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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 17, 2000
Re "Spineflower Won't Get Protected Designation," Nov. 27. How does U.S. Fish and Wildlife have enough staff, time and money to work with the developer "to develop a plan that will meet the needs of the species," and not enough time to finish listing the San Fernando Valley spineflower that had been thought to be extinct for decades? Why is Michael Spear, U.S. Fish and Wildlife California-Nevada operations manager, going out of his way to protect the developer's project that will likely extirpate the spineflower instead of doing his job?
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 18, 2003 | Steve Chawkins, Times Staff Writer
Five environmental groups sued the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service on Thursday over the status of a rare, dime-sized plant that has been thrust into bitter debates over two of Southern California's biggest proposed developments. The suit, filed in U.S. District Court in Washington, D.C., alleges the agency should be ordered to declare as endangered the San Fernando Valley spineflower.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 4, 1992
The bureaucrats have been stewing over the Los Angeles International Golf Club's environmental impact report for about four years and now they say that the developer's idea to set aside 65 acres for the weed-like spineflower is not enough. What do these secure bureaucrats have against jobs for the young? Over the years, the anti-development "no-growthers" have virtually stopped development with all their government regulation and intervention. We all are now reaping the harvest of their effort to put housing beyond the reach of almost everyone.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 27, 2002 | Richard Fausset and Nicholas Riccardi, Times Staff Writers
Newhall Land and Farming quietly destroyed large numbers of endangered wildflowers that could have complicated its efforts to construct Los Angeles County's largest residential housing development, according to court records and interviews.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 15, 1993 | JOHN SCHWADA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
State Assemblyman Richard Katz, angered by a developer's threat to remove an endangered plant from Big Tujunga Wash so a golf course can be built, on Thursday advocated buying the rugged and environmentally sensitive wetland and making it a public parkland. Katz's remarks came as Cosmo World Corp. threatened to remove the slender-horned spineflower, a frail and unremarkable-looking endangered plant from a 355-acre parcel that it wants to develop as a luxury golf club.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 14, 1993
Project Is Not Reasonable It is five years since the developers of the proposed world-class golf course on private property in the Big Tujunga Wash submitted an application for a permit to the appropriate federal agencies. Five long years and no decision for a project that has overwhelming community support. It's not reasonable. What kind of patience, what kind of judgment is required from an applicant to get a governmental decision? Despite news reports to the contrary, it has been the applicant, Cosmo World, that has been leading the fight to protect and preserve the alleged endangered species, the slender-horned spineflower.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 3, 1997
I read with some disgust the recent Tujunga Wash golf course decision. Apparently our City Council did an about-face on its decision because of a 24th-hour revelation presented to them by a disgruntled union ("The Open Space Vote Bears the Union Label," July 24). Why these "facts" did not surface prior to the "research" of the union puzzles me. I find it quite amusing that all the research done by all the committees and subcommittees and who knows how many other factions could not find these terrible things that the developer had committed or had purported to commit.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 25, 2000 | GIDEON KANNER, Gideon Kanner is professor of law emeritus at the Loyola Law School and a columnist for the National Law Journal
If you have been watching TV and you think that the scarlet pimpernel is an adventurous little flower that gets around, you ain't seen nothin' yet. When it comes to high-profile mobility and garnering publicity, the real achiever in the floral kingdom is the San Fernando Valley spineflower, whose deeds of derring-do are all the more remarkable because it's extinct. Usually, when a plant is extinct, it's outta here, gone, kaput. But not in this area. Here, when a flower becomes extinct, that's only the beginning of its career.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 2, 2000
Re "The Case of the Environmental Overachievers," June 25. I was intrigued by Gideon Kanner's contention that NIMBY environmentalists are selfishly trying to protect the habitats of certain endangered species and thus creating an impending housing shortage leading California to economic disaster. I too find fault with these so-called environmentalists--mainly, "What took you so long?" Forget the spineflower and the arroyo toad. What about the hundreds of now-extinct species we will never know?
