extension of a contract that ends in September. "WWE Raw" and "WWE Raw Zone" are regularly among the most popular programs on cable television, but a network executive speaking on condition of anonymity said wrestling was never as popular with advertisers as it was with audiences.
BUSINESS
July 9, 2003 | Thomas S. Mulligan, Times Staff Writer
After squabbling for weeks with Viacom Inc. over plans to rename its TNN cable network Spike TV, filmmaker Spike Lee said he looked forward to working with the entertainment giant. "I no longer believe that Viacom deliberately intended to trade on my name when naming Spike TV," Lee said in the statement, which was released as his lawyer, Johnnie L. Cochran Jr., and Viacom attorney David Boies finalized a settlement.
BUSINESS
June 4, 2003 | From Bloomberg News
Filmmaker Spike Lee has sued Viacom Inc. over its decision to rename its TNN cable-television network Spike TV to attract more male viewers. Lee said in a lawsuit filed in New York that he was "extremely upset" over the name Viacom chose to rechristen the network. He said he has no connection with it. Lee said in court papers that it is obvious that "Spike TV referred to Spike Lee." Viacom announced the name change April 15 in an attempt to build on an audience that's already about 65% male.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 1, 2009 | Susan Carpenter
I was several floors up in a burning high-rise, trapped with hundreds of other panicked co-workers who couldn't find an easy escape. The halls were filling with smoke, as were the stairwells, so I took the only obvious way out. I stepped into an elevator -- and plummeted to a fiery, premature death. Or so it was meant to seem. In truth, I was just acting. I was an extra on the set of an elaborate pyrotechnic simulation that makes up the escape-from-fire episode of a Spike TV show, "Surviving Disaster," that premieres tonight at 10. The latest high-octane infotainment program to hit the testosterone-fueled cable network, "Surviving Disaster" is half reality TV, half scripted narrative -- a program that takes advantage of the country's high anxiety and enthusiasm for preparedness while striving to live up to its name.
BUSINESS
July 8, 2003 | Claudia Eller, Times Staff Writer
And to think they might have been forced to call it Sumner TV. New York-based movie director Spike Lee settled his legal squabble late Monday with Viacom Inc. -- the media conglomerate run by Sumner Redstone -- over plans to rename its TNN Network "Spike TV." Confirmation of the settlement came shortly after a New York judge lifted his order barring Viacom from using the moniker Spike TV. Settlement terms were not disclosed. Both sides are expected to appear in court this morning.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 16, 2003 | Susan King, Times Staff Writer
James Brown may wail the anthem, and the 50%-plus of the population that doesn't carry the Y chromosome may agree: "It's a man's world." But according to the president of the "first" network for guys, the male sex has been underrepresented on television. Never mind the testosterone-driven programming on TBS and such sports networks as ESPN, Outdoor Life and the Golf Network. And let's not even get into all of those war documentaries that pop up on the History Channel, Discovery and A&E.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 18, 2013 | By Joe Flint
Veteran television executive Albie Hecht has been tapped to be the new executive vice president and general manager of the cable channel HLN. Part of the CNN empire, HLN has gone over a few makeovers over the last couple of years. Formerly known as Headline News, the channel, with its focus on crime, trials, and pop culture, is something of a hybrid of CNN and E! Its most well-known personalities are lawyer Nancy Grace and Dr. Drew Pinsky. Hecht's background is primarily in entertainment including long stints at Viacom's Nickelodeon and Spike TV. His hiring will likely be seen as a further sign that HLN will continue to distance itself from its hard-news roots.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 5, 2013 | By Ryan Faughnder
Spike TV wants to broaden its appeal, and its answer -- or maybe “manswer” -- is more original, gender-neutral shows. To that end, the network best known for its young male-oriented fare is bolstering its original programming staff, banking on reality series such as “Ink Master,” “Bar Rescue,” and “Tattoo Nightmares.” This also means less emphasis on the dude-centric programming. “The Original Series team's expansion reflects our ever-continuing goal to create distinctive, bold shows geared toward a more gender-balanced audience,” said Sharon Levy, executive vice president of original series at Spike TV.  “We are developing more original series than ever before.”  PHOTOS: Cable versus broadcast ratings The network promoted Chris Rantamaki, who helped develop Spike's highest-rated show “Ink Master,” to senior vice president.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 6, 2013 | By Patrick Kevin Day
