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Spinal Cord Injury

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SPORTS
May 15, 1994 | BERT ROSENTHAL, ASSOCIATED PRESS
In the nine years since Marc Buoniconti sustained a spinal cord injury during a college football game, his father, Nick, has dedicated much of his life to his son's rehabilitation. "I made a commitment to Marc when he got hurt," said Nick Buoniconti, a former All-Pro and Pro Bowl linebacker with the Boston Patriots and Miami Dolphins. "I said money would not stand in the way. "Now, every night, Marc dreams that he will walk again. And he will."
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SCIENCE
April 8, 2014 | Melissa Healy
With the help of electrodes placed near the spine, patients who had been paralyzed for more than two years were able to regain some voluntary control over their legs, according to a study released Tuesday. The electrodes stimulated the spinal cords of the patients while they engaged in specific motor tasks involving their paralyzed limbs. Before the patients were injured and their spinal cords were damaged, their brains would have sent those key electrical signals to their legs. The new study upends the assumption that two years post-accident is a point of no return for people paralyzed due to a spinal cord injury.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 10, 1993 | SAM ENRIQUEZ, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Usually it is a car wreck. But there are also wounds from gunshots, plane crashes and falls from horses, bicycles and scaffolding. Everybody's story is a little different. Kristi Reid recalls nearly every detail of those first few hours, including the name of her emergency room nurse. Sam Barukh did not even know for a month that he was paralyzed. What they and others in recovery share in common is the lifelong effect of a spinal cord injury.
OPINION
December 9, 2013 | By Matthew Reeve
My father, actor Christopher Reeve, loved to travel, even after he was paralyzed from a severe spinal cord injury. During trips to places in the United States and abroad, he spoke with many people who, like him, had to find ways to navigate daily life while living with paralysis. These conversations only furthered his resolve that all people with disabilities should be able to lead healthy and productive lives, no matter where they live. Unlike many living with disabilities, however, my father was fortunate to have had the resources to be able to travel, and he always had access to the highest standard of care.
NEWS
February 1, 1990
A new spinal cord injury center that had remained vacant for more than a year at the Long Beach Veterans Administration Medical Center received its first contingent of patients this week. "We're all ecstatic," said Gabriel Perez, special assistant to the hospital's director. "The patients are excited and happy."
HEALTH
May 20, 2011 | Thomas H. Maugh II
A 25-year-old Los Angeles man paralyzed from the waist down after being hit by a car in 2006 has regained the ability to stand, take steps on a treadmill and move his hips, knees, ankles and toes voluntarily as a result of an experimental treatment developed at UCLA and the University of Louisville. Rob Summers has also regained some bladder and sexual function after intensive rehabilitation and two years of electrical stimulation to his damaged spinal cord with a device normally used for pain relief, researchers reported Thursday.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 27, 1988
An $18-million, 120-bed center for the treatment of spinal cord injuries was dedicated Wednesday at the Long Beach Veterans Administration Medical Center. Honored at the ceremony was 89-year-old Dr. Ernest Bors, for whom the new center is named. Bors, who drew international attention after World War II for his treatment programs for paralyzed veterans, retired in 1970 as chief of the spinal cord injury service at the Long Beach VA hospital.
NEWS
March 18, 2001 | AMY BETH GRAVES, ASSOCIATED PRESS
A new device that was surgically implanted into a spinal cord injury victim allows him to talk easier and breathe without a bulky ventilator. "It's wonderful. There's nothing like this in the world," said Tom Conlan, 36, who injured his spinal cord in a swimming accident in 1998 and is a quadriplegic. "When I was on the vent, I'd have to wait for it to give me a breath before I could talk. Now I don't."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 15, 1989 | DAVID HALDANE, Times Staff Writer
Two buildings at the Long Beach Veterans Affairs Medical Center offer a study in contrasts. One of them, built in 1967, houses as many as 160 patients with spinal cord injuries. Here, resting in drab wards of seven beds each, men and women in wheelchairs struggle toward health in quarters that are noisy and crowded. Less than 130 feet away at the end of a corridor, meanwhile, is the sleek new 140,000-square-foot Ernest Bors Spinal Cord Injury Center, which is twice the size of the older ward.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 2, 1991 | EDWARD J. BOYER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A 4-year-old Pomona girl who suffered a severe spinal cord injury during a forceps delivery that left her a quadriplegic was awarded $21 million Monday in a malpractice verdict against three physicians, her attorney said.
SPORTS
November 26, 2013 | By Eric Sondheimer
 Upland is planning a ceremony honoring injured Corona Santiago linebacker Jordan Walker prior to its playoff game on Friday night against Corona Centennial at Upland. Players and coaches from both teams are scheduled to take a knee at midfield while a moment of silence takes place offering support for Walker, who is hospitalized after suffering a spinal cord injury last Friday during a playoff game against Upland. Players from both teams are scheduled to wear No. 55 stickers in honor of Walker.
