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NEWS
October 15, 2011
Darilyn Rice traveled to Madrid in March to visit family. On an excursion to Segovia, about an hour northwest of Spain's capital, she shot this photo of the Segovia Cathedral in the late afternoon as she hurried to her car. The weather was chilly, and the Thousand Oaks resident wasn't prepared for the cold. "I literally snapped it and ran," she said. Fortunately, luck smiled on her. Rice used a Canon PowerShot SX10 IS. View past photos we've featured . To upload your own, visit our reader travel photo gallery . When you upload your photo, tell us where it was taken and when.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NATIONAL
March 20, 2014 | By Michael Muskal
A New Jersey teenager managed to wiggle through a security fence then make his way past a guard to the spire atop 1 World Trade Center, the nation's tallest building, where he took pictures before he was apprehended, officials said Thursday. The boy, who authorities said was being treated as an adult, was charged with misdemeanor criminal trespass in the Sunday morning stunt and faces up to a year in jail if convicted. Officials identified him as Justin Casquejo, 16, of Weehawken, N.J. "We take security and these types of infractions very seriously and will prosecute violators," Joseph Dunne, chief security officer for the Port Authority of New York and New Jersey, which owns the site, said in a statement.
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SPORTS
May 5, 2000 | BILL CHRISTINE
In 1895, a young architect, taken with a single spire atop a nearby mental institution, designed two spires that were built on the roof of the new grandstand at Churchill Downs. The twin spires, the brainchild of Joseph Baldez, have become the most recognizable feature of Churchill and the Kentucky Derby, and one of the most recognizable landmarks in sports. They've been called towers, cupolas and steeples by visitors to the Derby, but to the locals they can only be the spires.
NATIONAL
November 11, 2013 | By Tina Susman
NEW YORK - It was all so simple for King Kong, the giant ape who fled his captors by clambering to the top of the Empire State Building. Back then, there was no question the Manhattan icon was America's tallest skyscraper. But that was before Sept. 11, 2001, when the destruction of the World Trade Center towers sparked a rebuilding effort that included vows to produce a new "tallest skyscraper" for the country: a 1,776-foot-high building designed to pack a symbolic punch and serve as a memorial to those killed in the attacks.
TRAVEL
October 13, 2002
Amanda Jones, in her article "Fall in Cowboy Country" (Sept. 22), reported that Grand Teton means "large breast" in French, and the mountains were named by French Canadian trappers who were reminded of the female anatomy when they saw them. Is U.S. Atty. Gen. John Ashcroft aware of this? He'll have a terrible time draping spires reaching 13,770 feet. Samuel M. Rosen Newbury Park
OPINION
August 1, 2008
Re "A high-water mark for Mono Lake," July 24 Thank you for the stories on the rebirth of California's endangered wetlands. I am blessed to have seen Mono Lake the way it used to be before Los Angeles began to take its water. In 1926, when I was 12, my family took me camping in the high Sierra. The way there was hazardous, with narrow, winding roads. Highway 395 was primitive and rough. The land to the east was a vast meadow extending clear to the lake shore. In the near distance, there it was -- the shimmering jewel of Mono Lake.
NEWS
June 18, 1995 | DENIS D. GRAY, ASSOCIATED PRESS
With hammers and crowbars they're knocking down old, atmospheric Rangoon, one of Asia's last reminders of the past, to make way for high-rise hotels and shopping centers. The 20th Century has finally caught up with Rangoon, where high-rise once meant the soaring spires of Buddhist pagodas, and tree-lined avenues were flanked by probably the largest collection of British colonial buildings in the world. Now, big chunks of the uniform urbanscape are being ripped out of the heart of Rangoon--now officially named Yangon--and the skyline has been pierced by several buildings approaching 20 stories.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 1, 1989
Re "Church's Spire and Meaning of Religion" (Opinion Page, Sept. 24): So now we know what the affluent Christians of Orange County do with their money. Like S. Manning and Ralph Jones, I too was outraged to read that the Rev. Robert Schuller has amassed $5.5 million in donations for construction of a 233-foot stainless steel spire, estimated to cost in excess of $7.7 million. It appears that Schuller, sitting aloft in his Crystal Cathedral, is so full of himself that he has lost sight of the thousands of needy and homeless in Orange County.
REAL ESTATE
February 16, 1997
February and early March are the best for planting the spectacular Giant Pacific delphiniums. For towering results, use 4-inch pots at nurseries now, add water-soaked polymer (such as Broadleaf P4) and slow-release fertilizer (such as Osmocote) to the bottom of each hole.
BOOKS
December 24, 1995
In a world of souls, I set out to find them. They who must first find each other, be each other's fate. There, on the open road, I gazed into each traveler's face. Is it you? I would ask. Are you the ones? No, no, they said, or said nothing at all. How many cottages did I pass, each with a mother, a father, a firstborn, newly swaddled, crying; or sitting in its little chair, dipping a fat wooden spoon into a steaming bowl, its mother singing it a foolish song, One, one, a lily's my care . . .
