Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsSpina Bifida
IN THE NEWS

Spina Bifida

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
January 5, 1990 | United Press International
Lindsay Sharp, a 7-year-old who shuns crutches despite being born with spina bifida, will spend the next year as national "ambassador" for the March of Dimes Birth Defects Foundation, officials have announced. Sharp is expected to travel about 60,000 miles during her term to talk about the prevention and treatment of birth defects.
ARTICLES BY DATE
ENTERTAINMENT
October 25, 2012 | By Robert Abele
The 12 men and women featured in Susan Polis Schutz's documentary "Seeds of Resiliency" have all worked awfully hard at overcoming tragedy, even if Schutz herself hasn't done a whole lot to make her film little more than a strung-together collection of interviews set to piano muzak. More like something you'd see at a seminar on perseverance than a movie, the featured interviewees are nevertheless remarkable examples of triumph: a young man born with spina bifida who can do flips in his wheelchair, an escapee of Idi Amin's regime who now helps African refugees, a Korean professor who quickly returned to teaching after becoming a quadriplegic.
Advertisement
NEWS
May 24, 1990 | TAMMERLIN DRUMMOND, TIMES STAFF WRITER
She came into the world with a mass of nerve tissue the size of a cantaloupe protruding from the base of her spine. Doctors told her parents that they would be better off leaving her behind in the hospital and letting nature take its course. Afflicted with a crippling spinal disease, their third child would not live much longer, doctors predicted, and if she did survive, she would be severely retarded and paralyzed. Her father agreed.
HEALTH
February 10, 2011 | By Thomas H. Maugh II, Los Angeles Times
Prenatal surgery for the most severe form of the birth defect spina bifida doubled the number of children who were able to walk unassisted by the age of 30 months and halved the percentage who had to have shunts implanted after birth to remove water from the brain, researchers reported Wednesday. The surgery, however, presented some risks to both children and mothers: Infants were more likely to be born preterm and mothers suffered a thinning of the uterine wall that would require all future births to end in a caesarean section.
HEALTH
February 10, 2011 | By Thomas H. Maugh II, Los Angeles Times
Prenatal surgery for the most severe form of the birth defect spina bifida doubled the number of children who were able to walk unassisted by the age of 30 months and halved the percentage who had to have shunts implanted after birth to remove water from the brain, researchers reported Wednesday. The surgery, however, presented some risks to both children and mothers: Infants were more likely to be born preterm and mothers suffered a thinning of the uterine wall that would require all future births to end in a caesarean section.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 7, 1990 | Compiled from Times Wire and Staff Reports
Spina bifida, a common and severe birth defect caused by a defect in the covering of the spinal cord, may one day be prevented by surgery to patch the fetal spine inside the womb, researchers at Johns Hopkins University reported last week at a meeting of the American Assn. of Neurological Surgeons. The study, conducted by Hopkins neurosurgeon Dan S. Heffez, suggests that spina bifida may result in part from exposure of the spinal cord to the womb's amniotic fluid.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 11, 1999
For infants who develop spina bifida, a surgical procedure performed early in the pregnancy can minimize damage from the disorder, researchers from the Children's Hospital of Philadelphia report in the New England Journal of Medicine. In spina bifida, embryos develop an opening in the bone that normally covers the spinal cord.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 8, 1993 | LESLIE BERKMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
When Dr. Sharon Kawai was born with a defective spine 45 years ago, the doctors told her mother that the infant was "a freak of nature" who should be left in the hospital to die quickly rather than face a short and horrible life. Today, after successfully battling the odds and enduring 50 surgeries, the petite blond mother of three children directs the physical rehabilitation program at St. Jude Medical Center in Fullerton.