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 3, 2000
In a Nov. 26 letter ("Ahmanson Ranch Development," Letters to the Valley Edition) Westlake Village residents Sharon and Herb Cohen claimed that if the Ahmanson Ranch development is built, "future generations will have to go to a museum to see what open areas used to look like." The opposite is true. The Ahmanson Ranch made possible 10,000 acres of parkland as part of a trade-off for a responsible development. As a park volunteer with more than 1,000 hours assisting Santa Monica Mountains National Recreation Area visitors, I know firsthand how much hikers, mountain bicyclists and equestrians are enjoying this gift, and will continue to do so in perpetuity.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 25, 2001
I am pleased to see more organizations and more individuals getting involved in the fight against Washington Mutual's plans to develop Ahmanson Ranch. However, it is going to take all the cities affected by this development to speak out. It is going to take all the residents to contact their city, county and state officials to let them know their feelings on this project. It is going to take the city, county and state officials to come out and voice their objections to this project.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 26, 2001 | From Times Staff Reports
The San Fernando Valley spineflower--which was believed to be extinct until discovered on two housing development sites in 1999--has been declared an endangered species by the California Fish and Game Commission. Spineflowers were discovered at Ahmanson Ranch in Ventura County and at Newhall Ranch in neighboring Los Angeles County. Both developments would create a total of more than 25,000 homes.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 15, 2001 | MARGARET TALEV, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Five environmental groups and the city of Calabasas have sued the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service and Interior Secretary Gale Norton, hoping to block the development of Ahmanson Ranch by getting a rare plant on the site listed as endangered. Although the courts can't give the San Fernando Valley spineflower protected status, a U.S. District Court judge could force the Fish and Wildlife Service to make a decision, said John Buse, a lawyer with the Environmental Defense Center in Ventura.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 17, 2000
Re "Spineflower Won't Get Protected Designation," Nov. 27. How does U.S. Fish and Wildlife have enough staff, time and money to work with the developer "to develop a plan that will meet the needs of the species," and not enough time to finish listing the San Fernando Valley spineflower that had been thought to be extinct for decades? Why is Michael Spear, U.S. Fish and Wildlife California-Nevada operations manager, going out of his way to protect the developer's project that will likely extirpate the spineflower instead of doing his job?
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 3, 2000
In a Nov. 26 letter ("Ahmanson Ranch Development," Letters to the Valley Edition) Westlake Village residents Sharon and Herb Cohen claimed that if the Ahmanson Ranch development is built, "future generations will have to go to a museum to see what open areas used to look like." The opposite is true. The Ahmanson Ranch made possible 10,000 acres of parkland as part of a trade-off for a responsible development. As a park volunteer with more than 1,000 hours assisting Santa Monica Mountains National Recreation Area visitors, I know firsthand how much hikers, mountain bicyclists and equestrians are enjoying this gift, and will continue to do so in perpetuity.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 3, 2000
"San Fernando Valley Spineflower Won't Get Protected Designation," Nov. 27. Michael Spear, California-Nevada operations manager for Fish and Wildlife has arbitrarily and capriciously declared the thought-to-be-extinct San Fernando Valley spineflower found on Ahmanson Ranch not to need an emergency listing. Spear is wrong. Long-term protection for this fragile plant is mandated by federal law, which Spear is in charge of implementing. Spear wants to wait until Washington Mutual's bulldozers come to destroy Ahmanson Ranch to consider protecting the plant.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 3, 2000
"San Fernando Valley Spineflower Won't Get Protected Designation," Nov. 27. Michael Spear, California-Nevada operations manager for Fish and Wildlife has arbitrarily and capriciously declared the thought-to-be-extinct San Fernando Valley spineflower found on Ahmanson Ranch not to need an emergency listing. Spear is wrong. Long-term protection for this fragile plant is mandated by federal law, which Spear is in charge of implementing. Spear wants to wait until Washington Mutual's bulldozers come to destroy Ahmanson Ranch to consider protecting the plant.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 25, 2001
I am pleased to see more organizations and more individuals getting involved in the fight against Washington Mutual's plans to develop Ahmanson Ranch. However, it is going to take all the cities affected by this development to speak out. It is going to take all the residents to contact their city, county and state officials to let them know their feelings on this project. It is going to take the city, county and state officials to come out and voice their objections to this project.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 27, 2000 | ANNETTE KONDO, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The San Fernando Valley spineflower, until recently considered extinct, will not be declared an endangered species on an emergency basis, according to federal officials. U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service officials cited staff and budget shortfalls in announcing they will not be able to come to a decision on the spineflower--found last year on land earmarked for the Ahmanson Ranch project--within the one-year period mandated by federal law.
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