"Cops" has been on Fox about as long as "The Simpsons," but while Matt Groening's animated hit is still going, the reality series that follows police officers on their daily rounds is moving to a new home. It'll debut on Spike TV in the fall. According to TV Guide , the series is making the leap from network to cable after Fox's continual postponing of the show in favor of sports programming spurred series executive producer John Langley to seek a change. The show's 26th season is expected to premiere on Spike in September with episodes filmed in California, Texas and Florida.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 15, 2012 | By Mary McNamara, Los Angeles Times Television Critic
Frankly, it sounded pretty stupid. For reasons unknown, electricity fails worldwide, sending humanity into a post-technological free-fall. Weeds grow in the Capitol (very "Logan's Run"), young women defend their families with bows and arrows (very "Hunger Games"), and no one seems to remember that people made ice cream and bullets long before electricity was harnessed as a personal power source. But NBC's "Revolution" surprised everyone; not only was it good, it was a hit. Big Concept shows are always a gamble; too often creators pick the wrong big concept - dinosaurs, say, or a remake of "V. " "Revolution," through insight or sheer luck, struck thematic gold, mining the vein running through our collective unconscious: Where once we feared corruption, we now fear collapse, a technological, social or political cataclysm that will Change Everything.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 22, 2012 | By Mary McNamara, Los Angeles Times Television Critic
In a welcome break from the traditionally saccharine holiday programming, ABC is airing "a version" of Spike Lee's documentary "Michael Jackson: Bad 25," which had its premiere at the Venice International Film Festival before having a short theatrical release. Lee trimmed almost an hour for the television version, but "Bad 25" is still something to be thankful for, a hypnotic homage to the performer's gift and, more important, his dedication. Wielding an impressive collection of behind-the-scenes clips as well as interviews with a disparate array of colleagues (including Martin Scorsese and Sheryl Crow)
ENTERTAINMENT
August 30, 2011 | By Jessica Gelt, Los Angeles Times
If you own a bar and your customers are having trouble distinguishing it from the strip club next door, you've got a bit of a PR problem on your hands. Such was the case with a joint named Angel's in Corona. Opened in 1992 by a former female wrestler named Renee Vicary, it was close to shutting down for good in this past spring. In fact, Angel's rated so high on the dive bar Richter scale that it was featured on a new Spike TV reality show called "Bar Rescue. " Jon Taffer, seasoned bar consultant and "Bar Rescue" host, spent five spring days transforming Angel's from a dingy sports bar into a classed-up whiskey den called Racks Billiards & Bourbon.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 13, 2010 | By Scott Collins
Twenty-five years ago, MTV was best known for music videos starring Michael Jackson and Madonna. These days, its reigning queen is not a recording star at all but rather Nicole "Snooki" Polizzi, the rowdy party girl from the reality series "Jersey Shore." So maybe it's not surprising that this week the 29-year-old network bowed to the inevitable and finally scraped the legend "Music Television" off its corporate logo. The change was a belated acknowledgment of what has been obvious for years: MTV has evolved into a reality channel that occasionally runs programs that have to do with music.
BUSINESS
June 13, 2003 | James Bates, Times Staff Writer
Spike Lee's still got name. At least temporarily. The movie director won a preliminary injunction Thursday in New York in his effort to prove that the people behind Spike TV did the wrong thing by using the name for its cable network geared for guys. Lee wants the name spiked because he believes the network is trying to capitalize on his celebrity. "You can't take the name Spike TV when you have a person like Spike Lee who is such an important part of television and film.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 2, 2010 | By T. L. Stanley, Special to the Los Angeles Times
If you're at all squeamish about seeing someone get cash staple-gunned to his privates or 4-foot-tall wrestlers mauling each other while beer-drinking bar patrons egg them on, you might not be the target for the Spike network's new late-night series, "Half Pint Brawlers." But if you're into "Jackass"-style stunts, choreographed grappling matches and pants-dropping spectacles, you may have just found your new appointment viewing. Spike, the testosterone-fueled home of "The Ultimate Fighter," "1,000 Ways to Die" and "Manswers," launches the six-episode show at 11 p.m. Wednesday.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 13, 2010 | By Scott Collins
Twenty-five years ago, MTV was best known for music videos starring Michael Jackson and Madonna. These days, its reigning queen is not a recording star at all but rather Nicole "Snooki" Polizzi, the rowdy party girl from the reality series "Jersey Shore." So maybe it's not surprising that this week the 29-year-old network bowed to the inevitable and finally scraped the legend "Music Television" off its corporate logo. The change was a belated acknowledgment of what has been obvious for years: MTV has evolved into a reality channel that occasionally runs programs that have to do with music.
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