ENTERTAINMENT
May 10, 2013 | By Jamie Wetherbe
A spire set atop One World Trade Center on Friday was greeted with cheers from workers high in the air and spectators from the street below. The 408-foot spire, draped in an American flag, brought the New York City structure to a height of 1,776 feet, symbolic of the year the country declared independence, and topped off an 11-year effort to restore the city's skyline following the 9/11 terror attacks. The 758-ton silver structure will serve as a broadcast antenna, a signal for aircraft, and for many, a resurrection of the World Trade Center.
NATIONAL
May 10, 2013 | By Michael Mello
New York City can once again claim to be home to the tallest building in the country, and the Western Hemisphere for that matter. On Friday, workers topped off the new One World Trade Center building with a spire making the structure 1,776 feet tall, symbolizing the year the United States was born. The finishing touch, performed by New York construction company Tishman, involved workers securing the final two portions of the spire with 60 bolts at 1,701 feet, according to the Port Authority of New York and New Jersey , which owns the site.
NATIONAL
May 2, 2013 | By Michael Muskal
New York showed its colors on Thursday as flag-draped pieces of the silver spire, designed to be the crown of the reconstructed World Trade Center, were hoisted into the sky. The final segments were raised through sunny skies to rest on a construction platform for several weeks awaiting final installation. The spire will be part of the transmission facilities for the region's media outlets and will sit atop what is also known as Freedom Tower. At the tip will be a beacon. When the 408-foot spire is attached, the new One World Trade Center building will soar 1,776 feet above the ground, a patriotic number designed to make the new building the tallest in the Western Hemisphere and the third-tallest in the world.
BUSINESS
September 13, 2012 | By Salvador Rodriguez
The iPhone 5 will be coming to Cricket Wireless and C Spire Wireless beginning Sept. 28. The two smaller U.S. carriers announced Thursday that they too would sell the new smartphone, which Apple officially unveiled Wednesday. Neither company has given more details besides a launch date, but it's safe to assume that Cricket, a prepaid carrier, will offer the iPhone 5 for more than $200 since it does not require customers to sign a service contract. Cricket began carrying the iPhone 4S this summer, and it sold the phone starting at $499.99.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 23, 2012 | By Dennis McLellan, Los Angeles Times
Nicholas King was an actor and an assistant to renowned Hollywood photographer Bob Willoughby in the late 1950s when a close friend of Willoughby stopped by his home with intriguing news. The friend, film editor William Cartwright, had visited the famed Watts Towers for the first time and was surprised by what he saw. The unique work of folk art, created over 33 years by Italian immigrant Simon Rodia, had been abandoned since he moved away in 1954. His former house had burned down, the gates to the walled property were open and unguarded, and the grounds were littered with refuse left by unwanted visitors.
NEWS
October 15, 2011
Darilyn Rice traveled to Madrid in March to visit family. On an excursion to Segovia, about an hour northwest of Spain's capital, she shot this photo of the Segovia Cathedral in the late afternoon as she hurried to her car. The weather was chilly, and the Thousand Oaks resident wasn't prepared for the cold. "I literally snapped it and ran," she said. Fortunately, luck smiled on her. Rice used a Canon PowerShot SX10 IS. View past photos we've featured . To upload your own, visit our reader travel photo gallery . When you upload your photo, tell us where it was taken and when.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 24, 1989
Re the Crystal Cathedral's plans to add a $5.5-million stainless steel spire because the Rev. Robert Schuller "always felt that all great cathedrals have spires": First, I'd like to refer him to Matthew 6: "And when thou prayest, thou shalt not be as the hypocrites are, for they love to pray in the corners of the streets, that they may be seen of men. Lay not up for yourselves treasures upon earth . . . but in heaven . . . for there will be...
TRAVEL
July 3, 2011 | By Jen Leo, Special to the Los Angeles Times
Do we really need another members-only travel flash-sale site? If you've ever scored a deal on one, then yes, because they can be addicting. If one site doesn't have the destination you're looking for, another might. Introducing: Spire.com . Name: Spire What it does: Offers members (free to join) luxury hotel stays at 30% off the lowest offer found anywhere else for a limited time. What's hot: The site offers a "Best Deal Guarantee. " If you find the same room at the same hotel for a lower price, Spire will refund the difference between the lower rate and what you paid, plus give you $100 credit toward future Spire reservations.
OPINION
April 12, 2010
The all-too-few art patrons who have actually made the drive to South L.A. to see the Watts Towers have witnessed something remarkable: one man's cathedral, a massive tiara set with junk that glitters like gemstones, a tribute to artistic obsession and human potential. Yet although the towers are a cultural treasure -- one of only six national historic landmarks in the city and a symbol of pride and resilience for the community -- they have long been a drain on the city treasury. In 1955, when Simon Rodia walked away from the backyard project that had taken up 34 years of his life, he left behind what a former Times art critic called "the greatest existing work of folk art"; what the impoverished Italian stonemason didn't leave was a bequest to pay for maintaining it. Once threatened with the wrecking ball, the towers have been saved by occasional infusions of state, local and federal funding and are kept in decent but insufficient repair by the city's Cultural Affairs Department.
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