NEWS
July 19, 1998 | MEKI COX, ASSOCIATED PRESS
Little Noah, smaller than the palm of his doctor's hand, was headed for a life in which he could never walk or control his urine and bowel movements. After only 20 weeks in his mother's womb, doctors could see that Noah Kipfmiller's backbone had not closed. His spinal cord was partially deformed, and nerve bundles protruded from his back. The only hope was to let doctors operate on the fetus while it remained in the mother's womb. That was four months ago.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 20, 2000 | THOMAS H. MAUGH II, TIMES MEDICAL WRITER
Immediately after they are born, most infants with the disabling birth defect spina bifida undergo surgery in which the faulty covering of their spinal cord is closed up. Most also receive a surgically implanted shunt to drain away spinal fluid that accumulates in the brain because of defects in the spinal cord. The surgeries provide some protection against future damage but do little to correct problems created by the defect. They are, according to Dr. Joseph P.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 14, 2010 | By Daina Beth Solomon, Los Angeles Times
Lourdes Mack giggles as she clambers onto her mom's lap to look at photos from last summer's Painted Turtle camp. In one, she swings her feet and twirls in her wheelchair. It was "Stage Night," and Lourdes danced to the song "You're the One That I Want" from "Grease." That special occasion was one of the few times in her life that Lourdes did not wear her leg braces. Born with spina bifida, a condition in which the spinal column is not completely developed at birth, Lourdes has grown up with leg paralysis.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 24, 2004 | Dana Parsons
This isn't a story I would have gone looking for. Nor is it in any way meant as a moral judgment on the Yorba Linda couple suing their obstetrician for not telling them about a prenatal test that likely would have shown that their daughter, now a year old, would be born with spina bifida. But that story hit a nerve with Patricia Bayley of Anaheim, who admits to recoiling a bit after reading that the legal terminology for the suit is a so-called "wrongful birth" or "wrongful life" claim.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 9, 2004 | Claire Luna, Times Staff Writer
Like most parents, Leilani Duff's mother and father say they want the best for their little girl, who celebrated her first birthday last week. But had they known what risks she faced in life, the child might never have been born. The Yorba Linda parents are suing their obstetrician, Dr.
NEWS
October 29, 2003 | Stephen Drake, Stephen Drake is the research analyst of Not Dead Yet, a national disability rights group.
Bob and Mary Schindler consistently refer to their daughter, Terri, as a disabled person. They're right. Although most newspapers are covering this story as an "end of life" or "right to life" issue, what ultimately happens to Terri Schiavo will affect countless other people with disabilities in this country. Like many disabled people, Terri Schiavo is unable to tell us what future she prefers. She left nothing saying she preferred starvation to living with a disability. She never signed a legal document designating her husband as her surrogate in the event she became unable to communicate.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 20, 2000 | THOMAS H. MAUGH II, TIMES MEDICAL WRITER
Immediately after they are born, most infants with the disabling birth defect spina bifida undergo surgery in which the faulty covering of their spinal cord is closed up. Most also receive a surgically implanted shunt to drain away spinal fluid that accumulates in the brain because of defects in the spinal cord. The surgeries provide some protection against future damage but do little to correct problems created by the defect. They are, according to Dr. Joseph P.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 11, 1999
For infants who develop spina bifida, a surgical procedure performed early in the pregnancy can minimize damage from the disorder, researchers from the Children's Hospital of Philadelphia report in the New England Journal of Medicine. In spina bifida, embryos develop an opening in the bone that normally covers the spinal cord.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 9, 2004 | Claire Luna, Times Staff Writer
Like most parents, Leilani Duff's mother and father say they want the best for their little girl, who celebrated her first birthday last week. But had they known what risks she faced in life, the child might never have been born. The Yorba Linda parents are suing their obstetrician, Dr.
NEWS
December 31, 1985
A 7-year-old boy confined to a wheelchair by a spinal disease got his big wish -- a ride on a Southern California Rapid Transit District bus from El Monte to Los Angeles. Rex Guitierrez, a volunteer for the Starlight Foundation, which fulfills wishes for chronically or terminally ill children, said Guillermo Franco "really had a ball. He just liked sitting behind the wheel and honking the horn."
NEWS
July 19, 1998 | MEKI COX, ASSOCIATED PRESS
Little Noah, smaller than the palm of his doctor's hand, was headed for a life in which he could never walk or control his urine and bowel movements. After only 20 weeks in his mother's womb, doctors could see that Noah Kipfmiller's backbone had not closed. His spinal cord was partially deformed, and nerve bundles protruded from his back. The only hope was to let doctors operate on the fetus while it remained in the mother's womb. That was four months ago.
HEALTH
March 16, 1998 | JOE GRAEDON and TERESEA GRAEDON, Joe Graedon is a pharmacologist. Teresa Graedon holds a doctorate in medical anthropology and is a nutrition expert
Question: How much folic acid do you need? I know this vitamin is important, but I am not sure how much to take. Answer: Folic acid is crucial for women who might become pregnant because it reduces the risk of a serious kind of birth defect called spina bifida. This B vitamin is also valuable in the prevention of heart disease. Foods rich in folic acid include lentils, split peas, brewer's yeast, spinach, collards, broccoli, peanuts and green peas.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|