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SPORTS
December 11, 1986 | RICH ROBERTS, Times Staff Writer
John Spence was down in the bowels of Buddy Melges' Heart of America Tuesday--and then he was outside and in the water, just like that, wondering what had happened. A spinnaker sail being raised filled prematurely and whisked him completely out through a hatch like a slingshot. "It was blowing about 35 (knots), and we blew our chute out on the second reach," said Spence, 22, the mastman.
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BUSINESS
September 20, 2005 | From Associated Press
Norsk Hydro, an Oslo-based petroleum and aluminum producer, said Monday that it had agreed to buy Houston-based oil and natural gas company Spinnaker Exploration Co. for $2.45 billion to boost its presence and growth potential in the Gulf of Mexico. Norsk Hydro said it would pay $65.50 a share in cash for all outstanding common shares and options of Spinnaker, a 34% premium to the Friday close of $48.75. Spinnaker shares rose $15.40 to $64.15 on Monday after the announcement.
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SPORTS
March 16, 1985 | RICH ROBERTS, Times Staff Writer
The Congressional Cup is supposed to match the superstars of sailing, but some of them got caught with their reputations down Friday. Two-time defending champion Dave Perry and America's Cup campaigners John Kolius and Rod Friday's Competition Davis all blew opportunities to take charge of the four-day series off Long Beach and remained in a first-place deadlock with 5-2 records and two races remaining today.
NEWS
June 25, 1992 | JANE HULSE, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
If you think kids as young as 5 years old are too little to learn how to sail, don't tell Leo Robbins. Robbins, who founded the city of Ventura's sailing program 20 years ago, says children are some of his best pupils. "They learn faster," said Robbins, 72. "They're fearless." Robbins is so impressed with the ability of children to learn the ropes that he is running a pilot "peewee" program next month for children 5 to 8 years old.
SPORTS
January 17, 1987 | RICH ROBERTS, Times Staff Writer
Probably nobody on earth can name the offensive linemen of the New York Giants and Denver Broncos and the winch grinders on Stars & Stripes and New Zealand's KZ7, but they have a lot in common. You can't go to a Super Bowl without blockers or to an America's Cup without grinders. When the battle turns from wits to the pits, "they're the heroes," says Peter Isler, the navigator on the San Diego boat, of the men who operate the winches used for trimming sails.
SPORTS
May 5, 1991 | RICH ROBERTS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Bill Koch says the new International America's Cup Class boats are "incredibly dangerous" and the men who designed them are "idiots." Chris Dickson disagrees. He says maybe his mast fell down Saturday because it was Butsu Metsu Day--the one day a year Buddha takes off, depriving followers of his protection. Koch was serious. Dickson? It depends how far the New Zealand citizen is into the culture of the Japanese, for whom he sails.
MAGAZINE
August 31, 1986
In terms of excitement, 12-meter racing has much in common with chess. The yachts appear to meander lazily around buoys, employing tactics all but obscure to spectators on boats nearly a mile away. A 24-mile race takes from three to five hours and usually is decided by a matter of seconds.
SPORTS
November 24, 1991 | RICH ROBERTS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
After "15 or 16" sailing races to Mexico and half a dozen to Hawaii, Bill Matchett thought he had experienced everything. Then, in this week's race from Long Beach, Matchett went overboard. "I've done a lot of miles, been in lots of gnarly conditions in the Atlantic (and the) Pacific, and never thought I'd be the kind of guy to go over the side," he said. But over the side he went, when he least expected to. He was saved only because he and the boat's crew knew exactly what to do.
BUSINESS
March 31, 1988 | Richard O'Reilly, Richard O'Reilly designs microcomputer applications for The Times
With a name like Better Working Eight-in-One and a price tag of $59.95, you might expect to see this program hustled on some late-night commercials, in between the ginzu knives and vegetable graters. Despite the awkward name and low, low price, this eight-function integrated program from Spinnaker Software for the IBM PC and compatible computers ought to take a place on dealers' shelves right alongside the big-name packages.
SPORTS
February 10, 1986 | Associated Press
The yacht French Kiss of France overcame a ripped head sail Sunday to win the second race of the World 12-meter Sailing Championships in blustery weather and rough Indian Ocean seas. French Kiss, skippered by Marc Pajot, survived 6-foot swells and 24-knot winds which forced two boats to retire and several others to lose their headsails and break gear. Pajot said that on the third leg a clew on the foresail had broken.