SPORTS
November 25, 2013 | By Eric Sondheimer
The parents of Corona Santiago linebacker Jordan Walker issued a statement Monday thanking medical staff for their son's treatment. Walker suffered a spinal cord injury on Friday night and is in critical condition at Loma Linda University Medical Center. His vitals are stable and he is responsive, the statement said. In the statement, Curtis and Allison Walker said, "The level of care and professionalism Jordan and we have encountered is unprecedented. Everyone we have encountered has been on top of everything as well as up front and honest about our son's condition.
SPORTS
November 25, 2013 | Bill Dwyre
It was "Friday Night Lights" in Corona, high school football center stage. The joy of anticipation bubbled over. Teenage players couldn't wait. Parents and friends were in the stands. The communities that embrace Corona Santiago High and Upland High were bundled up and full-throated. This was a quarterfinal game in the Southern Section Inland Division playoffs. Winning meant advancing to another game, more joyful anticipation, more pats on the back and maybe even longer looks from college scouts.
SCIENCE
October 24, 2013 | By Melissa Healy
Deep-brain stimulation, a technique used for more than a decade to manage the symptoms of Parkinson's disease, may help restore greater function and more natural movement to patients with spinal cord injuries that have left at least a few nerves intact, new research says. A study published this week in the journal Science Translational Medicine showed that in rats whose spinal cords were partially severed, the implantation of a pacemaker in the brain's mesencephalic locomotor region - a control center for the initiation of movement - restored the hind limbs' ability to run and support weight to near-normal levels.
OPINION
August 28, 2012
Who would be so cruel, so selfish, as to deny money for spinal cord injury research? Unless you wish further harm to people who are paralyzed or otherwise disabled by spinal injury, certainly you want Californians to open up their wallets to fund studies, right? Boiled down to its basics, that is the argument behind the well-meaning but misguided AB 1657, which would tack $1 onto moving traffic violation fines to fund spinal cord injury research. The asserted but questionable nexus between traffic tickets and medical research is that tickets are issued to drivers who violate the law, those violations usually constitute unsafe driving, unsafe driving causes car accidents, and car accidents are a leading cause of spinal cord injury.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 15, 2012 | By Valerie J. Nelson, Los Angeles Times
Paralyzed by a spinal cord injury in 1986, real estate developer Rogers Severson sought out a leading rehabilitation facility after doctors told the former college athlete he'd never walk again. Six months later, he walked out of Casa Colina Center for Rehabilitation in Pomona with the aid of a cane and the realization that he possessed what most patients there did not: excellent insurance and the personal means to pay for top-flight care. He vowed to help change that. Almost a year to the day after he was thrown from a mule, breaking two vertebrae, Severson stood before those gathered at a fundraising luncheon to benefit the charity he'd founded, the Spinal Cord Injury Special Fund.
SPORTS
April 16, 2005 | David Wharton, Times Staff Writer
Todd Hart never had any qualms about his son playing high school football. Not once did they talk about the possibility of a serious injury. "Never even came up," the San Juan Capistrano father said. Then he added: "I know that sounds strange." It sounds strange because, in 1982, Hart was playing defensive back for Long Beach State when a violent collision with two other players left him slumped face down on the field. He has been in a wheelchair ever since.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 20, 2004 | Kevin Pang, Times Staff Writer
It might be impossible to count how many lives Project Wipeout has saved. But its fight against neck and spinal cord injury at the beach is a continuing one, and sometimes its message comes too late. On Saturday, a 23-year-old Japanese student suffered what may be a paralyzing spinal cord injury off Laguna Beach. Koichi Mori, a competitive pole vaulter, was found face-down in the water but conscious.
NEWS
September 17, 2011 | By Jeannine Stein, Los Angeles Times / For the Booster Shots blog
A preliminary study finds that scuba diving may help improve muscle movement, touch sensitivity and post-traumatic stress disorder symptoms in people with spinal cord injuries. The small pilot study, presented Saturday at the Paralyzed Veterans of America conference in Orlando, Fla., involved 10 wheelchair-dependent disabled veterans who had suffered spinal cord injuries an average 15 years earlier and who underwent scuba diving certification. Pre-dive tests checked the participants' muscle spasticity, motor control, sensitivity to light touch and pinpricks, plus depression, obsessive-compulsive disorder and post-traumatic stress disorder symptoms.
HEALTH
May 20, 2011 | Thomas H. Maugh II
A 25-year-old Los Angeles man paralyzed from the waist down after being hit by a car in 2006 has regained the ability to stand, take steps on a treadmill and move his hips, knees, ankles and toes voluntarily as a result of an experimental treatment developed at UCLA and the University of Louisville. Rob Summers has also regained some bladder and sexual function after intensive rehabilitation and two years of electrical stimulation to his damaged spinal cord with a device normally used for pain relief, researchers reported Thursday.
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