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Spirulina

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NEWS
July 3, 1995 | TONY PERRY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Japanese engineer, the Ethiopian chemist and the Mexican American production manager looked over their simmering crop of spirulina and they were pleased. It is an unlikely crop in an unlikely place, but Yoshimichi Ota, Amha Belay and Juan Chavez have midwifed into existence the largest farm in the world devoted to growing the protein-rich algae with the blue-green hue. The Aztecs, had they lived so long, undoubtedly would have approved.
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HEALTH
April 21, 2003 | Shari Roan
Spirulina, a type of blue-green algae, has attracted a wide following in the United States as a kind of super-food packed with protein, vitamins and minerals. Grown in brackish ponds and lakes around the world, spirulina sometimes has been given to malnourished populations as part of organized feeding programs. Many health experts, however, see no use for spirulina among well-fed people, calling it "expensive pond scum."
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HEALTH
April 21, 2003 | Shari Roan
Spirulina, a type of blue-green algae, has attracted a wide following in the United States as a kind of super-food packed with protein, vitamins and minerals. Grown in brackish ponds and lakes around the world, spirulina sometimes has been given to malnourished populations as part of organized feeding programs. Many health experts, however, see no use for spirulina among well-fed people, calling it "expensive pond scum."
NEWS
July 3, 1995 | TONY PERRY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Japanese engineer, the Ethiopian chemist and the Mexican American production manager looked over their simmering crop of spirulina and they were pleased. It is an unlikely crop in an unlikely place, but Yoshimichi Ota, Amha Belay and Juan Chavez have midwifed into existence the largest farm in the world devoted to growing the protein-rich algae with the blue-green hue. The Aztecs, had they lived so long, undoubtedly would have approved.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 17, 1985 | DANIEL P. PUZO, Times Staff Writer
The guests sipped algae cocktails and munched hors d'oeuvres laced with algae while a band played show tunes. A 9-year-old gave a karate demonstration, and videotaped images of blue-green spiral-shaped algae danced on the screen. Finally, it was time for Christopher Hills to talk about his "vision." "We can feed the world," the tuxedo-clad Hills, 58, president of Microalgae International Sales Corp., told an enthusiastic crowd of 500 at a recent reception at the Century Plaza.
NEWS
February 10, 1997 | From Times Wire Services
Microbiologist and visionary Christopher Hills Jr., who helped pioneer the health food and human consciousness movements, has died at home after a long illness. He was 70. Hills was co-discoverer of the protein-rich plankton spirulina, the base for many natural food products, and founded the University of the Trees in Boulder Creek, Calif.
FOOD
August 17, 1995 | CHARLES PERRY
When they were being whimsical, people used to claim the moon is made of green cheese. They were not referring to a cheese that's green in color, of course; green cheese is simply the opposite of ripe or aged cheese. It is a pale lunar white, like cottage cheese; ripened cheese tends to be tawny, like Swiss or Gouda. But there are cheeses with green veins in them, like blue cheeses. And in 16th-Century Mexico, there was a green "cheese" that was dairy-free.
NEWS
September 28, 2004
'It looks like a scary piece of cheese that I found in the bottom of my toy box one time.' -- David Sadler Elementary school student, San Diego * 'A contrast between healthy bay land habitat [right side] and deteriorated habitat. Decades of commercial salt production dramatically altered these bay lands, but a collaborative initiative is underway to restore 16,000 acres to their original health and vitality.'
ENTERTAINMENT
May 2, 1993 | LAURIE OCHOA
People are talking about . . . spirulina? Fashion is inspired by the hippies these days, and so is food. Consider the Nature Club, where a whole new generation can discover brown rice, tofu and even spirulina, which the glossary on the menu helpfully defines as a "vitamin-laden green algae from the sea." The people who run the cafe--part of a new natural health spa--know that there are a lot of us who missed out on the '60s.
HEALTH
April 1, 2002 | AMANDA URSELL, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Although halitosis was long thought to be an incurable affliction, in recent years researchers have learned that bad breath can be treated, not simply camouflaged. The breakthrough came in recent years as scientists began to prove that, contrary to popular belief, bad breath rarely, if ever, stems from the digestive tract, but is due instead to excessive buildup of bacteria on the tongue, teeth and gums.
HEALTH
July 9, 2007
As a 69-year-old male who has experienced gout in my big-toe joints for 14 years, I appreciated your article very much ["Got Gout? Try Milk -- or Cherries," July 2]. After trial and error, I have isolated three events that trigger an attack in me. Some years ago a friend joked that she had given her ex-husband gout. She is a health food believer and had given him a dose of Spirulina, a supplement that is supposed to boost energy. The next day, he couldn't get his shoes on.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 12, 1999 | SUSAN ESSOYAN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
On a dramatic lava rock coastline that draws tourists from around the globe, researchers are mining a new scientific frontier that may help this island state broaden its economic base beyond sun and fun. Scientists at the Natural Energy Laboratory of Hawaii, just a few miles from the Big Island's luxury resorts, are exploring the humble world of microalgae with an eye toward drug discovery.
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