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NATIONAL
July 19, 2012 | By Kim Murphy
SEATTLE--The vessel designated to act as a crucial oil spill containment system in Arctic waters has obtained Coast Guard  approval to meet less rigorous weather standards than originally proposed. But, less than two weeks before drilling off Alaska's northern coast is due to begin, a series of troubling construction delays have left the Arctic Challenger without federal certification . The certification issue is the most serious Shell must confront if it is to successfully launch a exploratory drilling program, the first in Arctic waters in two decades, in which it already has invested $4 billion.
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NATIONAL
February 27, 2013 | By Kim Murphy
SEATTLE - Plagued with problems with both its drilling rigs and its oil spill containment vessel, Shell Alaska announced Wednesday that it will not conduct offshore drilling operations in the Alaska Arctic this year. The decision to “pause” Arctic drilling during the upcoming ice-free months of summer will allow the company to repair and retool its troubled rigs and prepare for future operations in a program that has already cost the company nearly $5 billion. The company will continue to do offshore scientific research and conduct meetings with villagers across the North Slope in an attempt to keep the program moving and ready for resumption “at a later stage,” company spokesman Curtis Smith told the Los Angeles Times.
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NATIONAL
October 7, 2010 | By Kim Murphy, Los Angeles Times
With the BP oil well blowout in the Gulf of Mexico successfully contained, Shell Alaska announced Wednesday that it had filed an application to proceed with exploratory offshore drilling in the Beaufort Sea off Alaska. The Obama administration suspended all offshore operations in the remote, fragile Arctic seas this year after the BP spill, but Shell officials said they had prepared a more robust oil blowout containment plan and were ready to proceed next summer with a single well 17 miles off the North Slope.
NATIONAL
January 8, 2013 | By Kim Murphy
After a series of problems plagued the debut of offshore oil drilling in the U.S. Arctic, Interior Secretary Ken Salazar Tuesday ordered a high-level, expedited review of oil operations in Alaskan waters aimed at achieving “safe and responsible exploration for energy resources in the Arctic.” The review, scheduled to be completed over the next 60 days before  a new round of drilling in the summer, could prompt additional regulatory examination of...
NATIONAL
August 1, 2012 | By Laura J. Nelson
Shell has reduced the number of exploratory offshore Arctic wells it plans to drill this year as construction delays continue on a containment barge that must be finished first, the company says. Weather is also a factor: Shell engineers had hoped to begin drilling in early August, before ice forms in the fall. Arctic drilling is controversial: The bitter cold could hinder cleanup of any spill. The company had hoped to finish five exploratory wells this year, but now will attempt two: one in the Beaufort Sea northeast of Alaska, and one in the Chukchi Sea between Alaska and Siberia, officials said Tuesday.
NATIONAL
January 8, 2013 | By Kim Murphy
After a series of problems plagued the debut of offshore oil drilling in the U.S. Arctic, Interior Secretary Ken Salazar Tuesday ordered a high-level, expedited review of oil operations in Alaskan waters aimed at achieving “safe and responsible exploration for energy resources in the Arctic.” The review, scheduled to be completed over the next 60 days before  a new round of drilling in the summer, could prompt additional regulatory examination of...
NATIONAL
October 31, 2012 | By Kim Murphy
SEATTLE - The Kulluk drilling rig was in the process of dismantling in the Beaufort Sea off the coast of Alaska on Wednesday, concluding Shell Alaska's troubled debut season of offshore drilling in the U.S. Arctic. Company officials said the Noble Discoverer rig was already headed south out of the Chukchi Sea, and operations in the Beaufort were coming to a close on the last day allowed under federal permits for drilling, prohibited after the onset of winter ice. “Given the challenges we faced from the perspective of sea ice and logistics in deploying assets and employees to the Arctic for the first time in two decades, we're very pleased with the work we accomplished,” Shell spokesman Curtis Smith told the Los Angeles Times.
NATIONAL
August 31, 2012 | By Kim Murphy
WAINWRIGHT, Alaska - News that exploratory drilling in the Arctic could begin as early as next week brought a palpable sense of exuberance to the squat workers' camp on the Chukchi Sea, where Shell Alaska has been slowly preparing to launch operations about 70 miles offshore. “I've been waiting four years, coming up here to do this, and now I get to be here and be part of this new venture with the company. It's exciting,” Travis McNair, supervisor of Shell's oil spill response crew in this remote northwest Alaska coastal village, said in an interview.
NATIONAL
February 27, 2013 | By Kim Murphy
SEATTLE - Plagued with problems with both its drilling rigs and its oil spill containment vessel, Shell Alaska announced Wednesday that it will not conduct offshore drilling operations in the Alaska Arctic this year. The decision to “pause” Arctic drilling during the upcoming ice-free months of summer will allow the company to repair and retool its troubled rigs and prepare for future operations in a program that has already cost the company nearly $5 billion. The company will continue to do offshore scientific research and conduct meetings with villagers across the North Slope in an attempt to keep the program moving and ready for resumption “at a later stage,” company spokesman Curtis Smith told the Los Angeles Times.
NATIONAL
September 17, 2012 | By Kim Murphy
Shell Alaska said Monday it has abandoned its efforts to drill into hydrocarbon deposits in the offshore Arctic after the latest in a series of glitches on the company's troubled oil containment barge resulted in damage to the high-tech dome designed to contain oil in the event of an underwater spill. Company officials said they will continue to drill "top holes" off the Alaskan coast through the end of this season's drilling window, but will not attempt to reach any oil deposits this year -- a serious but not fatal setback for the company, which has spent six years attempting to explore its outer continental shelf leases off the coast of Alaska.