SPORTS
November 24, 1991 | RICH ROBERTS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
After "15 or 16" sailing races to Mexico and half a dozen to Hawaii, Bill Matchett thought he had experienced everything. Then, in this week's race from Long Beach, Matchett went overboard. "I've done a lot of miles, been in lots of gnarly conditions in the Atlantic (and the) Pacific, and never thought I'd be the kind of guy to go over the side," he said. But over the side he went, when he least expected to. He was saved only because he and the boat's crew knew exactly what to do.
SPORTS
May 5, 1991 | RICH ROBERTS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Bill Koch says the new International America's Cup Class boats are "incredibly dangerous" and the men who designed them are "idiots." Chris Dickson disagrees. He says maybe his mast fell down Saturday because it was Butsu Metsu Day--the one day a year Buddha takes off, depriving followers of his protection. Koch was serious. Dickson? It depends how far the New Zealand citizen is into the culture of the Japanese, for whom he sails.
BUSINESS
March 31, 1988 | Richard O'Reilly, Richard O'Reilly designs microcomputer applications for The Times
With a name like Better Working Eight-in-One and a price tag of $59.95, you might expect to see this program hustled on some late-night commercials, in between the ginzu knives and vegetable graters. Despite the awkward name and low, low price, this eight-function integrated program from Spinnaker Software for the IBM PC and compatible computers ought to take a place on dealers' shelves right alongside the big-name packages.
SPORTS
January 27, 1987 | RICH ROBERTS, Times Staff Writer
The rival camps and neutral observers agree that Kookaburra III is faster downwind than Stars & Stripes, but Dennis Conner may have found a weapon, named Dolly, to close the gap. Dolly is a chesty, triple-tiered spinnaker sail borrowed from America II, whose crew, after studying its proportions, christened it in honor of Dolly Parton. America II was eliminated in the trial rounds, but Dolly lives on, inhaling the fresh air out on Gage Roads.
SPORTS
January 17, 1987 | RICH ROBERTS, Times Staff Writer
Probably nobody on earth can name the offensive linemen of the New York Giants and Denver Broncos and the winch grinders on Stars & Stripes and New Zealand's KZ7, but they have a lot in common. You can't go to a Super Bowl without blockers or to an America's Cup without grinders. When the battle turns from wits to the pits, "they're the heroes," says Peter Isler, the navigator on the San Diego boat, of the men who operate the winches used for trimming sails.
SPORTS
December 11, 1986 | RICH ROBERTS, Times Staff Writer
John Spence was down in the bowels of Buddy Melges' Heart of America Tuesday--and then he was outside and in the water, just like that, wondering what had happened. A spinnaker sail being raised filled prematurely and whisked him completely out through a hatch like a slingshot. "It was blowing about 35 (knots), and we blew our chute out on the second reach," said Spence, 22, the mastman.
SPORTS
January 4, 1987 | RICH ROBERTS, Times Staff Writer
The hand-to-mouth Sydney entry gave this America's Cup a built-in joke from the beginning. A crewman from the rival powerhouse Alan Bond syndicate said: "I'd rather be brown bread than sail on a boat with a name like that." On its first day out for a test sail in Sydney harbor, in full view of the famous bridge and opera house, the 12-meter rammed its tender.
SPORTS
January 27, 1987 | RICH ROBERTS, Times Staff Writer
The rival camps and neutral observers agree that Kookaburra III is faster downwind than Stars & Stripes, but Dennis Conner may have found a weapon, named Dolly, to close the gap. Dolly is a chesty, triple-tiered spinnaker sail borrowed from America II, whose crew, after studying its proportions, christened it in honor of Dolly Parton. America II was eliminated in the trial rounds, but Dolly lives on, inhaling the fresh air out on Gage Roads.
MAGAZINE
August 31, 1986
In terms of excitement, 12-meter racing has much in common with chess. The yachts appear to meander lazily around buoys, employing tactics all but obscure to spectators on boats nearly a mile away. A 24-mile race takes from three to five hours and usually is decided by a matter of seconds.
SPORTS
February 10, 1986 | Associated Press
The yacht French Kiss of France overcame a ripped head sail Sunday to win the second race of the World 12-meter Sailing Championships in blustery weather and rough Indian Ocean seas. French Kiss, skippered by Marc Pajot, survived 6-foot swells and 24-knot winds which forced two boats to retire and several others to lose their headsails and break gear. Pajot said that on the third leg a clew on the foresail had broken.
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