NATIONAL
October 31, 2012 | By Kim Murphy
SEATTLE - The Kulluk drilling rig was in the process of dismantling in the Beaufort Sea off the coast of Alaska on Wednesday, concluding Shell Alaska's troubled debut season of offshore drilling in the U.S. Arctic. Company officials said the Noble Discoverer rig was already headed south out of the Chukchi Sea, and operations in the Beaufort were coming to a close on the last day allowed under federal permits for drilling, prohibited after the onset of winter ice. “Given the challenges we faced from the perspective of sea ice and logistics in deploying assets and employees to the Arctic for the first time in two decades, we're very pleased with the work we accomplished,” Shell spokesman Curtis Smith told the Los Angeles Times.
NATIONAL
September 17, 2012 | By Kim Murphy
Shell Alaska said Monday it has abandoned its efforts to drill into hydrocarbon deposits in the offshore Arctic after the latest in a series of glitches on the company's troubled oil containment barge resulted in damage to the high-tech dome designed to contain oil in the event of an underwater spill. Company officials said they will continue to drill "top holes" off the Alaskan coast through the end of this season's drilling window, but will not attempt to reach any oil deposits this year -- a serious but not fatal setback for the company, which has spent six years attempting to explore its outer continental shelf leases off the coast of Alaska.
NATIONAL
August 31, 2012 | By Kim Murphy
WAINWRIGHT, Alaska - News that exploratory drilling in the Arctic could begin as early as next week brought a palpable sense of exuberance to the squat workers' camp on the Chukchi Sea, where Shell Alaska has been slowly preparing to launch operations about 70 miles offshore. “I've been waiting four years, coming up here to do this, and now I get to be here and be part of this new venture with the company. It's exciting,” Travis McNair, supervisor of Shell's oil spill response crew in this remote northwest Alaska coastal village, said in an interview.
NATIONAL
August 1, 2012 | By Laura J. Nelson
Shell has reduced the number of exploratory offshore Arctic wells it plans to drill this year as construction delays continue on a containment barge that must be finished first, the company says. Weather is also a factor: Shell engineers had hoped to begin drilling in early August, before ice forms in the fall. Arctic drilling is controversial: The bitter cold could hinder cleanup of any spill. The company had hoped to finish five exploratory wells this year, but now will attempt two: one in the Beaufort Sea northeast of Alaska, and one in the Chukchi Sea between Alaska and Siberia, officials said Tuesday.
NATIONAL
July 19, 2012 | By Kim Murphy
SEATTLE--The vessel designated to act as a crucial oil spill containment system in Arctic waters has obtained Coast Guard  approval to meet less rigorous weather standards than originally proposed. But, less than two weeks before drilling off Alaska's northern coast is due to begin, a series of troubling construction delays have left the Arctic Challenger without federal certification . The certification issue is the most serious Shell must confront if it is to successfully launch a exploratory drilling program, the first in Arctic waters in two decades, in which it already has invested $4 billion.
NATIONAL
October 7, 2010 | By Kim Murphy, Los Angeles Times
With the BP oil well blowout in the Gulf of Mexico successfully contained, Shell Alaska announced Wednesday that it had filed an application to proceed with exploratory offshore drilling in the Beaufort Sea off Alaska. The Obama administration suspended all offshore operations in the remote, fragile Arctic seas this year after the BP spill, but Shell officials said they had prepared a more robust oil blowout containment plan and were ready to proceed next summer with a single well 17 miles off the North Slope.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 17, 1991
A leak in a storage tank Saturday at Texaco's Wilmington refinery resulted in a spill of about 33,000 gallons of sulfuric acid, Texaco and Los Angeles City Fire Department officials said. Gil Espinoza, a Fire Department spokesman, said no injuries were reported in the 2:30 a.m. accident. Workers later discovered that the 30-foot storage tank in which the leak occurred had a six-inch crack, said Barbara Kornylo, a Texaco spokeswoman. The cause of the crack had not been determined.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 29, 1991
Workers deployed two booms across a creek Thursday in an apparently successful effort to stop a small oil spill from reaching the Pacific Ocean. None of the oil seeping into Ballona Creek in the Playa del Rey area reached the ocean, said county Lifeguard Lt. Jay Amundson. Unocal accepted responsibility for the spill but disputed a Los Angeles County Department of Public Works estimate that 20 barrels of oil leaked into the creek.
NATIONAL
May 5, 2010 | By Bettina Boxall and Jill Leovy, Los Angeles Times
Efforts on Wednesday to contain the Gulf of Mexico oil spill centered on a towering metal box the size of a four-story building that engineering teams hope will corral the crude that continues to spout from the seafloor. If the ambitious plan works, it could capture much of the 200,000 gallons of oil spewing daily from a well blowout and keep it from fattening the slick that threatens a coastline from Louisiana to Florida. The oil would be pumped nearly a mile up to a tanker ship.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 12, 2000 | MIKE ANTON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Fire officials expressed confidence that they contained Saturday's spill of several hundred gallons of fuel by an Irvine company before it could reach a creek leading to Newport's Back Bay. Emergency crews erected dikes a half-mile downhill from the spill, which officials said occurred between 8:30 and 10:30 a.m. at a Parker Hannifin Corp. facility at Jamboree Road and Michelson Drive.
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